Strange Aeons Radio

CALAMITYVILLE!

March 14, 2024 Strange Aeons Radio Season 1 Episode 8
CALAMITYVILLE!
Strange Aeons Radio
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Strange Aeons Radio
CALAMITYVILLE!
Mar 14, 2024 Season 1 Episode 8
Strange Aeons Radio

CALAMITYVILLE!
The gang gets together for a virtual half-episode, and talks about  all the
movies they've been watching. Then, Anthony James Kay joins Eric and Kelly for another look at Amityville II: The Possession

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript

CALAMITYVILLE!
The gang gets together for a virtual half-episode, and talks about  all the
movies they've been watching. Then, Anthony James Kay joins Eric and Kelly for another look at Amityville II: The Possession

Support the Show.

Unknown:

Oh, I'm sorry, did I break your concentration somewhere between science and superstition such sights to show you strange aeons. Welcome to a very different strange aeons radio. That's Eric up there. Hello. And that's Vanessa. There. Hello. I'm Kelly. And we were going to be recording our Charles Dexter awards this Sunday. But life gets in the way, doesn't it? Eric? That's right. Yes. My as mentioned in a previous episode, my father in law's got severely badly injured. And he's recovering in the hospital and while recovering in the hospital, he got COVID. I'm testing negative the house I'm staying with his wife was text. Everybody in there's testing negative but well being what it is. And considering the tiny little person living in one of our houses, taking chances. Yeah, sorry, overly protective of the tiny human who like she doesn't even have like the ability to know what an injury is. Yeah, it's just be a lot a lot of crime. Yeah, well, so we thought we would do something like this, which is just going to be kind of a mini episode and kind of talk about what we've watched and stuff like that. And then next weekend, we'll get right back to doing the Charles Dexter Awards, which of course, is our, our version of the Academy Awards here. Yes, absolutely. I'll let a little potential secret out of the bag many of you have been asking for over the years. I think I've cracked the code on how we can turn ourselves into a full time video podcast, which was supposed to be being done this weekend. So we are going to try that with our next episode. If you don't see any video with that one, then it didn't go over very well. I'm gonna try dammit. Now we'll be in person, but we'll be filming us. Oh my gosh. Yes. A bunch of wait before now and then start doing pull ups pull ups and get it going. Well, you guys I just got back from my family get together for the weekend, which was a blast as always, but it did mean I had about four bottles of wine last night. Okay, so I pulled right in and fired up the computer about you know, three minutes before we were supposed to do this. So I am as prepared as I will ever be. We're gonna get quality content out of Kelly today. That is what I'm hearing is like, Do you have a weird thing to chat about in movies if you would like if usual start off with a strange subject. I was reading about the new Roadhouse movie, the remake. Several of the fights are CGI. What? No. Carrot like they are they somebody saw it at a film festival and they're talking about. So fights now are CGI too, huh. And according to this article, what it's going to be is the way insurance is running now. And it's getting so expensive to cover movies that you should expect to see all kinds of CGI action like all car wrecks, all any kind of car, baby car chases, which most of them are anyways, but now only person to person fights to. Oh, that's such a bummer. Oh, my God. Interesting. Well, I mean, I guess that I'm surprised it didn't have an earlier but yeah, I mean, if you're watching Marvel movies, those are all going to pretty much be CIA fights anyway. And if you're watching the Fast and Furious movies, I am shocked when somebody when I tell somebody you know, that's not a real car. There's no real cars in the scene. You're watching a cartoon. And they're like, What are you talking about? When the camera goes flying around the car like this? Stop and say, Well, how did they do that? Practically? They didn't you know, that's a that's an effect. And so I don't know, they'll probably get it in a couple of years to look fairly normal, I guess. Well, yeah, there's also the, I mean, along those similar lines, but even more insane is the Terminator, remake or sequel or whatever that's being done by a bunch of AI people. That is going to be shown in a theater not as like ah got released but as a promo night thing. So, yeah, I saw that Tyler Perry put the kibosh on his studio that he was building once he watched Oh, yes, that new AI program called, or, or something like that I'm filled with an S surah. Yes, sir. And people are complaining about this, but what are you supposed to do when you're about to sink? You know, $60 million into a studio or something, and you see something like this happen? And it's just a, it's just a bottom line thing? What is the guy supposed to do? People are giving him flak. And I'm like, This guy has done so much for the black cinema community. Oh, we're gonna, we're gonna force him to not take advantage of what everybody else is going to be taking advantage of. Yeah, he's single handedly started the, you know, the cinematic lever over in Atlanta. And he produced the first studio system over there, which, you know, obviously, is a whole industry now. So you can't I don't want to give him any shit, that's for sure. Even if I do not enjoy his films on any level, no loser trash, but you can't deny the fact that he has put an awful lot of people to work he has he has. So I get it. Like, you know, there's nothing wrong with taking a beat and going you know what, let me see how this shakes out before I spend a zillion dollars on something that might end up not being profitable. Plus, he's largely an independent, he's kind of Kaufmann, where it's pretty much his own money. He's probably putting in more than anybody else's, as opposed to a studio, which is just a giant business machine now anymore. So especially when you see the stuff like the the the Acme movie that's going to be shelled experts. Oh, yeah. Oh, you start realizing, you know, okay, these guys, there's, there's no artistic merit to anything they're doing, it is all about bottom line. And if they can get a bigger tax break out of it than they think they'll get out of the box office, that's what they're going to take. Yeah, Warner Brothers specifically has been a trash fire of like, economic deciding lately, and I knew people over at adults who have games, I had worked on a title that ended up with them, and used to do a bunch of trailers for them. And yeah, they're like, Warner Brothers really fucked over a bunch of developers this week to over the inline about it anyways, it's a whole big thing. So a lot of these companies are making financial specific decisions. And as AI continues to change and evolve, we're gonna see some weird shit going on. Well, it's gonna be impossible. I see what they're doing, like what Apple is doing with their new phone, or even androids now I saw commercial for Samsung, I think, where somebody is taking a picture of a concert, and the person in front of them gets in the way. And then I think we just tap on the person and AI takes them out of the field. So crazy. Oh, my God, when you hand that to people, that's, that's basically propaganda. In positive form for AI, you're not going to be able to tell people it's not good when it starts doing stuff that they like. It just reminds me of, I took a photography class in college, and there was a Vietnam War photographer who is our teacher. And he talked about this one photo that he had seen that was altered of that school protest shooting from the 70s. And he complained and was like, there was a telephone pole that used to be sticking out of this person's behind this person's head. And somebody doctored it out. And he was like, You can't do that. There's like a real moment that exists that is historical that you cannot do that. It's so unethical. And so they they actually retracted it and put the photo back out as originally taken. And now that's just no one cares. And that's crazy. That's crazy how much the world has changed in you know, 1015 years that this is whatever everywhere that the I mean, to scroll through Facebook and Instagram, there's barely an ad now that doesn't have some AI imagery in it. There was that big controversial religious commercial during the Super Bowl, but the washing of the feet and I'm watching his gone these all look like mid journey created images. Well doctored and well put together but I'm going if they're not somebody needs to go back to their photo developer and tell them to stop giving that fake weird sheen, that mud journey creates it because it's all over that commercial. And that's what $7 million they had. I mean, they're they're paying for the spot, not for the actual Content apparently. And you know, and I know that this is going to be showing up on YouTube. And I will say for people out there who who may have noticed recently that when you do a YouTube search, there's a huge slew of AI created YouTube content. And it's, it's wild, it's wild, if you try to look up best of whatever best lawn mower best, you know, best movies from 2024, you know, whatever it is, you are going to get the probably the first five to 10 results are not real videos, there. Yeah. And some of them have what look like real people talking as well. And it's not, they're not real people. So just watch out for that. I will say just a little heads up from one video content creator, to our listeners out there and viewers. Just keep on your keep on your toes don't believe what you see. Well, one of the things that I've been getting poo pooed, about when I say you know, this is this is literally the beginning of the end of the of Western civilization with this stuff. And it's not because the terminators are going to come get us. The way AI will destroy humanity is we'll all be driven insane because the existential realization that you don't know if what you're seeing is real anymore, is going to start preying on people's brains, and we'll all go mad as a society. We're just leaving the uncanny valley we're just going to live in and that is pretty bad. That is a pretty bad place to be so. Well, that was our show. Thanks, guys. Thank you. Send this moment to you. And this is definitely real. This is definitely real people in a real room. So where's it? Shall we? Shall we talk about some fun stuff? Some movies and stuff we've seen? Yes, please. Well, I I watched fast X, Eric. Oh my God, what did you find on the times it? Well, it's on HBO max or No, maybe it's on prime? I don't know what's what's on streaming for nothing. And I was so blown away by how stupid it was. Yeah. I just sat there, you know, with my mouth hanging open. I don't want to say that Vin Diesel is the worst actor on the planet. But he better hope that guy doesn't die. Because he's next in line is. So God awful Anytime he's required to act against his son. And that poor kid has really given it his all I feel like the yield cut, and that kid is just like, I can't work with his fucking asshole. Right, dad? It's gone. Man, really, really bad. The one thing I liked though, was what's his name? Aquaman. Yeah, playing the villain playing the villain. Everyone told me you know, oh, I hated how flamboyant and all this stuff he was. That was like, that's part of. I don't know that he was flamboyant. But he was certainly having a good time as a bad guy. I think he's the best villain they've had in The Fast and the Furious movies since they became superhero films. Yeah, for sure. A lot of fun. He was the best part of the movie. Easily. I mean, you know, we're talking about Bruno Mateo getting $150 million film here by now. They're just ridiculous. The last so two events. So it ends on a cliffhanger. I like oh my god, you guys. Boy. They're really wrong. Every drop out of this. And they have a huge problem because Paul Walker died in the middle of what? Seven? Yeah. And instead of killing him off in between movies or something, they have decided to keep him alive. But nobody realized they were gonna make five more movies without him. And they have to explain his disappearance each time and it gets stupider and stupider. They're not trying to hide this from him because he wanted out. But his wife and son are somehow still involved and he's not getting involved. This is just it. It's mind blowing ly dark. Yes. I have no argument against that. I just wanted I just wanted to say it. Wow. Yeah. Um, well, you you mentioned a really terrible film. I'm gonna one up you. I right here right now. Okay. I saw madam Webb. You did? I did. In the theater in the theater. I used a precious precious date night to go and see Madame Webb this is value for value people. She Yes, she's suffering for you guys. You better send some money our way. I you know what, I am so glad I heard from so many people about how bad it was gonna be So there were no surprises on that front. Other than it was so bad. It was so fucking funny. I couldn't believe it like. So luckily, like we went to a theater. And of course, Madam Webb's been out for a hot minute. And so there was not another soul in there. So me and Austin just talked the entire way through it. And it was so glorious. It was like, Oh, my God, they're loops are not even moving. And they're just words. They're just words coming. Wow, the villain is dubbed through the entire thing. And it's like with a really bad accent. And I'm like, I don't know if this is the same actor or if they made him do a different performance or what is happening. There are there there's nothing in it. That makes sense. There's not a single decision that has value that carries from the beginning to the end. You just want to murder the main character. She's so unlikable, and she looks like she does not want to be there. I mean, as a character, not the actress, but the character is such a dick. And she's just like, I don't know what the fuck, I'm helping you guys. And you're like, why are you helping? What are you doing? What is What does any of this mean? No one's decision making makes any sense whatsoever. And the, to the level that I just want to point out, just like one little example of this, we have those three young girls that are hanging out with her that are part of the spider verse, that you can see that they've got the costumes and right. We never at the end of the movie, we they don't have any superpowers. They don't have names. We don't know what super people they are. We just have a vague sense that they will eventually one day become super people. Which one's who knows? Who said this? Because I have questions. And since we're talking spoilery on this. Yeah, I heard that. Like we see those costumes throughout the trailer. Yeah. And that the only time that happens is in like some kind of dream sequence. Yes. Well, that is true. Yes. So the main villain, for reasons unknown a, he has the ability to see the future, kind of, I think, because of superpowers that are not explained to us. And he's dreamed slash seen how he will die. And it is via these three super people. So we see that flash, and so his decision is to make sure he kills them first. But he waits until they all meet each other as like normal teenage girls and decides oh, I'll just offer them all at once. Instead of just being like, I'm just going to figure out like one at a time. Right? When they're vulnerable. And not around anything useful like another person with super powers. No, he's like I look I can't even I can't even begin there are so many nonsensical things about this film. Also like the birth of spider man but not named. Isn't this as a background plot point? Like we meet the the main character her her co worker is Ben and they never say his last name. And then he has a nephew that's born him they never sit and then like there's there's weird moments where it's like oh, well my mom died but I'm sure that will happen to you. This then takes place 15 years before Spider Man or something something I miss it's set in 2003 I think or 2005 for literally no reason literally no reason. Well, I guess I could see if they're going to show the birth of spider man that then the next movie can take place in the present day with them already established as heroes or something like that. But I I really want not Yeah, I really wonder who's who's kind of overseeing the spider verse thing for Sony and, and green lighting stuff like this. It's awful and like I have zero faith in any other projects cuz I mean, I already didn't have any faith in Sony projects, but like this is fucking bad. This is like Unreal. Who left the script out the door and gave like any format of money to it. I recommend watching it it's fucking hilarious. It is the weirdest movie i think i've ever I mean, it's one of the weirdest movies I've ever seen. So well. The next one is Craven the hunter so yeah, oh, going to ending it's gonna keep going. I was planning on waiting for this to do max or whatever it'll end up on to see it and watching it entirely in the mind if it is an utter disaster, and I'm using language fastex Yes. Yes. I cannot wait. Eric, I just want you to, I want to hear your response Upon seeing how the bad guy dies. Because there as it's so precious. It's so precious. Eric if you if you don't watch any other superhero movies, and then you start watching again with this, I'm going to be very upset with you. Set the bar low one. Give me a recent good one. Wow. You cannot speaking of bad movies, let me pull us back to the kind of bad movies we should enjoy from the arrow video store back sent me that. That's lovely. That is lovely. Featuring arena, which is the one I've watched so far from 1989. Right. You remember that one? Kelly? That's the that's the BloodSport in space with aliens. Yeah, exactly. Where a human hasn't been a champion for like 30 years or something. And then this guy goes on. Yeah, it's, it's bad. But it's the right kind of bad. Obviously, you didn't save this and make us use this as a sub genre some time because it's actually kind of fun. Oh, it is. Yeah, it's fun. It's. That's interesting. It's really, really good for most of it, but it suffers from that same thing somebody bad movies do where it starts off really fun and stupid, and ends really fun and stupid. But there's a large portion in the middle where it tries to pretend it's trying to tell a story. As opposed to it's just weird fighting. And it's got odd aspects of it. Like when they're they have rays that shoot from the ceiling that hit the fighters that adjust their fighting levels. So it's supposed to make the fighting more even. Like, if you have that, why wouldn't you have have another human that can beat the crap out of a giant creature? Because they're supposed to be equal. Robot destroy him? Exactly. Yes. But asking so many questions, human. The alien outfits are really fun, because they're frequently really bad. But they're done with somebody gave a shit about the work they were doing. They just didn't have the budget to make it look really smooth. Because there's some strange creature design and they're really kind of one guy is even kind of adorable. One of his sparring partners. He has at one point that sort of looks like a giant slug but has weird short arms. But as used as a fighting partner. But that, I mean, yeah, this has stuff like dolls. Stuart Gordon. That's a great movie. Yeah, robot jocks. Oh, that's fine. Dungeon Master. Has what are what is the end? What is this? boxset called? Yeah, the arrow video store. It's got like an image of a video store on the front of it. Like, you're going to rent the movies. And it's all late 80s Direct video kinda Ashlock and how many movies are in it? Seven now, six, six. That's a lot of extras and all that stuff. Oh, yeah. Ridiculous. Just like, you know, all these boutique stuff. Do let's treat this weird as movie like it's the most glorious film ever put out? That's because that's always fun. Nice. So excellent. That was my first one because I enjoyed watching that bad movie now. Oh. I kept my Jason Momoa double feature going Vanessa by watching Aquaman and the last kingdom. Ah, which another head scratcher I was thinking how the hell did this get greenlit? I couldn't figure out what the fuck was happening through most of it. Yeah, and that one point. I was like, Oh, well, shit. Alright, at least it's almost over and I paused it because I was gonna go to the bathroom and it was like, No, there's an hour left Kelly. I was like, simply be an hour left in this. And it's just stupid. Yeah, shit. Yeah, it was. It was so dumb. I was starting to feel really bad for Jason Momoa I'm like this. This must have been my highest Hey. Oh, he he he must have gotten so much money this last year between fastex and Aquaman. But oh yeah. His career. It can't just be ever The bad movie that comes out. I know because he's really fun. He's like just a really fun actor to to watch. So it is a bummer when that happens. But, man, I can't believe you sat all the way through Aquaman like at least I sat through it in the theater. I can't imagine getting through it at home. Well, not only did I do that, then I decided I was going to for whatever reason Oh, is because of snow day. Just stuck in the house. I watched Zack Snyder cut of Justice League again. Wow. Oh, let me tell you guys this. Okay. That movie is not good. But every movie that has come out since then, is so bad. That if you watch Justice League again, it's actually a fucking masterpiece, converting everything else. Yes, come to the dark side. I was just stunned. Because I'm watching it go. And I remember thinking this movie was so so at best. And it's so much better than Aquaman and Wonder Woman and everything else that I sat there I'm like, I think I might have to become a Zack Snyder Fanboy and, and ask them to reinstate his version of the film's again or something? I don't know. Yeah, for sure. I know. That's exactly how I felt when I watched the Justice League and was comparing it to the previous Justice League. It was like fuck, there was like intention. There's really character development. on any level. This is thrilling. Honestly. It really is a very soso movie but in comparison, it becomes like Brava. Brava. Yes, shot decisions like you thought about where the camera is gonna go before you put hate record. Well done. I keep thinking that I have been corrected my decision of passing on so many recent. Yeah, you really have. I just feel like I'm so committed at this point. There's no going back. It's like, No, I've already. I've just got to watch them all. Now. There's just I'm so far in the shit. You know why? Why get choosy? Speaking of which, so I watched a film actually. You really liked and I? I don't know. I'm almost like embarrassed to talk about it. Yay. So, Spaceman on Netflix. Yeah. So this is the new Adam Sandler sci fi movie, which I put on thinking the last time I opened up an Adam Sandler movie it was who be Halloween and I bailed within a 10 minute 10 minute period. So I was very, very ready to just get out of there if need be. But this is a fairly serious film. It's not as a schlocky slapstick piece. It's a sci fi piece, and it's I don't even want to I just don't want to spoil it. But I will say there's it's so fucking good. And it has such literal like little wonderful surprises. And it ends up really making you think about like life and our place in the universe and life. And it's, it's pretty unassuming. It's basically just one guy trapped in like a tin can floating through space. But yeah, it has some of that, but it's way more lighthearted. Like, I don't want to give it away. But there's there's an element to it. That is just so weird and random that you just are like what the fuck is happening, but this is delightful. So I don't know I I'm about 20 minutes into it. And I have hit that element. And I I was almost hoping that something like this wouldn't happen just because I think Adam Sandler is a really good actor in his in his serious and dramatic roles. Yeah. And I thought, oh, no, is this going to turn goofy? So you're telling me it does not turn goofy? No, I don't think so. I think it maintains like there's humorous moments throughout for sure. But like the Yeah, I liked it. I liked it a lot. I gave it a four and a half star on letterbox. So wow, it's Yeah, it really is. It was just super. I don't know, heartwarming to me. So and that's called Spaceman. Spaceman on Netflix. Sorry, I have to I could potentially talk about one. Yeah, was because you know, I'm staying at mother in law's house. The other one of the darkest, more disturbing films I've seen in a long time. Now Do you have a preference? No God, what else have we got to do? Talk about both of them. Yeah, well, the first one, the family friendly one on Netflix was the 90s. I think romantic comedy it could happen to you. Oh, icons page. Right? He Tips The waitress. Yeah, he had sir a lottery ticket. Right? I don't have a tip. So but if I win the lottery, I'll come back. If I don't, I'll give you a tip. If I win, I'll give you half. And it's got Rosie Perez being unbelievably annoying. For 90 minutes as his current wife that's fun. As dumb is what it is. It's weird seeing Nicolas Cage again just be an actor. Yeah, he's still good, but he is just an actor in acting like a romantic comedy guy. Yeah, Moonstruck and all that kind of stuff. All right, the other one. When you blind buy from companies like vinegar syndrome and Severan. Every once in a while you watch something you're like, oh, shit, I want to delete this movie from my brain animal. And they had one this time called Hot spur. Spur and their description is their description on the website. Having struck gold was shocking entries like ego and Mondo bizarro producer Bob Creasy and writer director and Louis fraught Lee frost applied their sleeves aesthetic to revenge Western advertised as 90 minutes of Freudian fury. Oh my god, it's so redefined. The roughy be named one of the top 10 movies of 1969 by conservative publication National Review, and become one of the most notorious exploitation films in history. So you read that? Yeah, yeah, I'll watch that. And then you watch it go. Wow, roughy is an understatement i for both familiar with the term roughy with me I am not okay, there's the nudie cuties which are like the volleyball movies and shit like that I didn't have those weird things that came out the 50s and 60s to work naked people in the movies. Then there's the rough ease. And the rough ease were a series where there was violence, and sex combined. Sometimes subtly, and just like a jello kind of way. Nothing. Deeply horrible, but truly disturbing. This is rough. This one's really really a hard watch and got to the end go on. I could have done without that. I did watch the whole thing. But of course it's really short. But it's just not pleasant. There's the revenge sort of works but sort of doesn't because there's two revenge stories going on. The one of the racist treated Mexican guy ran when when runs, okay. The one with one of the women that gets attacked runs more complete, but she's also kind of an awful character, the movie. It's just like that, like anybody in this movie. They're all awful. They're all terrible. And I don't feel like I'm better for having viewed it. This Oh, 1969 and it bothered you this much? Oh, yeah, I was uncomfortable. Just the the sexual violence is a lot. You know, you watch a bunch of the full CI films and all this stuff like that young person. Okay. That's uncomfortable. I don't like that scene in this scene was like, kept building on them. And the acting's good enough at times, there's forgot the names, but one of the lead actors has, like hundreds of credits. One of those guys has been in everything. But, and everybody's just mean nasty. I would say if you haven't ordered it from Severan doubt. Sorry, seven. You know, I love you to come on. This one. You got to have a certain mentality, I guess to watch it and of course now I'll probably go watch and the related film that came out to the same with the same time is it next just the scavengers? Oh, we'll see. We'll wait a while. That sounds like a freezer film to me. Yeah, that's what I was just gonna say. Hey, do you guys have time you want to go another round because I saw something I'd like to talk about, sir. Yeah. Dammit, Vanessa. If you weren't right about waka Wonka was an absolute delight. and I still don't like Timothy Shalem. I don't like the way he looks. But I loved his acting in this. And he he really sold the idea of gene Wilder's Willy Wonka before he became bitter. And I thought it was just I thought the music was fantastic. The sets were fantastic. I mean, it is definitely a movie for kids. But there's so much going on in the background characters that had me laughing hysterically. And I I really, really enjoyed it. And so thank you for even putting it on my radar as because i There's no way I would have watched this movie if you hadn't said how great it was. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, this one totally took me by surprise as well just threw it on because my mom was over helping babysit. And I was like, We got to have a mom friendly movie. And I was like, hot Diem is the really good film. And of course, as I mentioned before, if anyone out there knows about the Paddington movies, Paddington one and two, both unbelievably strong, kids films, great writing, really a lot of heart. Weirdly, weirdly good movies. I started with the second one, which also has Hugh Grant in a strange role. And yeah, that that kind of was a good initial clue that Wonka was not going to just be a cash grab it. It seems like somebody out there just really cared about every part of this. Boy, no kidding. The I mean, it really adds a lot to the idea of Willy Wonka. It's not just a origin story. In fact, I then went and watched the Gene Wilder movie again. And that's not a movie I've ever really loved. But I liked it and everything and I I liked it again this time, but not as much as I liked Wonka. Yeah, yeah. I wonder if I can convince the mother in law to watch that one. I bet she like it. Yeah, it was adorable. Um, well, I saw the other Timothy Sharlyn. A top 10 film of the recent box office. Timing. So did either view check out dune to dune part two. Now I haven't been able to break away long enough. It's killing me. Well, I didn't like I didn't like the first one enough to Sure. Okay. Yeah, you have to I think you really have to enjoy like the universe. Did you really just say that? I mean, come on. Look at my movie now of can you do reverse? No. I won't say much anyway, other than you know, yet again. Michelle villain who is become just one of my favorite directors. He's just, I mean, I think I actually like doing one maybe a little more. This one is still incredible. I mean, it's it's very much on par. It's just whether or not you like that part of the story. But visually, fuck, man, that guy if you need something that's large scale and otherworldly. There is no one else on planet Earth who's going to know how to do it like he just there's a lot of scenes on the her Conan Homeworld that I was just it just looking at them. I was filled with like, angst and gross SNESs and fear and terror and like the just unsettled just looking at their home planet. It was just like, fuck that police. Like this is awful to stare at. But he is because he got it. So right. So yeah, I mean, the this is very much another part of the dune book. The only spoiler I would give is that some people have said oh, it goes into the second dune book. It does not. It's still part of Dune one. And also, yeah, just, there's definitely gonna be a third one. So it's good stuff. I would check it out. Specifically, if you're going to do it, do it in the theater. High School. I saw it, I could see it in your eyes and what you're doing there. Don't take the random things I say and make it wrong. It's never intended that way. Okay, then I'll move quickly along to my phone which is fairly sexless. So you're good. A Walk in the Woods. One or two this one? No. Hey, thanks. During the cast breakdown, Robert Redford, Nick melty, me Emma Thompson, Nick Offerman, Christian Sal. So cast is good. Yeah. Wait years this is 2015. So a little while ago, based on a Bill Bright Bryson book of when he walked the or tried to walk, or did he walk, did he fully walk or whatever, the Appalachian Trail of course, he was in his 40s. And the, the two lead actors are significantly older than their 40s for this. But basically, that's what the story is just these two guys going off to, to walk the trail just to see what happens to them. Filled with this large amount of unexpected humor. A lot of it kind of, like filthy too. But it's just a fun, nice movie that we were this was we watched this, I think the first or second night after being in the hospital with Marty. And like, you know what, we need something completely innocuous and just nice and pleasant. And this was a perfect film for that. So if you're, if you're going you know what the world sucks. I'm sick of this crap. I just watched Hotspur. I'm gonna watch a walk in the woods. And, you know, totally recommend it all. Nice, probably probably largely forgettable. I mean, you look at the letterbox rating and it's a perfect pyramid. Not in the high, not in the low. Everything's in the middle. But had fun. It was well worth checking out. Especially under circumstances where your brains like I don't want to think about bad shit. On your stream that okay, Netflix. Okay. Walk in the Woods. Well, alright, guys, should we think about wrapping this up? Or did you want to talk about anything else? Vanessa? Why are you looking at me? Because I know that you have watched a shit ton of stuff. And I just don't. I am at the point now where with this little one I'm watching like one to two movies a day. It's It's unreal. It's literally unreal how much crap I am getting through like whole TV shows. Yeah, I mean, let's let's just wrap it up. Let's just wrap it up. There's too many things I can't talk about. I got a quick couple thank yous. We got Ron out there who's now become a monthly reoccurring pizza buyer for us. Ron, thank you so much. And somebody named Glenda Lynn. believe she had a message for Kelly. But she also purchased some pizzas for us. So I'm do send a nice thank you out to her. I spoke with my mother last night. And she even said did you get my message? I have to call me every once in a while. Thank you, Mom, I told Eric to just decline all of your payments from now. And also, from my mom, she left this, I will be bringing it. I will be bringing it to the next time we all see each other. So thank you for however many pizzas this gets you. Dining room table. Yeah, that's so so well. If if anybody else wants to get in on that they can. They can buy us a pizza, or you go to the website, there's various ways if you want to give us some money, you can do that. By some pieces. One of them the recurring payments that happened through Pay Pal is another one. And then the the value for value system just is if you feel like you need to send us something that's great. But it also includes liking and sharing the posts and commenting something on the YouTube videos apparently helps the algorithm quite a bit. Yeah. So that's really cool. When when I see people doing stuff like that. I have a book coming out shortly. The secret language of spiders in a couple of months. That'll be on my website written by kale young.com. And anything else we should be promoting. I know crypto con is coming up very quickly. We have Alright, we've submitted the connoisseur towards first film festival. Oh, phone bat. Oh, nice. And I just sent the two of you a edit with some audio changes and some stuff like that. So we're really getting pretty close. And hopefully it'll start showing up in a lot of film festivals around the area with a lot of people who are really strange to show their film. I do not know who this film is for no offense guys, but It's all very good. Hopefully we're getting selected to be there. Well, that's very cool too. All right, guys, I'm really glad we did this because I was gonna be bummed to miss you. So we have a, we have an Amityville episode that probably aired prior to this one, right? Is that what's going on? Eric or I hadn't really figured that out. That's how I was thinking about we're watching this I called to attach this to the beginning of Amityville, or do I do a short little release? That, you know, that'd be kind of fun to probably do that then it might make I don't I still don't think it'll be long as the last time you fill out episode we just put out it's like a 90 minute plus podcast. But the the next one is Tony Kaye makes his return because he really wanted to talk about was it Emeryville? To right decision? Yes. So coming up next. Enjoy the next episode of the latest. Just an old episode of The Amityville Horror Picture Show. Alright guys, well, I can't wait to see you guys next week. And then we'll be talking about the the Charles extra awards. Excellent. All right. Love you guys. I'll see you soon. Bye. The Amityville Horror position, 3d Science strange aeons radio presents The Amityville Horror Picture Show. That's Eric and I am Kelly and we are your hosts on this very strange journey of the Amityville film franchise of which there are now 40 movies holy. This is kind of a special episode because we spoke about Amityville to the possession last episode with Carlos Zamora. But we knew we had to get somebody in who actually loves this film to talk about it. And that is the guy who holds the record for recurring guests with two episodes already as we get into Episode Two. Yeah, it's Anthony James K. Well, thank you very much for hosting me, gentlemen. I really appreciate it. And I do remember having had the honor of you know guesting on the very first Amityville Horror Picture Show podcast and talking about the first movie. I had mentioned to you guys offhand how much I appreciated the second movie. And of course, you were wanting to do a rotating guest star thing and my heart sank slightly when you said someone else is going to do animated Amityville, too. And that I thought, when you came back and asked me to come back and talk about it, I was like, yay. So thank you for the opportunity. You may regret saying that because maybe you'll be doing an addendum on every episode. Once we get past four, I'm going to be as helpless as anybody so but yeah, with this one? Well, so really quick to remind everybody we're talking about Amityville Horror to the possession. The night of February 5 1976, George and Kathleen Lutz and their three children fled their home in Amityville, New York, and never returned. For them. The horror was over. The living nightmare shocked audiences around the world and the Amityville Horror. But before then, another family lived in this house and were caught by the original evil the Lutz's escaped with their lives, but the previous owners weren't so lucky. Father, by signing home and watch over as this will become a part of this until the family it was the dream house until it turned into a nightmare. What was in this house what evil could drive their son to madness and destroy everything and every one he loved? No. empty field to the possession The session 90 needed to it had a budget of 5 million a box office of 12 point 5 million and the Rotten Tomatoes critic score of 16% Directed by a Damiano Damiani. It is very loosely based on the book murder and Avenue Ville by Hans Holzer. And from there I think maybe we just start talking to Tony and see what he wants to say about this film recommend going back and listening to the previous episode, you'll learn all about the movie and what we thought of it. And now you can learn on about excellent Well I'm happy to fill in any sort of perceived or actual blanks here. i As you know, this is a low, low, low, low fucking bar, but I think that Amityville to the possession is the best movie of the Amityville series at least the ones the fraction of sequels that I've seen so far. The first thing that I thought about is that like most of the movies in the series, it's not a great movie in fact, it may be isn't a particularly good movie it's silly as fuck it's a subtle as a sledgehammer it is wildly uneven. I mean, one minute, it's an extra sleazy after school special the next minute, it's this really harrowing exploitation horror movie with an especially gruesome family massacre scene and then it's a courtroom drama, and then it's a fucking exorcist rip off. In fact, I was telling Eric on the way over here that I would not be surprised if you Kelly had branded this in your inimitably terse but elegant way, eloquent way, a turd? I actually kind of love this movie. Oh, beautiful. Only because Eric and I have seen the original Amityville Horror, far too many times. We are in agreement that we just don't think it's a very good film. Yeah, it does not deserve the incredible reputation that it seems to have. Yeah. And then we watched this one, I'd seen it back in 82. I think I remember being kind of disappointed with it. But on the rewatch, I was like, This is so much better than the original. Oh, I know. And I think it's, well, one of the things that really is the key to it. The basic criteria of a horror film is to honor unnerved and disturb you and on that front. I think this movie of all the ones at least that I've seen so far really hits the nail on the head on that in that department. It is legitimately unnerving, legitimately disturbing. And I think even despite and kind of maybe even a little bit because of some of its liabilities, it still packs a really strong punch. It's it's so sleazy. That's what you mean by unnerving? Yes, the scene where the brother and sister sit down and get to know the house is so uncomfortable right off the bat. God I know there's you know, that's one of the things that fascinates me is that you've got all of this stuff kind of seething underneath the surface. And one of the things that I really think separates this from most of the other Amityville movies is that it's got this ready willingness to just dive headlong into some extremely dark and disturbing places. And that you know, wedded with its frequent flashes of visual style and the fact that it doesn't make a lick of fucking sense half the time. The thing is, and this is probably I didn't realize it when I first saw it at the time, but this feels very Italian. And as you know, there's good reason for that because you have Damiana Damiani Who was your kind of arch typical Italian journeyman director he helped sword and sandal movies. He did a really good spaghetti western called bullet for the general from 1967. He also did a bunch of Italian crime dramas the Palacio, Tesh Tashi, Palacio Teskey movies, and he also did at least one really good 1966 Gothic horror movie called The witch with Richard Johnson from the original haunting. Plus he's working with Director of Photography who like actually did camera work on Dario Argento is third movie for flies on gray velvet, really underrated an excellent JLo called who saw her die and then he shot the arthouse hit the postman Al Pacino. So this guy's got some range, you know, and he also shot fucking the original and glorious battered bastards and Conan the Destroyer. And then on top of that, you've got the production designer who designed don't torture a duckling, a great leader and Cleef spaghetti. So he basically he's working with all these other Italian creative people, and one of the uncredited screenwriters who did an extra pass on the screenplay is starred Dan Oh, so chatty, who fucking wrote Lucio Fulci movies? Yeah, yeah, he wrote a blog he wrote zombie he wrote both To the demons movie. So, this is a guy who is no stranger to helping concoct, like fever dream Italian movies that don't make a huge amount of sense. But still, like really stick with you. If you read between the two writers. This feels a lot lot more like dominoes than Tommy's. Yeah, I know. And that's and I'm sure you probably brought this up in the previous episode, but I you know, this is like totally, Tommy Lee Wallace. his wheelhouse became doing like these kinds of subversions of sequels to like, restore established intellectual properties. Yeah, but I don't remember him going so sleazy before No, and that is that is actually I'm sure, you know, that is from the contributions in the hands of screenwriters. Which is ironic because I think Damiani wanted to go like even harder on all of the on all of the sleazy elements the in the original cut of the movie, the scene where Sonny seduces his sister is a lot longer and a lot more graphic. It's not just him kissing her it's like pretty much reportedly you know, everything. And then also I don't know if you talked about this in the first episode also but there was a very graphic anal rape scene removed from the movie after Jeep big surprise preview audiences kind of weren't fond of watching Britannia all the gets sodomized by Bert young. And surprise, surprise, seeing a more graphic version of a sister getting you know, getting, you know, hit on hard by her brother. You may be test audiences in mainstream America would not quite be so fun to that. But I but I actually, you know, I think again, you know, it comes down to there. There are all these floating around to this rather overwrought and cheesy, you know, nests of a movie or a lot of really, like interesting and memorable things. I I didn't this is one of the few kind of movies in that time period that I didn't actually see first run in a theater. I caught it on VHS a few years later. And I just remember being struck by its weirdness, you know, and now I realized that all of these things that made it so strange and so strangely memorable, you know, the the crazy quilt of genres colliding this operatic fever, emotional pitch, all the really stylish visual detours it takes, and its readiness to dive into all the grotesquerie and the very skeptical stink guy at levels at the Catholic Church. This is all very distinct to Italian cinema, you know, Italian genre cinema. And it's funny because I don't think it's Italian. This really hit home for me until I think maybe 10 or 11 years ago, when I actually revisited it for the first time, prepping for actually the crypto Con panel interview that I did with Diane Franklin, you know, the lady who plays Trish in the movie. And one of the things that really struck me one of the other things that really struck me watching it this time out is that the actors I think in the end are what really sell the movie for me because I think they all I mean, we're talking to a great extent a lot of like cartoon archetypes, but the actors do them very well. I was really especially struck by how good Jack Magner was, because Jack Magner who plays Sonny the the murder of the family and the oldest son is so creepily effective. He is so full throttle, that you know that this this role probably fucking completely torpedoed his career. The only other movie he did after this was he played the young soldier whose feed got set on fire by Drew Barrymore in the original Firestarter. Right nothing else. I was wondering if you had any insight on that because he is pretty. He's overacting. Yeah, yes, it is what's called for in the movie. Yeah, he's giving it his all though. He's definitely not sleeping through this part. Exactly. And what's really again, he is so intense and so intensely creepy that I that I really, I could like see him going into an audition, you know, and they're like, oh, let's get a look at this resume. Let's see last stroll. mass murdering demon possessed creeper lorises wide eyed kid sister, the incessant K, you know, that's not going to that's the kind of thing that can, in a rare instance, be a case of doing a job to well, reportedly, he is now he retired from acting right after doing Firestarter and I forget what he did in the interim, but most recently it was reported that he is now apparently a school principal somewhere in the Boston area at a Boston Public School wild interesting but I I've always I mean, you know, and his performance again, because it's it's such a fever pitch. It feels Italian. And there are points there there are points in time where the combination of just the the like wide eyed scary ass look on his face. and just a little bit of pale makeup on his face and the slight asymmetric nature of his teeth as he smiles wide and looks at you, that just sends a chill down your spine. It's like seriously creepy, this guy is terrifying. I'm also, I'm also a big fan of Diane Franklin, who always always did a great job of playing kind of innocent girls next door and, you know, who get like horrifically put upon by some, you know, horrible, insane, something or other you know, and she's like, so unforced in her sweetness, you know, and her kind of wholesome girl next dourness that it makes this whole slide into incest all the more like blunt force disturbing and impactful and that's where it starts to feel like this really ultra gritty and grimy and sleazy after school episode after school special episode, you know, especially when there's that scene where she confesses and she comes running in Chicago, she goes running out, you know, and you know, the priest is like totally gobsmacked at what she's confessed. She looks back at him and there's tears welling in her eyes and you're just like, oh my god, this poor. Mom's reaction to is just oh god in Rudel. Absolutely. And it's you know, and it's interesting because those are little flashes of really kind of scary, hard to face truth amidst this fairy operatically pitched movie. And I've always had a soft spot in my heart for Tanya Alda, who plays Dolores, the matriarch of the family. And the thing that I love is that her performance is pitched. I mean it literally the first kind of scare scene that she sort of directly involved in, is when the sink that she turns on in the kitchen starts spewing. It looks like blood. I don't know it's rust. When she first turns it on her fucking eyes bugged out. She gets this larger than life reactions. I think she's screaming and you've got that fucking hammy ass Lalo Schifrin score shrieking away and she's like, her eyes are bugging out and she's screaming at this fucking faucet. And at least it's like I'm watching this and thinking that could be Catriona MacColl from a fucking filthy movie. She is doing Catriona MacColl from the beyond or something facing some crazy ass shit. I mean, it's, you know, and sometimes it even feels like Damiani was kind of embroiled in creating sort of a weird self aware satire. You know, it feels like some of this is not unintentional. I I thought she was quite bad in this. That's, that's the point. Her response to everything is the exact same that is true. That is very true. And on a 10 scale. That's why I said I have a soft spot in my heart for return yet, although not necessarily that this is a very virtuosic piece of work, but I can see I can see Damiani gone nice isn't big enough. It's not big enough. Give me more. You know, if he even spoke English, I think he I think he actually one of the things was he didn't speak English translators later. Yeah, exactly. But even if you think the movie is a worthless turd, and I'm a little disappointed you don't just because I wanted to hear you say turd. Today. I still and I think but I think I you know, the thing is, I think it sounds like you're kind of on the same page in the sense that there are still plenty of like scenes and sex setpiece sex pieces. While there is one big sex piece in the movie set to pieces that really connect the scene where I think it's either a loose curtain or a bedsheet floats around the kitchen and the camera follows it really fluid, like lands on that crucifix. Yeah, that's, that's great. And then the whole scene with the initial possession where Sonny is like screaming and the camera is like following him. It's like basically dive bombing him. Yeah. And he's any slumped over on the bed and he's laying down flat and then his stomach starts contorting with those great practical effects. And he's screaming and it's like, holy shit. And yeah, it those scenes really work with Nick Cage going, Man, I just wish I could do that. Maybe someday. Oh, man, we need an Amityville to the possession the remake with him in it and he needs to be playing. I don't care if he's way too old for the role he needs to be playing Sonny he needs to be getting possessed by the devil. And that initial possession has such a dream logic field shooting of it and I love how how the gun slowly floats out of his hand. Oh god I know. And the whole thing seems like maybe it was a dream because he's shooting a gun in the house the guns in the rifle racket down below or going off yet. There's no damage to the house when everybody comes back. Oh, and that's a really great point. You could really I mean, it's not a stretch at all to perceive of the entire movie as being a fucking fever dream. In fact, I sat there when I was watching it. You know what the movie felt like to me it felt like it felt like the fevered nightmare that the real life Butch DeFeo had during his first night in prison. That subconsciously nudged him into copping an insanity plea. Like this was his wildest dream that led to, you know, hit, you know, copping into sanity pleat that this was what was in his head, as he said, not guilty by reason of insanity. That's I, you know, it just has that like you. It's a great point, Kelly, it has that dreamlike quality, you know, and then the other scenes that I really are blown away by are the whole, like mindfuck of a sequence towards the end, where Sonny while he's possessed is peeling the skin off of his own body until there's this bald demon fully visible in all its pupil as I gapped tooth grotesquerie, you know, and at that point, I'm thinking, you can tell this sumbitch got an uncredited rewrite from a cat who wrote folchi movies. It's so fucking obvious. The other scene that I think, you know, they really could, quote unquote, deliver on, which is, you know, it's tragic to say it is actually the massacre itself, because it is really, really really harrowingly shot. And you can tell it's got this, it's got this very brutalist effectiveness. And you can tell it's by somebody who made a lot of very hard hitting Italian crime movies, and he shoots that whole scene with this merciless efficiency that's just really unsettling even though there's not a huge amount of blood in it. It really it's, it's like, I mean, those are the times when when Damiani you know, the set pieces are the times when he really like he really delivers. And it's always it's always stuck with me and I I watched it again, like three or four times prior to this and I was I kept on finding little visual touches and little, little turns that made me go whoa, this movie's got more going on then. I feel like maybe Damiani had no real concept of what an American audience especially one that's been trained with the hero's journey and three extra structure exactly would know and appreciate because by the time what is boy's name, it's not sunny, it's sunny. He a time he's killed his family. We have seen that entire family be the worst examples of humanity and you know, like AI. All of these people deserve to die. Even the kids are pretty awful. And Bert young just starts off at 10 right from the beginning you're standing the world and He's terrifying. He is really genuinely terrifying in this movie, and it's and the whole build up is just again, it's it's a altra sleazy afternoon, you know after school special, like pitched at fucking Verity level operatic extremes and, and on that on that like over the top broadcasts level it really works. It's like it's like a lot of like, really harsh and uncomfortable realities. writ very, very, very, very, very fucking large. And I'd say after watching a bunch of jell O's or a few other Italian ones, you go into this going this is an American. Exactly. Or the other side like you're talking about walking in. Man, Jaws was so cool. I don't know if poltergeist came out the same year I don't know if it was released before that's a good question. I didn't check that and you you know you watch all that and you go oh, cool me well, what the fuck is this? Especially if there the stuff you said was cut out had been left in like cheese I would have not even for the factor of watching the movie uncut. I would have given anything to be sitting in that focus group audience when that movie fucking off, you know, on slotted them. It's like this, What must a mainstream, you know, middle America, you know, audience who's you know slinked into a preview screening on a whim for free at a mall or something. What did they fucking think when they saw this thing? And I was, you know, and I, when I was talking to Diane Franklin, in the interview, she talked about how how Damiani was a very sweet, boisterous, traditional kind of Italian guy, but that she also and the whole cast really got the sense that he, like every Italian Genre Director worth his salt really had a bone to pick with the Catholic Church. I mean, there's, there's the it is like not the least bit subtle about how completely fucking impotent the church is in the context of real I like true evil, it is interesting how the people the closer they get to the Vatican, the more vicious they are. And the more disconnect and the more like pull, you know, bureaucratic and political and push it all aside. Again, this is cheesy as shit writ in, you know, the most broad of strokes, but there's like this whole hierarchy that's like, you know, this is inconvenient Shut up, you know. And that's really you know, that's really interesting. The other weird part about the film is the trial segment, which you're thinking about the movie, that segment doesn't stick out so much as it's Oh, that was the same movie, was it? I know. And that's again, that's the thing at but that is again, as you know, being an inveterate watcher of trashy Italian horror movies. Yeah, and I both are as you know, that whole crazy quilt schizophrenic, you know, bouncing back and forth the yo yoing between, you know, family drama and exorcist rip off and courtroom drama and ultra sleazy sleazy after school special. That's so Italian. That's so Italian. Does that slingshotting back and forth? Question. So, first of all, the the murder scene happening when it does is so odd, because it feels like it should be the end of the movie. Oh, totally. Yes. And the way he murders them is so different than what we were told in the beginning of the first movie. Yeah. Is there a possibility that this is not a prequel but a sequel? Well, you know, it's interesting, because there is no direct reference to chronology in it, or the DeFazio day. Exactly. You know, I mean, that's, you know, I, part of it was I'm sure there was some concern legally. But yeah, I have always, that is something that actually occurred to me as I was watching it, too. I was thinking, it does chronology matter, and it kind of doesn't Oh, absolutely, it really doesn't in this movie. And I was also, it's also a very interesting testament to what happens when you know, you know, Hollywood is a game of telephone a lot of the time and a lot of the time it, especially back then when things weren't focused grouped and targeted to death. There was a time when all you had to do is own the name, own and intellectual property. And then it was like, You were kind of flying blind as to what the fuck you were gonna do with it next. And that's very much Well, I think what happened here and, and also, it's funny, he's not credited, but the dino dealer interest Corporation is who is who the movie copyright is under. It's a dealer entices kind of an uncredited executive producer and that guy, as you know, you know, whether it's a great movie, or whether it's a horrible, horrible movie, that guy leaves, like a very distinctive thumbprint on all the movies that he's financed or produced. It's a nice way of saying this has this has that it's got that Dino De La rentas. You know, I'm gonna I'm gonna make a big show. Whether it's good or not is immaterial, but I'm going to make a big ass show that just delivers on all this shit you're expecting it to deliver on? Well, and also, notice that this is Amityville, too. It's not the Amityville Horror to they Yeah, they don't own the name, right. Yeah. So yeah, I don't know if you discussed this with Carlos previously, but there was actually the Lutz family the original protagonist who suffered through the alleged Amityville Horror, actually sued the production company because they chose to make the movie loosely based on murder in Amityville, rather than the I think fictional book that came out Amityville Horror to which followed the Lutz's away from the house still experiencing like, paranormal phenomena and haunting. He sued because they were going to base it off of the fact base, you know, pre Amityville Horror Story. How How dare you say fictional story. Tony fun. I've got an open mind once in a while. I've got a note about that, that I made when we talked about that right in front of me where they they had to put on the poster had to say the film has no affiliation with George and Kathy Lutz. Yep. Because the losing that Yeah, well, yeah, what happened was they ended up the, the studio ultimately ended up prevailing and that was almost like that was basically something they tacked on at the end to make sure they had their asses covered because of course, legal bullshit can come you know, turning in on itself and it can become this snake eating its own tail. So they wanted to make sure they had all their all their bases covered. So hold on, you're saying that unlike the first one, this one is based on true story. Oh, wait a second. Let me unpack what he just said. A teenage teenager shoots his whole family to death. That's that's the story. That's the extent of the fact based but what's really interesting about this, ironically, is that there's a I was again, I was talking to Eric about this there's a film kicker named Ryan Katzenbach, who made this very exhaustive documentary about the DeFazio case, excuse me, it's posted on YouTube. And this this case is such an obsession for this guy Katzenbach that he put he has posted literally hours of tangentially and directly related extra footage related to the case. And that includes an interview with Alexandra halter, who's the daughter of Hans Holzer, the paranormal investigator who studied the first the Lutz family haunting and wrote murder anatomy Ville. And also, it's even got a 90 minute 2015 interview in jail with the real bush to fail the murder of his family as he serves out six consecutive life sentences. And yes, it's amateurishly and easily shot. And like I was saying, you know, it's got mediocre reenactments of the murders, it feels like some sort of fucking dollar store, you know, unsolved mysteries episode with Ed Asner narrating some of it, it's weird, but it's really It's fascinating. This guy, there's so much information here. And it was a whole, I got backtracked from actually, you know, researching the movie and kind of writing down my thoughts of the movie, by spending two nights at fucking YouTube watching all this stuff. And it's fascinating. I was and one thing that occurred to me is this is the kind of real life story that you could give a real director with a real budget and a list actors to and he could come up with something really fucking hard hitting and amazing, because this is one intense and labyrinthian case that just has so many strange turns. That it's it's worth, it's worth relating in a more straightforward fashion. That's an interesting thing that nobody has really put together a How did they do it? In medieval horror movie? Yeah. How do they? Well, DeFazio story has changed so often. This is very true. That's one of the many things that all of this stuff covers. Yeah. And, and his lawyer has admitted that he was the one who planted the idea of the voices in his head. Yep. And when that didn't quite work, his lawyer was the one who went to the Lutz's and came up with the Amityville Horror storyline. Yeah, it's it's, it's an interesting movie make you you know, that isn't interesting. It really somebody get on this, you know, the screenwriters who did Ed Wood and they you know, my name is dolomite. You know, they they seem to have a knack for doing movies about movies really well. So let's talk about so you're right the the courtroom scene flies by doesn't really stick with you. But what this does stick with me is the priest visiting him in jail and then breaking him out. Oh, God, I know. It's like really well, and that's there's a whole other there's like a whole other subtext that's going on there because James Olsen, who plays father Adamski, who's a really good character actor, he's the lead in the Andromeda Strain, right? He was terrific in that movie. And then the rest of his career. He kind of was basically in the background. He's playing, you know, grumpy generals and you know, the third lawyer on the right and shit, but he gets like a really good lead in this and he does a good work. I mean, he feels like an awkward but earnest. Anyway, well, attention priest, and the whole scene where he was between him taking all of this interest in sunny and between him and his friend, Father, Tom, go to a cabin together alone to camp. There's an interesting kind of homoerotic subtext to all that I think really straddles the line between homoerotic and superhome Oh, right. Oh, yes. And super ultra mega homoerotic. Yeah. And it's really and what's really interesting is it's almost like, it's almost like snuck in and it's, I think, again, it's some sort of comment on the church from from Damiani. Because what's the first thing that happens when Trisha tries in vain to call father Adamski to say oh my god, things are going you know things going nuts here. I really need your help, you know, jealous Father Tom walks up and hangs up the or pulls the phone off of the off of the cradle and just puts it down so that she's just talking to no one and they bolt out the door to go on their little romantic camping trip fishing. They're going fishing, fishing. Yeah, so it's, you've got all that stuff going on. It's very this is there's some really weird and interesting things that are just kind of sneaking through this whole movie. For all of that apparent dislike for the church, though he makes Adamski. Literally the only person you can root for in this film. Yeah, well, him and Detective Turner who becomes the sacrificial Negro and lets himself get knocked out so that the father Adamski could break Sonny out, right. And it's like Moses gun Moses gun is a fucking terrific character actor. I'm just one watching this and just thinking, you know, all this great actor he was like, the first to shaft movies and all these fucking amazing, like black oriented films from the 70s You know, he's basically reducing himself to hit me right here knock me out and then go you know, it's like what the fuck? That seems like an easy way to accidentally kill someone also. Oh god I know. Yeah hit me with a pistol but right there you who have never held a gun likely in your life right there I'm sure you'll get it just right and you won't. You won't cause a cerebral hemorrhage exhales no damage, no brain, no permanent brain damage. Nothing. Oh, another. Another little interesting bit of trivia is the first handyman who goes down to the muddy fly ridden stinky ass secret basement room is actually Danny Aiello, the third. He's Danny Aiello, son. I didn't know that. And he actually had a pretty illustrious career as a New York theater director. And sadly, he died in 2010. He was only I think, like 54 years old, but he died of pancreatic cancer. So his dad outlived him. Ironically. That's hard, rough. But anyway. Yeah, I mean, as far as kind of other aspects of the movie that struck me I, you know, it's it feels like, we've kind of covered an awful lot of it. And it sounds like between us, and you guys. And Carlos, you've pretty much picked a lot of this over. I think of all you know, I just I feel like just kind of in wrapping this up. All of the Amityville of all of the anime Amityville sequels this one, like, is really the one that for me, I just found myself, like more than any of the others that I've seen, and I've seen most of them more than once. I mean, I've seen the first Amityville Horror, like at least a half a dozen times, most of them usually like the first 80 7070s and 80s. Exactly. So I've seen so many. Yeah, exactly. But this one just always struck me because, again, there's so much stuff going on underneath the surface and in between the lines that is just not existent in the other movies. Not at all. One of the other footnotes and I guess this is skipping ahead is that both Diane Franklin and Bert Yan appear in a more recent movie called The Amityville murders, which I don't know if you've read about this one yet. I want the one with the Jennifer Jason Leigh. I'm not sure. But I do know it's the one that is supposedly based on the DeFeo case more directly and so ironically enough, Diane Franklin gets to play her mom in the movie, and Burt Young gets to play. Not sunny but the real life Butch to Fayose grandfather, the mafiosi in the new movie. She's, well I'm looking forward to getting to that one because I have skipped it. I think you can take one for the team on that one. I think I would have guesting on that one. I skipped ahead and seen some of these other ones and it is going to be a rough show going positive happiness there you go. Well bribed me with drinks and I may come back and help you out with a lot I'll tell you this needed I saw that Jennifer Jason Leigh one when it came out and it's quite good. Oh, so I was you know I was like wow, this is kind of cool shit and and then they did nothing with it because why would any legitimate company bother to put money into something that every everybody else can do for free? Yeah, there's just there's there's no ownership over this Amityville name. I want to talk a little bit about when Sonny goes back to the house. I love the scene where he's on the ceiling and drops down on on the pre sold totally. I thought that was a very cool scene. I understand why this is called an exorcist rip off since Adamski pulls a father Karis at the end. Oh, yeah. But having skipped ahead if they had decided to actually follow this storyline through and show because Adamski goes running off into the night. And if Amityville three was this demon possessed priests roaming the countryside, I would be all Oh, totally, totally. God. Yeah, it's really well, yeah, it's such an ambiguous ending, a very ambiguous ending to you know, because again, he's, he's supposedly, I mean, you know, Sonny is looking all beatific and not evil when he gets carded into the cop card of answer for his crimes. But there's a damskie sitting in the house, you know, and his arm starts doing the mu head fumbling demon possessed arm thing, and then he's like, Oh, my God, why have you do not abandon me or whatever? And then boom, like you said, it's done. There's, there's no, there's no, like, actual payoff or or like straight up ending? It's great. It's really interesting. Yeah, the effects of Sonny's face at the end are pretty cool. Oh, I know, watching him totally peel his head off. Incredible then and that was like, there was like, Ed French. And I think it's John Scaglione, Jr. These guys were very active, very active practical effects guys in the 80s. And I'm forgetting, I think they might have worked with Tom Berman on the beast within from 1980 to the cockroach man. You know, puberty comes, I become a cockroach movie. And I'm forgetting I'm forgetting if they actually I'm pretty sure that they were on the crew for that. And you can see that style of the usage of because the bladder is very new at the time. Did you happen to talk about kind of Wallace's screenplay early on and kind of what it emphasized more? No. Well, the the key contribution that Tommy Lee Wallace mentions in an interview that I think is on one of the shout factory blu rays, I think it's a truncated version of it is appearing on YouTube. Wallace talks about how he the the element that he really emphasized as they were as he was writing the screenplay, which got gradually, heavily de emphasized as Damn, as Damiani and such Eddie got to working on the screenplay was the Indian burial ground element in the movie, as is right now, it's just mentioned in passing by the Dotty Little Librarian and pulls out the records of the house. But it was apparently a much more prominent element in Tommy Lee Wallace's original screenplay, and I would be really intrigued. I haven't had a look at it. And if there's anybody out there that's listening that has had a look at it and can comment on, you know, any similarities and differences that had to the finished product, I'd be really interested in hearing because, as has been noted, the whole this house slash buildings slash structure has been built on a haunted Indian burial ground thing is, like done to death eight different ways from Sunday now, but back in 1982, when this came out the same year as poltergeist it was still a relatively novel kind of trope to be busting out. Roger Ebert made good points in his review where he said, Why would evil spirits be bothered at the desecration of pagan burial grounds? Thank you. Baby, just possessiveness they're jealous pitches, also said and if that was the case, why would a Catholic priests be needed to exercise? Hard to argue with that one? Because it's directed and shot by Italians, ladies and gentlemen. One of the things we did discuss, but I kind of want to get your thoughts on this, because you had talked about DeFazio in prison and everything. DeFazio later claimed, I don't know if you know that DeFeo died in 2021. No, I did. Yeah, he died March 12 2021. While we were all stuck in our own prisons. But before that he had claimed that it was him and his sister Don, who killed the family. Yeah. And there's some detail about that in a lot of this documentary stuff. And that he then when she killed the younger siblings, he lashed out and killed her. So they were only supposed to be killing their parents, apparently. Yeah, that then he and he, he talks about that very specifically in the jailhouse interview. Okay. He addresses that very directly. And that's basically you paraphrase exactly what he said. Okay. And it's, again, it's another weird little twist that will never really 110% know the answer to, because a lot of forensic evidence that came up strongly suggested that he did not work alone, that there was at least one and maybe even two people helping him different types of firearms were used. Yeah, that's part of it. And but that was obfuscated by the fact that the investigating police when they got shattered bullets and removed them from the various members of the family, they didn't go through the effort of putting them all through the full battery of ballistics. So it is very plausible that they're that the bullets that were removed from the walls and from the corpses that at least some of them are definitely a different type of firearm than the shotgun the shotgun that sunny or sunny. Butch DeFeo is accused of using it's really and there's also the basic like physical reality that DeFazio SR was a 270 pound, stocky, barrel chested Italian guy, and they and basically he was shot outside of the bed and had to be dragged into the bed to make it look consistent with everyone else who was shot to death and laying in the bed. I didn't know that. Absolutely. So he so it would have been and Butch DeFeo himself has like 150 pounds and kind of a lanky kid. They're lanky and tall ish. I think. him actually realistically having drag This 270 pound barrel of a dad across like probably 30 to 50 feet of floor by himself and then schlepping him into a bed and staging it the bed so that it looks like he was laying in there and got shot in the bed is too. So it's a weird detail. And there are also lots of inconsistencies that are brought up in there's a there's a period of time where the whole sequence of police photos and Katzenbach accidentally got access to this, he was asked he requested through FOIA to get all of the paperwork on the DeFazio case. And he suspects that they accidentally sent him a bunch of extra stuff, including a bunch of photos that were on that were part of the entire magazine of film that had been used, taking pictures of the of the site of the actual, you know, corpses of the blood patterns and so forth. And there are key gaps where certain rooms, there are no pictures of no pictures whatsoever. And it is and then like there's I think one picture where out of the corner of the frame, you can see bloodstains, clearly, that are just like outside the border of a room that was not photographed at all. And there just enough inconsistency. So I mean, you know, Bucha failed, basically admits that he fucking shot most of his family to death. But the thing that he has persisted with, despite his inconsistencies that is plausible is that he had help. To what end does doesn't matter that the body be in the bed, his story is that he wasn't home for any of it. So I think I'm not sure. Honestly, I think that part of it was that he wanted to make it look like somebody came in and was very methodical and did it. And, you know, maybe he was thinking that this is such a cold and methodical way to dispatch this family that there would be no, they wouldn't think it was him in some sort of familial you know, crime of rage or something like that. I don't know. I honestly don't know. But it is. I mean, there's a whole I mean, basically, the mob had a hit out on him at one point. Yeah, I know that there's a there's mob ties. It's insane. It's kind of like, it feels it some at some points. It feels like Fargo, you know, shot through, you know, New York, you know, Italian American blue collar sensibility. You know, skipping ahead, I know we've got Amityville Karen and Amityville shark. How come we haven't seen Amityville Godfather that would actually fall into this to hell? Yes. Okay, you guys are filmmakers. Let's get on the stick here. Let's do it. I have enjoyed this so much, Tony. Anything else we can talk about? I you know, I think we pretty much covered all of it. And I you know, I just really, I think I know. What do you think? What do you believe out of all of these stories? I mean, we talked a little bit in the Amityville Horror episode that, that you weren't particularly religious. Yeah. So you're not of the mind? Well, yes, he was possessed by demons. I absolutely am not. And the more the more time goes by, it's like, Hold Sir Hans Holter, the original investigator of the first of Amityville The house that, you know, was sort of inspired or, or inspired or was inspired by the DeFeo case. Here his he makes a very, from what I've heard, I haven't read the book murder of an anime murderer in Amityville. But he makes a very cogent case tries to make a very cogent case for there may be being a supernatural element may be apparent or normal element may be a possession element to the story. But my sense is that he's reaching out. And the bottom line is it really does feel like I mean, the whole story, it's really I would recommend going on YouTube. And if you've got the spare time going through all of this footage that Ryan Katzenberg put together because he he lays things out in exhaustive detail, and it really, the bottom line is it feels like all of this is all this is bullshit, except that there was a really horrific family tragedy that was kind of like the result of the shrapnel of like mob involvement, that, you know, seeped its tendrils, even into the suburbs. That's That's it. That's basically what's going on. Does he get into any of the rumors that DeFazio and his sister did have incestuous relations. There's very, there's a very brief allusion to that. And, and that's another thing that, you know, again, stories like this, it's like a game of telephone, you put it in the hands of filmmakers, and it's like there'll be some sort of I mean, DeFazio in the interview, of course, asserts up and down that this was not the case at all, you know, whether it is or not you, obviously, you can't really trust the horse's mouth in this case. But my inclination is to think that it was something. It was a rumor that was generated either accidentally or intentionally to, like, make a bunch to fail look even worse. Two questions. This is a two part question. Would you? Would you sleep with your sister a, I think I know the answer to this book B. If she looked like Diane Franklin, would you sleep with her? First answer, no. Second one. I'll take the fifth on that. Would you mind if your sister looked like Diane Franklin, if I slept with her? Go ahead. I'm nothing if not a magnanimous guy. Eric, do you have any hard hitting questions for our guests? That I may be able to sort of half answer. Half as answered. Yeah. There you go. Yeah. Diane Franklin. Think just through my whole offense. Talk a little bit about our interview with Dan. Yeah. And I remember when that happened, I didn't see the interview. But I saw you afterwards and you were smitten. I was and I, you know, I grew up like pretty much a lot of us in our age bracket. We grew up seeing her in a lot of like some of the sort of most memorable teen comedies Bill inherited. Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. She's a princess. And she she did the second half dead. Yeah, yeah. And better off dead. She's isn't Monique Juno Juno, you know, she's just adorable. And I she also was very insightful about her career. She had a surprising amount of there was a point where she had gone to Australia and shot this movie that was sort of a It was sort of an Adam and Eve through multiple historic periods in time film that she shot and one of the leads in the movie was an actor named Robert Helpmann. And Robert Helpmann was the second male lead in Powell and Pressburger is 1940 a classic of the red shoes, which is I'm going way highbrow on this but the red shoes is one of the great Hollywood dark fairy tales. I think it is a huge formative influence visually on every fucking Italian genre filmmaker from Mario Bava to Micheli Swaby and beyond a huge influence visually on Tim Burton. And just a pitch perfect bitchy showbiz drama slash dark fairy tale. Basically. The Black Swan Black Swan that Natalie Portman movie is a reasonably decent, grittier Xerox of the red shoes. But she worked with fucking Robert Helpmann, she worked with this guy who worked on one of the most influential movies of all time. She had all these, you know, she she had talked about some of the auditions that she had done. She had a there was a wonderful period of like about 15 or 20 minutes where she went through all these different accents that she had learned. And she was just talking in those accents so elegantly. It turned out also that I was very, she told me this, I was a very first convention interviewer. She had never done an interview at a convention before. And so she was like, thank you so much for being my first it was great. And I was like, I'm honored to be your first shoe. No. Yeah, she was terrific. And I actually, you know, it would be wonderful to I think have her back someday, because we had such a great conversation. And she the fans really loved interacting with her too. She was charming and entertaining and fun. And yeah, I was a little bit a little bit snarky liar. Yeah, well, big surprise. Come on out. Diane. She's our other guests. Miss Franklin. Finally. Famously shitty demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren served as demonology advisors on this film your thoughts on the ones? I you know, don't let my feelings about them color. Oh, you know, I Yeah. And it's, again, this is one of the things you know, there's so much stuff that this Ryan cat Katzenbach nonfiction footage goes into. That's just one of a bazillion tangents that they go into. And it just, it's fascinating. These guys are like almost like the scuzzy grifter, paranormal investigation. Selig's of the 20th century, like, paranormal phenomenon, you know, resurgence they're just they're they're at every case. Always had their noses stuck in it. Always, you know, making sure that their names were We're upfront and coming up with as much insane hyperbole as possible to kind of perpetuate the brand that they've created for themselves. It's a little annoying that The Conjuring movies have sort of turned them into really cool. Oh, girl types, they know, sleazy shits that it is but you know, Hollywood's got to be Hollywood, you know? Yeah, yeah, I agree. I mean, I actually liked those first two conjuring movies quite a bit. And it's because of Patrick Wilson and the reform you go. Yeah, they're terrific, who I think are just fantastic actors. But they have great chemistry together. Yeah, yeah, those are great films, but I can I can definitely separate my feelings of those films and my absolute hatred for the warrants that burns like the fire of 1000 suns. It's it's I'm working on that my friend. Well, all right, like I think people who if that was your introduction to the Warrens, then you go back and look Oh, wow, look at all this cool shit these people did and then you see studs, you see pictures of them, they look like pink, Eastern European toads. For God's sake. It's like, Oh, my heavens above. This is not Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga. And, you know, Ed Warren is not gonna we're gonna put an acoustic guitar on his lap and you know, pluck out an Elvis song, you know, sideburns and all you know, and make starry eyes a juror Farmiga. This is not this is not the real the real world, folks. Yeah. All right. So shall we wrap this up, guys. Sounds good. Tony, what a pleasure to have you back so soon. absolutely delighted that you guys got to have me on so I could blather on and throw out a little bit of extra Blarney about my favorite Amityville. And I can say because we've already recorded it that the next episode is with Vanessa Williams. Our co host was strange aeons. We are talking about Amityville three, the demon dude, I saw it first run 3d at the Parkland theater. When I was like 16, or whatever, I don't want to say it's the last of the watchable films, but we're going to go into straight to video and then even a couple of TV movies and then oh, then it really starts getting bonkers. Looking forward to listening to the to the journey from afar, gentlemen. Well, thanks. And if you are not tired of Eric Myers voice, you can always hear us on strange aeons radio every week. We'll be doing this one. I'm not sure if this drops as a regular episode of Just Amityville. But we'll we'll figure it out. So that's it. Great to see you guys. And we will see everybody else. Probably in a month or so. Thanks for listening ladies and gents, ciao. Had never intended to give it up. Even after we moved out. We intended to find out what was wrong and move back in there. That's why the investigation was held and people from different psychic research groups that at least we could check their credentials were called in and asked to, to comment. We've been asked many times why we stayed so long. It's very hard to remember exactly the exact emotions or the the moment why you would make a decision or why not but you finally did make her by the time we left we had lost a considerable amount of weight. Kathy was passing out quite regularly. I have lost over 26 pounds. And we were just reacting from one happening to another. We weren't really we're generally thinking yes, yeah. As as we normally would presume. You played George in the movie. And you did research this and worked on it and so forth. You smile. Do you believe them? The Amityville Horror procession 3d