Strange Aeons Radio

102 "WHO???"

January 14, 2021 Strange Aeons Radio Season 3 Episode 102
Strange Aeons Radio
102 "WHO???"
Chapters
Strange Aeons Radio
102 "WHO???"
Jan 14, 2021 Season 3 Episode 102
Strange Aeons Radio

102 "WHO???" 
The gang tackles 30 Coins, Relic, and Shadow in the Clouds before revealing their picks for films by directors who have not been discussed on the show before.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/strangeaeonsr)

Show Notes Transcript

102 "WHO???" 
The gang tackles 30 Coins, Relic, and Shadow in the Clouds before revealing their picks for films by directors who have not been discussed on the show before.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/strangeaeonsr)

Unknown:

Oh, I'm sorry, did I break your concentration? Somewhere between science and superstition? To show you

Kelly:

Strange Aeons. Strange Aeons radio. That's Eric over there. That's Vanessa over there.

Vanessa:

Hello.

Kelly:

Hey, you guys. I'm sure that you heard the sad news that Tanya Roberts has died again. No. Yes.

Eric:

twice in two days, right?

Vanessa:

We did for real. Did she die? Yeah. Oh, really? She did actually die.

Kelly:

Oh, like the next day? No. And I kept thinking to myself, was this a pet cemetery situation or what happened? Because her boyfriend was the one who released it to the the agent or whatever. Yeah. And he released it with when I was holding her hand, she took her last breath. I saw our eyes open and all this stuff. And and then, I mean, this guy was super excited to talk about his growth. I finally get into

Eric:

Instagram followers, and I get any new phone.

Kelly:

They're creepy. In other news, oh, I found out something very interesting. I wanted to get your guys's opinion on it. So Warner Brothers, is now agreeing to set up new payment structures for filmmakers, based on HBO max streaming fees. Why? Yeah, so a lot of these people, but you know, Warner Brothers comes out and says, we're releasing our 2021 slate, on HBO. And the people who have worked on those films who had you know, points or something like that, watch that money. Look, it's very unlikely you're going to get any money when you've got points. But on something like Godzilla versus King Kong, which is coming out? Yeah, yeah, there was a good chance for people to make a lot of money on that. But not if it just goes to streaming. Yeah. So Warner Brothers and HBO, Max are making new deals with everybody and saying, look, we'll figure this out based on the streaming and based on the money it makes in the actual theater. And we're cutting down what those levels would have been, so that they're not based on the original deal he made there based on half of those numbers and things like that. And I just thought that was really interesting. And I wanted to kind of get your take on it.

Vanessa:

I wonder if it's like a response to like, the letter from the Daniel balloon

Kelly:

in this news item they bring.

Vanessa:

Because like he he didn't write like us. It wasn't scathing, but it was definitely like, pretty, like you guys need to understand what, how bad this is for us. But I also thought that HBO max may be basically bankrupt. So I'm curious how on earth they're going to be able to deliver on that kind of promise. I don't know. I don't know. This is kind of weird. As a filmmaker. I mean, I, I never expect anything for points anyway.

Unknown:

Well, yeah.

Vanessa:

Especially like, yeah, at this level, like No way. But still.

Eric:

I mean, it seems like the right thing to do. You need to adjust how you do everything. As a film, especially in a studio, where you're, you're a big enough studio that all your a product comes out in theaters, right, which means you're hiring everybody based on in theater money, or based on whatever theatrical deals, because usually they didn't do. They eventually did. But for a long time, they didn't give much anything for VHS to race cars and stuff. That was a big, a big thing. And some of the strikes in the late 90s, I think was when that really started to change. It's good that they're not waiting for. Because work stoppage strikes would be weird right now.

Vanessa:

Yeah, no, I don't know. Like your I think there's something to that what you're saying, which is that we were in the future. And we need to find a system and we need to find something that works and actually helps the people who are going to be affected by it so that artists continue to want to work on projects for next to nothing on the idea of points. Yeah.

Kelly:

So

Vanessa:

yeah, no, I yeah, I fill that void and HBO going, you know what, let's not be the bad guys.

Kelly:

Well, to your point, though, then I wonder if this is just this is just bullshit because they know that you say nothing to say this. Yeah. And make a big deal about it when in the end, it will cost them nothing.

Vanessa:

I definitely think there's a huge part to that because they they from my understanding that They are really bad off currently financially. And that's part of the reason why they did this was to try and get more subscribers because they're banking so hard on that and failing so miserably. So, I think it is really easy to say, Well, whatever you're the new subscriber ships going to be all 15 of Yeah.

Eric:

I'm gonna say, Man, if you are a streaming service and you bankrupt yourself this year, or in 2020, you're definitely figured something really wrong. Unless you had some kind of weird wheel

Vanessa:

before it was. It was before COVID. So I think it was carrying their debt into this situation. So that's my rough understanding. And it didn't at&t by HBO, which is why john oliver makes fun of it all the time. Yes. Yeah. So I don't know. Maybe they're just swimming off of at&t money to survive.

Eric:

It's pretty good money. Some of it depends on his HBO max going, are they YouTube level money where people are making significantly good careers? If you're huge. I mean, you got to have millions of views, but you can make millions of dollars? Or is it going to be like Spotify, where it's like, oh, I had a million listens. And here's your nickel. Yep. I think it's got to be that. So the depends on it's always in the details. Yeah.

Kelly:

Yeah. I just thought it was interesting and worth bringing up.

Vanessa:

Yeah, no. And in case anybody out there doesn't realize when you put your film on the streaming, you're basically saying goodbye to any potential profit. Like with prospect for it took us forever to go on streaming. And the other film that I just finished up even though we're in COVID times they are doing their best not to go straight to streaming because it's basically saying okay, I give up no more money is gonna come in. Like you get nothing like you get viewership, you get people knowing who you are. And it's very exciting to tell your friends and family

Eric:

my movies on No, you can go watch it in your own home. But I yeah, and then send me $1

Unknown:

Please, because they won't

Kelly:

think you saying that then reminded me that part of this news thing was that legendary tried to make a deal with Netflix for Godzilla versus cotton for 225 bucks. And Warner who is co partner on it. They swooped in and said no, no, no. Now they Warner and legendary are making this deal to for it to go right to HBO Max, I guess. So

Vanessa:

I guess HBO Max is probably going to become the place where blockbuster films are coming out. So we'll go there and I guess Disney to see these prod products and then we'll go to Netflix and whatever the other ones are. Amazon Amazon's Hulu. Yeah. To watch the like, smaller, you know, projects.

Eric:

Yeah. And who owns what I mean, Disney technically owns Hulu, because they own ABC.

Kelly:

Right? So I mean, right? Anyway, you guys I watched a really fun stupid movie just recently. It's available as a rental. And it is called shadow in the cloud with Chloe Grace Moretz. And it is World War Two horror about a crew on a b 17 bomber and there is a gremlin on board and Oh, they are trying to fight it out for that. This thing is so stupid. ridiculous how stupid it is. I mean, with every plot twist. I was like, Oh no, I wish I was sitting in a theater to throw popcorn. I loved it. But it was just the stupidest movie I've ever seen.

Vanessa:

So kind of like Snakes on a Plane like you know, you know it's not gonna be good.

Eric:

They added the trailer looked like it might sit closer to a really good be big budget B movie. Yeah, sounds like it didn't even quite hit. No, I

Kelly:

mean, when I say it's stupid, please know that I'm saying it. Oh, you affection. I had such a good time with it. And I really wish I could have seen it in the theater because it is a spectacle. But story wise, it's stupid. One thing you should know written by Max Landis so Oh, okay. I feel like yeah, you want to pirate this movie?

Vanessa:

Yeah, I don't have money. To be honest. I have not enjoyed a single Max Landis joint. Oh, wait, no, I take that back Chronicle.

Eric:

Was that the Seattle film? I still never saw it just because I had enough of the the the people that you're the first person whose opinion I respect but said they liked it. Because most of people said they liked it were people like all right, people. They hated it. Like Kelly. Oh, here's I know, right? I don't care. There's too many other movies to watch. It's

Vanessa:

true. It's true. I think I liked it at the time because it was before. There was a lot of that good looking, low budget CGI stuff. And I felt like the characters were pretty Fun and effective, but I like teen films a lot.

Kelly:

That show had you been hit in the head with a hammer just before you saw

Vanessa:

a no I can't say how sleepy or awake I was. No hammers were involved. No, I mean I but I also love disaster films and I also love spectacle and you know, superhero and all that stuff being mixed together and they're flying around freakin the Space Needle. And I was like,

Eric:

yeah, it's also a found footage style. Which if you don't mind?

Kelly:

Yeah, yeah. Well, I would say that you probably both like shadow in the cloud, but you would also both be going this is so

Vanessa:

maybe I'll put it lower down on the list. Well, I just finished watching Castle Rock season one.

Kelly:

Okay, yeah, to hear your thoughts on it.

Unknown:

Um,

Vanessa:

I am both. I have so many mixed opinions. Eric, have you seen this?

Eric:

I feel free. I'm not. It's not one that's on my list of going to watch it at any point.

Vanessa:

I mean, the entire thing is a mystery. So it's really easy to spoil. But I will just say I hated the decision they made in the last 15 minutes.

Kelly:

Oh, yes.

Vanessa:

How stupid. How stupid.

Eric:

Hold on everyone. And will I be entertained to know what this is? Or is it way too tight? Oh, sorry. Okay. No,

Vanessa:

it's a way to talk about, but I will. But the journey is incredible. Like there's a sissy SpaceX centered episode where you're dealing with somebody who's at at kind of the beginning to middle stages of Alzheimer's and it's from there. Number one, I

Eric:

didn't watch that now because I started to watch and I wasn't not ready for a no like relic and stuff I was fine with but

Vanessa:

yeah,

Eric:

it's a couple years ago that came out right?

Vanessa:

Yeah, yeah. I it's beautiful. And it's just breathtaking. Like that entire episode such there are moments of brilliance in the show. So it makes the ending, like so infuriating. Because you're like, what did you do? Why? Why would you do this? You guys are so fucking stupid. But, but I will say if you ignore that part, and you write your own ending as I did, because I was like, oh, it could have ended these five additional ways that would have been better. I'll just pretend that happens. Yes, but it's it's like American Horror Story. Oh, okay. Like so it's a different story. I got a Castle Rock. Yeah. So the Yeah, it completes that particular journey.

Kelly:

I just thought it was a real wasted opportunity. I don't know what was in the details of the deal they made who they could or couldn't use from kings universe, you know, that kind of stuff. But I thought there was a real opportunity to do something cool. And I would have had that episode seven that you're talking about was maybe the best hour of television ever shot. Yeah. I hated just about everything that came after that.

Vanessa:

Yeah. Yeah. It was confusing. And they did too good of a job bringing us in our direction. They I guess regretted slash didn't want to? I don't know. I'm very frustrated.

Kelly:

And then at the very end, when the thinny between worlds is happening, I would have probably forgiven everything. If I had gotten a glimpse of the Dark Tower or something like, I would have been like, oh, cuz that's where I thought they were going. Oh, they didn't. And I was like, Oh, they do

Vanessa:

make a reference to the Dark Tower at some earlier point, too. So I think they would have been able to, I think they had a ton of opportunities. I honestly, if they had ended the entire show right there. I would have been happier. Just don't give me any ending. I don't care. Just give up. Just walk away, put it down, put down the pen and turn your back and leave the room. I would have been thrilled in comparison to what they decided to do, which is unbelievably frustrating, and just anticlimactic as well.

Eric:

Alright, I'll just keep that off the queue as the I want one that is opening up promising. I hope it doesn't quite go to that ending. But Greg had mentioned this when you had like 30 coins. 30 coins? Yeah. Craig also had mentioned that

Kelly:

and that looks I mean, just overwhelms me. But yeah, I've watched

Eric:

episodes that are out.

Vanessa:

What's the basic idea that

Eric:

religions problems exorcise. Stiles? demons priests. Wait, what

Vanessa:

year? Are we talking? Is

Eric:

it Spanish? I don't know. But It's, it's

Vanessa:

Oh, all right. I feel

Eric:

like he's talking about problems on Twitter or one of the main characters is a mayor. Okay, and the guy who plays the priest is awesome. He's great. Jesus, man, we kind of look back, he was in a rough spot there. I think it was in the episode or God, do not kill this character. God, no. But

Kelly:

there were enough hints, like just a couple of hints in that first episode that I was thinking, I don't think anybody comes out of this alive. Oh, yeah, just as long as there's, you know, there

Eric:

for a little while. Is it feels like a, it feels like a movie or a show that if it keeps going where it is, can be a lot of fun and really entertaining. But man, they could take some really dumb turns, and it could really, really get bad.

Kelly:

It's got a, the main premise is the 30 coins, or the 30 pieces of silver that Judas was paid to betray Christ. And these these people are hunting down each of these coins and of course, it's it almost feels like it's gonna be a little monster the week and that each of these coins has a story that's surrounding it, and the person who has it right now, and bad things are happening. But it also doesn't feel like it's just Christianity or dealing with feels like we're dealing with other crafting things.

Vanessa:

Yeah. Cree,

Unknown:

baby.

Kelly:

Yes,

Vanessa:

I'd add in more.

Eric:

It's it's HBO so sorry, to the people that like everything dumped. It's just you know, once a week comes out on Mondays I think I saw so you know, only two episodes behind at this point.

Vanessa:

Okay, well,

Eric:

although since interest the first episode is a frigging feature length, almost like 72 minutes. Yeah.

Kelly:

Yeah. Yeah, good stuff. Also on HBO. Max. I found a show called warrior that started out on Cinemax.

Vanessa:

I think it is the girl

Kelly:

now with the girl. Well, there's girls in it.

Vanessa:

The Girl with the sword? Is that a different one? Oh,

Kelly:

you're thinking a warrior? None. Yeah, there we go. No, no, this is apparently based on Bruce Lee's original pitch to Hollywood in like 1972 or something. And then they turned around and said nobody wants to see Asians on TV and made kung fu and said with any white actor. But this was his pitch. And it is one of the consultants is his daughter. And it is super stylistic. A lot of problems with the dialogue in that it feels very current for something that's supposed to be taking place in like 1918 or something like that, I think is always nice period. Yeah, yes. It's on HBO. Max. Okay. But it started out on Cinemax. two seasons on HBO Max, and I think there's probably a new season on Cinemax

Vanessa:

is this one that's set in London?

Kelly:

No, it is set in, in America with the Chinese who were, you know, slaves to work on the railroads. Okay. Oh, cool. Okay,

Vanessa:

I've definitely just saw a trailer for this because I was looking at potential shows to forget. But I'm getting to the end. Well,

Kelly:

this. This one is fun. I recommended it to a few people. And both of them got back to me and said, Okay, I'm 10 minutes in and this is my new favorite show. I guess I'm settling in for a marathon.

Eric:

check that one out.

Vanessa:

That's awesome. Very, very cool. Well, Eric, I did actually take up your recommendation. And since eatery talked about it, I watched relic. Oh,

Eric:

and

Vanessa:

I loved her. Yeah, it was it was very, it was not what I expected. Even based off of what you're saying about it. I did not I don't know. I did not envision it went where it went. But it was really really powerful. And extremely good at making complex ideas into visualized like realities.

Eric:

Oh, yeah. Definitely. A good way of putting it

Vanessa:

like without saying anything about weapons, but yeah, no, really, really camp? I don't know. Yeah, I can't recommend it highly enough.

Kelly:

Wow. Well, I gotta check that out now too, I guess.

Vanessa:

You know, I think so. It just jumped up about 20 degrees in here instantly, and hated it. Because I was holding this little hottie in my hand.

Kelly:

Thank you. Get

Vanessa:

the fine gift from Kelly that just keeps on giving. And I thought as soon as I opened this, it's used it. I would it The sun is gonna come out and I was not wrong.

Kelly:

Did you crack it open, though? Is it good?

Vanessa:

Oh, it's more. I know. Now well, it's fine. I my hands will be content and folders. Yeah, just place it right on there. You know,

Kelly:

there's more where those came from.

Vanessa:

That's what I heard. I heard they're kept in a bag somewhere so they just go

Eric:

anyway.

Kelly:

Theater of the mind.

Eric:

Theater started off like a little extra sticky floor theater.

Unknown:

Yeah, so

Vanessa:

there's just no way to like make this not sound bad. Just the name of this product and warmer, hand warmer. Robbie's hand warmer little hand warmers. The website is little hotties warmers, calm.

Kelly:

This show brought to you by little hotties woman calm

Vanessa:

and no odor it says on the packaging. So there you go.

Eric:

Alright. Moving right along. Got another holdover from a 2020. marathon. Yeah. One that, you know, it's not really in consideration. But some people might like, open 24 hours. Have you seen this? This one pretty sure it's on shutter. If it's not shutter, then it's Amazon. Because I remember it's one of those ones that Oh, if you enjoy bread, it's like a 2020 movie. Let's check it out. Boy, it's almost a pretty good movie. It's the story of a, a woman whose serial killer husband has been captured and is in jail. And his one of his big note notorious things is he made her watch several of the murders. And so she also went to jail for a little while and got out and is now hallucinating that she's seeing him still seeing him kill people. Or is she? So she takes a job. Okay, here you're talking to your typical movie. So you're attractive young woman. I need a job. Where are you going to work this fucking terrifying open 24 hours roadside, run down convenient stars. I know. I'm not working there. And she's working the graveyard shift to boot time

Kelly:

to take any job you get these days.

Eric:

And don't mess on the floor.

Vanessa:

Or your target is hiring.

Eric:

I actually would graveyard shift in the middle of nowhere kind of store. As long as you know you had something behind me. This shelf? Probably would be pretty good. Because you know what? You're gonna be just chillin. Yeah, most of the time. Yeah. But so she gets about five minutes of training. And then the guy leaves and the story progresses. From there. It's got pretty well done violence. And the stories good enough, which makes it a little frustrating sort of like the starry eyes and starry eyes from what the woman in the cop shop.

Kelly:

know, last shift or something like that shift.

Eric:

That's right. Yeah, I think I skipped that one confused because those posters are really similar like I, which was pretty good. bordering on what could have been really good. And this is a similar film to this. So it's good. It's well worth watching. Somebody came up and said they loved it. I went okay, cool. And if somebody came up with hate it, I can see that. But it because the acting is good, the effects are good. There's just some really, really stupid decisions that are made. And it suffers a little bit from the head and wants and walkaway moments which just I just think need to be removed from horror films now. You got to figure out a workaround to that where as opposed to Oh, he didn't want to the shovel and I'm going to go scream and cry and walk away as I

Vanessa:

put down the shovel. Yes, exactly. Gently on top of the body and route the dead person's, quote unquote hand around the handle. Just so you know. It's in safekeeping. That's right.

Kelly:

Like in this situation. If this happened to Vanessa, the cops would show up and they'd be like, okay, so you hit him with the shovel and he was down and then you looks like you severed his head with the shovel. Yeah,

Vanessa:

I would absolutely do that. Yeah, cuz like doing it. The number of times you watch somebody literally like, and unfortunately john Carpenter started this crap.

Unknown:

He was like, Oh, yeah, sure enough, he

Eric:

started it. He damn near perfect,

Vanessa:

perfected it and and he has a great quote unquote excusive she just didn't even like what she was doing and just was so appalled that she threw it out of her own hands and she just couldn't handle the violence. Yeah, great. Well, now everybody thinks that's just normal. And when once you have taken the serial killer or monster or whatever down quote, unquote, just go ahead and turn your back immediately toss Whatever happened to be in your hand at the time and just does not one little stroll away. Fine.

Eric:

I think it was one of the few really good parts of screen to where they set that up and fingers. Courtney Cox was just standing there with a gun waiting for the person to come back to life, which immediately shoots them.

Vanessa:

Yes. There you go. Yeah, exactly. Just play with the opposite end. Yes. The opposite end is great.

Kelly:

Speaking of carpenter, I think I told you guys, I don't know if it was off air or on but I was reading a book called taking shape, which was Oh, yeah, yeah, Halloween franchise, an oral history. I picked up taking shape too, which is all of the unproduced Halloween sequels. So holy crap. It's, I mean, it's as big as the first book. And they didn't go through every single one of them. They just, they just went through the ones that actually had a little heat behind them, or had somebody important attached to it before it went away. And it's pretty fascinating stuff.

Vanessa:

Oh, man, I've got to pick that so I picked up the first taking shape probably the same time you did. Because not that not crazy long ago, and it showed up. And I thought it was gonna be like a little book. Book, so I just promptly put it on my shelf and went, I will get to you later.

Kelly:

Well, it's not the making of Halloween. It's the making of the entire franchise. And it goes all the way to the 2018 films.

Eric:

I haven't picked it up yet. But it's sort of like that one. Phantasm book.

Kelly:

It's written by the same guy.

Eric:

Okay. Oh, that's pretty damn good. Yeah.

Kelly:

Dustin McNeely, I believe is that sounds right? Yeah. Anyway, why don't we take a little break? We are coming back and we are talking about I guess it it would be directors we haven't talked about previously.

Eric:

Pretty much. Yeah, it was sort of like we were in a situation where we had to record differently than we normally do. So our time is a little tight. He got wide open.

Kelly:

Which long as you haven't talked about that director before, which was actually a little frustrating because you don't realize how many people we have talked to.

Vanessa:

He was a really tough challenge. I was like, Okay, how obscure Can I get at this point? And or otherwise? I don't think I've talked about Hitchcock maybe, I don't

Kelly:

know. No, no. I basically found myself to directors only made one film. Yeah,

Vanessa:

it was I was I ended up kind of somewhere in there.

Kelly:

Alright, let's take a break and we will be right back.

Unknown:

Drive deep into the Lost World Jurassic Park and experience. Watch out for hidden head butters at the Lost World site the fuel Depot or they will hit your matchbox Humvee breakout to escape. Now to the matchbox like the garage go up the tower. Beware of Raptors who attacked from the ground. But your matchbox vorbei porch wraps won a lost world Jurassic Park plays at two times, I guess vehicles sold separately from matchbox

Kelly:

returned Eric, this was your choice. Why don't you start us off?

Eric:

Okay. really twisted his arm. Yeah, so this was sort of my opportunity to watch some of those seven films that I've seen stuff like, which one do I want to watch? sufferings kind of been up in their game. They're a little less vinegar syndrome now and a little more shopfactory I guess you'd say. But they're still very much like 70s and Italian films and stuff. But this was one from 1973. The name is familiar, but it's not that film called shock treatment. Not The Rocky Horror Picture Show with Richard O'Brien or Batman or Bryan. Bryan did his really rough sequel The Rocky Horror Picture Show. But of course, if you probably thought that you probably know wasn't in 1973 anyway, so there's no rhyme Tomato ratings on this. There's virtually nothing about budget, other than a little bit about its release in France. This was directed by a guy who I've never seen anything from and probably don't. He did a lot of French stuff, but, you know, at he own Joshua seems right. But he did Frankenstein, 90 colors of the devil and the dogs. Well, those are the only ones that kind of recognized. And he did the music with Rene coring on this one. He was also the writer based worked with Roger Kewell, who did an adaptation. But they didn't say what adaptation was I remember reading that no Can I should go look up what this book was and then promptly forgot to do that. So and Enrico Venezia, who has 107 writing credits, I recognize nothing because they're all in Italian or French. All right. It stars ironically named Allie on the law. So it's alliums all over this studio. Day. And he's in day and night. 101 nights. He's actually, as I was researching this, I found out this is at the time it came out a very famous group of French actors. They're very popular, so and any guirado who's in cache, which fairly recent film, I think, I think it was a might have been a Lovecraft Film Festival film.

Kelly:

Oh, that sounds familiar now. Yeah.

Eric:

The piano teacher and the 1995 version of Les Moonves. Yeah, because Les Miz is to the French like Doctor Who is to the UK. Every year, there's a new one. Somebody's got to be in them. And Robert Hirsch, that's a French Italian production with French and Portuguese spoken languages. The basic idea is there's a, if you're aware of the 70s in any way, culturally, the 70s were full of extreme versions of yoga type people and people looking at essential oils and stuff. And they would do this was a very expensive clinic where people went for cleansings of the body.

Kelly:

Sure to get your biorhythm. And

Eric:

exactly, yeah, all that was that was huge in the 70s. I mean, like, people would lock themselves in hotel ballrooms for, like, days and not do bathroom breaks. It was some weird, weird shit went on. I'm sure. That's nothing weird goes on now, but you know what I mean? It appears in a lot of movies. And this looks like a 70s sci fi movie, except of wearing instead of wearing like jumpsuits, they're wearing robes. But everybody's got a uniform and everything's crummy and white. And everything's bright and shiny. opens with a kind of a neat little weird folk song that I'm like, this sucks, but I kind of love it runs through the very long opening credits. And she gets to the clinic and it seems nice everything. They go to the first dinner and she's eating with her friend and he cuts into it. She's like, what the hell is this? Oh, these are seaweed steaks. It's part of the treatment.

Kelly:

Oh,

Eric:

slimy, slimy. So

Kelly:

mine. Well done, please.

Eric:

get crispy. And occasionally, it's kind of fun when you're watching a foreign film and you get some accidentally accidental child humor, where they showed her things she was going to be doing for the day like massage and bath cleaning and the grand douche was just a big shower. But French had some very different

Kelly:

ironically, Eric's nickname in high school was I saw

Unknown:

Oh my god.

Eric:

So on the wrong side of what my nicknames were, but are my make fun of names. Anyways. The shower was a little disconcerting, though because it looked like American prison movies. When they hose people down. sort of look like I'm like, Wow, that is not grand. Pass starts off fairly slowly as the 70s French film is definitely going to do detox center of annoying wealthy people being annoying, wealthy people. She's having some fun in it though, because she's got her. Her gay friend is hanging out with her most of the time and they do a great job of making fun of the people around them and stuff. So it's fun to watch. She has her first treatment, and they don't really show you what the treatment is it just she goes into a room. they inject her with something you're going to go to sleep and then she wakes up the next day. And as researching this film, I found out why this film is actually Way more notorious than it probably would be because it's a decent movie, but it's not great. But because I mentioned earlier, most of these French people were incredibly popular Actress at the time and credibly well known. Like one of the more beautiful men in the world kind of things or something is one of the guys in it, who plays the lead doctor. And so after the treatment, everybody's feeling so great and young and frisky. They go and have a sauna. They're all naked in the sauna. I mean, all all men all the Wim, everybody shaking around. And then for some reason they have a seaweed fight seaweed and start throwing it at each other. And so then they get a little messy. That's like, hey, let's go right into the ocean. So these eight to 10. Almost down the middle, even divided men and women go frolicking into the ocean. And the doctor who's the famous good looking guy shows up on the beach. And All right, I'll join you takes off all his clothes and swings his way into the water. This scene is incredibly long. It feels like it's 10 minutes long. Maybe this is okay, this is weird. didn't think much of a time but then later eating that. That's why the movie was so popular for a while is pick your average Marvel movie, take a whole bunch of those people and put them naked frolicking in the ocean. And that's sort of what this was like, Hello, Chris

Kelly:

Hemsworth

Eric:

for is my God. And then it cuts to cuts away to this scene of I'm not a particularly big fan of lobster. But okay, fine. It's popular. But it's the shot of people. Have you ever cracked open a lobster crab? And there's kind of that off color green stuff. It was a super close up of somebody cracking up a lobster and that sort of all looked like I'm on? Oh, that's that's supposed to be good. What is this? Is this like cutting into the overly bloody steak? Or is this Oh, we're still great rich people having a good meal. I think it's supposed to be the latter by the way. They're so seen goes but man that was like little the movies a lot about battling against aging, the concept of getting older and losing youth, you know. And she gets a warning from the her friend about how you need to be careful with this. It's incredibly addictive, and it can get very dangerous. And he ends up mysteriously dead the next morning after warning her about the treatments like oh, okay, so he's right. And there's a group of workers that work in there is where the Portuguese language comes from is all the workers are purposely brought in to speak a different language, they can't communicate very well. And when it looks like she's going to leave, one of those guys comes up to her and goes Take me with you. I'm not supposed to be here. They, if they see me that they're going to punish me greatly just for talking to you. But if you're leaving, please take me with you. And she doesn't because she doesn't really leave. There's, there's one giant glaring hole in this problem of this film. She tries to leave and they say you can't leave, basically, because you have to pay your bill. But she has full access to her car. And they leave two or three times in the movie to go into the town nearby town and have dinner and drinks and stuff. My

Kelly:

wife was just going

Eric:

through pain. If you think they're gonna kill you, I think you could take it off and send them a check. But after that, she finds out Oh, look, it looks like part of the problem with this film being this 1970 film and it kind of being mysterious as to what the things are giving you might be when the twists come, they're not very twisty because like the first, the first twist is it's the blood of sheep embryos that they're using to inject into you as I go to sleep experiment experiments on animals. Okay, that sounds about right, for late 70s, early 70s. But no to everybody out there who's working, titled if somebody is digging through a bunch of files, and they're obviously reading something on that file, and it's on screen, and I'm guessing that means it's important to subtitle that. Shots of like two or three files on screen for a good 3040 seconds. So you know, you're supposed to see something there. Okay, I'm seeing some words that I recognize, but I'm not getting anything out of this beyond you know, doctor. The sound design is very bizarre at times because when she starts to get into trouble there's a musical use of a kind of like a woman's Or maybe a younger woman's screen. At first is like, why is somebody screaming around her? Then I realized hold on this is kind of flowing with the music. And she's now in a tunnel, underground and cement alone. So I'm guessing the screams are part of the soundtrack.

Kelly:

Like a bad choice in a horror film.

Eric:

Yeah, if you're gonna do it, make sure it's got an abstract. She gets chased by dogs at one point, but it's two Great Danes, right? And they look like they're frolicking. I mean, these are great fishes and I know they're big. The overall ending actually ends up being fairly good when she finally confronts the doctor and there's a confrontation between her and the doctor. What saves the film as these are popular actors, so they're good. The acting in this film is universally very good and subtle wood, which is great because a movie like this can very easily turn into melodramatic, which it does at times, but the acting never gets melodramatic. So you don't feel like you're being manipulated, like you do with overacting groups. So it was and that's what made the film work. It's It's commonly directed since I guess we're supposed to be talking about directors. I don't know. It's my subject. But it's rare. It is very well directed. It's moves at a for a slow 70s sci fi film, it actually moves at a pretty good pace. Things get done well. mysteries aren't brought up and forgotten. And the right people are assholes and the right people are nice. It just it works. It's a good film. But sorry, is good. I was at the time in a grumpy crappy place. Watch this. If I can even talk about this stupid movie then I thought about it while he was gone. All right. Okay, hold on. This was better than I gave it credit for some trivia notes. In the UK, it was released as Doctor in the nude. They didn't even play around. Just like he gets what you're getting in this. That's why you want to watch this one. The lead actress says in her biography that the lead guy actually slapped her very hard. Because apparently she had left her husband who is the lead actress best friend.

Unknown:

Oh,

Vanessa:

bang, like in the scene?

Eric:

Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So watch this and go Damn, no, it was a brutal, because it was a real couple little interesting reviews here. Timeout wrote Joshua, Joshua, how he says handles his mixture of suspense and satire with assurance, drawing fine performances from Godot confused, and finally uncertain of her sanity, which actually she does very well. I like that in movies, when you've got an actor's performing. who's losing their mind? And as you're watching it, you're kind of going well, Am I understanding this at all? And she's very good at that. A neat cautionary table on human vanity comm fable about hypocrisy. And it, it's good. It's not an earth shattering. You know, in 1973, we're doing our urine review, it wouldn't be in my top five, but it would be in my honorable mentions. I think so. 1973 shock treatment.

Vanessa:

All right. Very cool. Well, my particular pick is available on Netflix, and has been for quite some time, so

Eric:

hard to get.

Vanessa:

No one has no foot. Um, so since we're going with directors that we hadn't really talked about before, I had like a list of people I was trying to like, go through and figure out who was interesting to talk about and because I thought most will actually talk about the director. But I'm crazy. So yeah. So I came across this one director and I saw the film that she had done and I was like, man, I I would love to explore her a little bit more. So I picked Karen Kazuma, who directed the 2015 film The invitation as a singer,

Unknown:

so ever, they're overcompensating kind of hard to call everybody up out of the blue. We've got so much to celebrate tonight. She's on a journey, and we feel that it's important to be on that journey with the people you love. Everybody, this is my friend Pruitt. Those suspicious hospitality

Vanessa:

you've been handling things he can be self destructive. I think he's doing the best he can

Unknown:

we don't see you for two years and then all of a sudden we get invited to this lavish dinner. Don't tell me that this is normal.

Eric:

What do you think is happening? Well

Unknown:

disappoint us tonight is the night our faith is made real

Eric:

excellent film.

Vanessa:

It's I already knew I love this film. So and I'm probably have mentioned it in passing, but I've never really done like a deep dive on it. So it was it was fun to check out. So Rotten Tomatoes. kind of surprising. Actually. It was 89% critics, which is not surprising and 69% audience which was really it was a little rough guys.

Eric:

I guess it's an oddly paced film. It is a slow.

Vanessa:

Yeah, it is a bit of a slow burn is low budget. The budget was 1 million. The box office was 354 point. Sorry, 354,835. worldwide. But it was a festival film that pretty much immediately went on to streaming so again, not surprised. I'm starring one of my favorite actors. Not Tom Hardy, aka Logan, Marshall green. This I think was the film that I saw him and that was like, why is Tom Hardy in this movie? forevermore, Logan, Marshall, Marshall green, who I actually enjoy at this point more than Tom Hardy. makes me so happy. And I had talked about him previously. In devil. He's also an awesome film called upgrade. He's in Prometheus for a hot sec. And he did a ton of TV. I didn't realize he was in like the OC 24 bunch of film. I saw a bunch of TV I'd never heard of including traveller, dark blue Corey damnation and shadow play. But he then bounced around for a while. The other stars that are in this that are recognizable because they're it's kind of an ensemble cast. Tammy Blanchard is Eden his ex wife. You might recognize her from maybe like Moneyball or in the woods. She's been in 53 things. But what you should know her for is her lead and Gypsy where she won a Tony. Whoo. So that was kind of the main thing I was like, man she I'm surprised she is I'm more acting credits. Oh, it's because she's like a Broadway singer person. Um, then you get john Carroll Lynch. Who is that creepy guy who's in everything. He plays a creepy guy and this one? unsurprising he's been in 123 things. I'm including in Zodiac he plays Arthur Leigh Allen Fargo, he plays no worm and Big Sky which I just saw my mom watching so I I've picked up random parts of it. He's the evil cop. Also American horror stories Mr. jingles so and I do have to do one special extra mention which is I watched him in channel zero as the kind of creepy dad character and he's freaking awesome. And so anyway, creepy character in that right? He did. He did. I know. It's kind of really against hope for him. But he did a very good job of having this line of work line, the line between being a sweet father and a horrifying killing, non thinking killing object. And then the last recognizable person in this is probably Toby Huss, who plays kind of this really weird part of just being a doctor on a tape that they watch a few times. But he's been 100 149 things, including he's texts in glow, that was kind of the thing that I recognized him from. He started off in Adventures of Pete and Pete, as already, which is weird. He's just been in everything since then I guess. And he's a several voices and venture brothers. So that was kind of cool. And then there's a bunch of people who are unknown. Except for you might might recognize this guy named Jody, this villa Sue. So who plays a guy named Miguel, he's been in like, every soap opera ever. He was in 277 episodes of Young and the Restless 75 episodes of Days of Our Lives, and 139 of all my children. So Way to go, dude. So story and his will, the main character who's played by Logan, Marshall green is invited by invitation to get it to a dinner party, with a bunch of close friends who's being it's being hosted by his ex wife, who no one has seen in two years. When he arrives, he's flooded with the emotions and kind of bad memories of the house he used to live in, because that is where his young son died. So definitely very awkward moment where he's basically entering this home where it's like his best friends, like their best friends as a couple are also thrilled to see him and get back together. And then his weird ass ex wife shows up definitely has not been in a cold or something for several years. So the party basically goes from stranger to stranger, when his ex who's also hosting the party with her new boyfriend, and they live in the couple's old house. So wills, very much a third fifth 20th wheel and this and then several members of their cult show up. The cult is also called the invitation

Unknown:

ception No,

Vanessa:

right how many layers of invitation happen? Um, so basically, as the as the film progresses, you're kind of going in and out of these sort of memories that will has of his son and the the breakup of him and his wife. Things just get weirder and weirder. And because you're seeing it through his perspective, you're kind of balancing this line of is he just not in the right headspace and he's reading everything wrong? Or is it really fucking weird. And most of the time, it feels just really fucking weird one, one of the cult members who's hanging out in the house is this girl who's down the hall, he sees her kind of in the shadows, and she's just standing there with no underwear. Hill hanging out, like Yo, what's up. And then next time he sees her, she's wearing like a very nice, flimsy little dress. And it's like, okay, that's interesting. He sees his wife, his ex wife through a glass door, taking a bunch of pills, and he doesn't know what's going on with that. And then someone who is meant meant to arrive early and left a voicemail for him, it just isn't there. And so he starts to get suspicious about like, Where on earth this guy is. And then on top of it all, the ex wife's new boyfriend is sharing with them all these weird cold things like showing them like a kind of introducing the cold video where someone literally dies on it. And it's very odd. And then it doesn't do all these weird games where it's like, we're not going to play Never have I ever we're going to play the thing I wish for. And it it just everything about it gets cringy and strange and just off putting, but in the meantime, you know, the friends are all they're trying to be supportive of both people and the relationship and they're just so happy to see each other. So they're kind of like, dude, you got to stop reading into this look. Yeah, okay, she's in some weird thing, but this is her way of getting through the loss of your son. So the big question is, is will crazy or something truly fucked up going on? No one believes him. But they do acknowledge how hard it is for him to be there. And I won't. I won't answer that question. Because it really happens pretty close to the end of the film, when you find out whether or not things are bad. But I will say as far as things that are great about this film, that the choices at the end are phenomenal. I do like that the film isn't too long considering it's definitely like a bottle kind of film. You're really in this one space the whole time. Great acting. Oh my god the acting in this like this is a film I feel like we've all seen before. Where there's a dinner party of friends and things weird things happen. It because of the actors And this, it feels so naturalistic. And so kind of real that ever a lot of those tropes are forgiven. And the characters are interesting. You've got like a gay couple, you have cross fingers, the right word, cross, the cross racial, a couple you have like, I mean, they're just like, yeah, these are just people. This is just normal, interesting, cool people that he would, of course, have been friends with. And it just feels very, very good. The relationship between will and the X is extremely well done. Their connection, even though they're both kind of on different sides of align now feels really palatable. And the strangeness that has happened feels real. They don't have like that many sit down convos of, Hey, isn't it strange that our son is dead, and we're here together at this party, but there's enough like looks and glances and moments and like when she greets him at the door, she gives him like a really intimate hug. And he's, he's there with his new girlfriend. And it feels awkward to us. But also like, Oh, these people have a past. And you can see it just in the way that they touch each other. The tension is built up extremely well, the strange things that are happening feel very strange. And they just do a lot with very little. The things that aren't great about it. I guess it can be a little frustrating that no one is listening to him or believes him. The wife is also super for for a fra you know what I mean? She's like, Really? It's like the cold tea like, oh, we're feeling the earth and like, we're all gonna eat this organic food. And yeah, that kind of stuff. That is a little irritating. The coal crap is kind of irritating. It is a slow burn. So you do need patience, and no offense, Kelly, but I think when people are the worst la wine people are the worst of the worst, which is what we're watching. Um, you know, like, my, my interaction with wine culture is very different than your interaction. So watching people who are very proud of themselves for drinking wine, drink wine and talk about how proud of themselves they are about it is very difficult for me to enter.

Kelly:

hurtful.

Vanessa:

It's not about you, okay. Hold you out. No, because I don't want you to feel bad. It's just there's all this baggage. I have like a car full of baggage in my trunk, all related to wine. And so I just want you to know before I get in the car, what's going on here? Because we're talking about this director, and I really was excited to get into her. Karen Cousteau. Kusama, so she originally directed a couple of other films we might recognize girl fight, which is where Michelle Rodriguez comes from a on flux Jennifer's body. And then she did a lot of TV followed by most recently destroyer. She also was one of the producers on leap of faith.

Kelly:

I don't know what that is. What are these words you

Vanessa:

should look into it? I think you dig it's more of that. William?

Kelly:

Wait a second. So you're saying this is Director we've already talked about?

Vanessa:

You have mentioned a film in which she produced produced did not direct did not direct.

Eric:

Remember when you talked about girl fight for about an hour.

Kelly:

I do remember that.

Vanessa:

She also wrote she only wrote one thing ever, which is her segment on xx, the kind of girl and the horror anthology. She did the segment her only living son. So Karen was born in 68. from Brooklyn, New York went to NYU Tisch School, initially worked as an editor on documentaries and did some indie film and music videos. And then was a nanny, and also painted houses. So she had a nice like, worked her way up through the system. When Nanaimo. She met john Sayles who basically she acted as his assistant for three years, and then was with him when he made Lonestar men with guns and limbo. And then she wrote a screenplay in 1992 right around the time she got really into boxing. Yeah, and that's where girl fight came out. It worked out well. Yeah, really, really did. Um, she wrote and directed her first feature at 31 girl fight. And that was partially financed by sales released in 2001. A ton of stuff did well at Sundance did well can actually did break even financially but didn't make a profit. Still, she ended up getting to do an influx. With Charlize Theron, which had a budget of 62 million, it was basically sliced and diced and taken from her and then gross 10 million below budget. So, obviously, she was struggling to get more work. But she did manage to get Jennifer's body written by Diablo Cody, starring megan fox that grossed 31 million million on a budget of 16. So from there Yeah, basically she ended up in TV for a long time after that, basically. Yeah, exactly. Like you said,

Eric:

but I'm curious to kind of revisit that now. It's sort of popping up again is one of those like you guys, take another look at this movies. I remember thinking it was just done. Okay.

Vanessa:

Yeah, but I don't think I saw it. But if I did, I probably don't remember because I think it was one of those dull But okay, slightly, like, supernaturally, but you get a sword. Kind of, I mean, invitation is so well done. It's just hard to eat some. It's definitely interest. Yeah, so 2015 her husband, Phil, hey, and his writing partner partner, Matt men Friday, wrote it. It was funded through kind of a special project called Game Changer films, which is a fund to help women directors, so it was kind of a way for her to have a second chance. So this film premiered in 2015 at South by and then it was released by Drafthouse, and it actually it wants some pretty good stuff. They got the Critics Award at noctel International Film Fest and busts of switches, and the golden octopus at strausberg euro Fantastic Film Fest. So the inspiration for the invitation came from her own personal experiences. She had actually lost her brother when she was really young. But I didn't see anything about her joining a cult. So yeah, it was shot in sequence and cost 1 million. Yeah, I know. That's why I thought I was like that's kind of cool. shot over 20 days in LA, and she got full creative control. That was kind of the the big thing for her. At that point. Actually, when destroyer came up, Nicole Kidman actually lobbied for the part after reading the script. She was so excited to jump on that film. So at this point, this character demands Final Cut or she will not work on the film that is kind of her new stance. She's noted as having strong feminist themes, and almost all of her films have a female protagonist except for the invitations. Right? And she likes flawed and ambiguous characters. She also just a couple of fun quotes from her to wrap this up. She said, I revisit Roman Polanski's Rosemary's Baby, at least every year, that film is endlessly watchable, funny, scary, and a sly feminist fable about the pitfalls of patriarchy. And she said, I think Toby Hooper's the Texas Chainsaw Massacre is one of the greatest art films of all time. So she's definitely a fan of the genre. And I'm hoping that, you know, we see more of her in the future.

Kelly:

Well, all right, I think Vanessa took up all my time too, so that's the Oh my God, I'm

Vanessa:

sorry. I I felt it as I was doing it, too. I tried to be so short in the front half and then I just I did too much research. I'm

Kelly:

sorry guys. Just gonna open some wine here. Too much.

Unknown:

Wine and a kid's party.

Eric:

Oh my God. That is wine. That is why

Vanessa:

it's definitely wine guys.

Eric:

I'm sure they're nice bubbles in that way.

Kelly:

Alright, guys, well, let me just say this. I chose poorly.

Eric:

How did you Oh no.

Kelly:

I chose from 1991 or 1989 depending on who you're asking. Okay, popcorn.

Unknown:

Before the horror of Halloween before the feet of Friday the 13th before there was something happening.

Vanessa:

Someone shakes her hand she's running

Unknown:

Buy a bag in a box

Kelly:

Oh, okay. I couldn't find those budget. The box offices was 4 million ish. Rotten Tomatoes critics have it at 37% the audience has it at 41% it was directed by Mark Harrier who nothing really to speak of, since this except that he is an actor and he has been in Porky's, Porky's revenge, Freddy's nightmares, a ton of other things, but most recently a recurring role on the Bosch TV series is on Amazon crypto. It was written by Alan Ormsby, who will my bodyguard, the cat people remake and all of the substitute movies and says Jill Shaolin was the daughter in the stepfather. She was also in purse too, and when a stranger calls back, Tom Dillard who was in parasite Greece two and one crazy summer, and D. Wallace, who is pretty much genre royalty 253 credits, including the howling, et Cujo and critters. I thought this movie was something else when I picked it. Okay. And if if one of the listeners can help me out, that sounds like something Joe, Sherlock with no, I was looking for a film where a film festival happens if I remember correctly. And then, like some kind of monster comes out of the films and attacks all the people watching the films and this would have been a late 80s early 90s film, I think that's what happened. I thought that's what this was. I mean, not demons. Not Deena.

Vanessa:

Yeah.

Kelly:

This one starts off with this a nightmare sequence and our lead wakes up and she tells her mom, that she's having these nightmares about this man who's trying to kill her and all this. She is a indie film student at a little college and she's preparing a script, the film teacher, he is going to allow the kids they've worked out this deal with this old theater called the dreamland that had been destroyed by fire early before. And they are going to show their films The student films there. So they're putting on like a little Film Festival in their own film. But while they're preparing all this, the theater and everything they find this film in there called position, which is about a guy named lanyard gates, who was a kind of like a, he was insane, maybe a little bit of a mad scientist, although they never come back to that. He just seems more like a like a culty kind of guy. And he recorded this film, which is his attempt to sacrifice this person. And they're going to they see this and they're like, Oh my God, we got to make this part of the festival. It's amazing. From there, a lot of shit happens that I didn't quite get there's a real nightmare dream logic to this that I I was like, is this a movie? I thought it was or isn't it because there are scenes that felt like, I'm probably you know, mashing two films together or something or trying to find this. What there's this this crazy mosquito monster up in the rafters that is part of the film festival thing that they're going to be using kind of like in a castle, castle wooden castle town think the film teacher is killed by this mosquito thing, you know, stabs through him. But then the next. The next thing we see is that guy, the teacher who goes and kills one of the students. And then the next thing we see is that student who goes and kills a different student in your you're sitting what is actually going on here. And it turns out that one of the students is actually the guy who made the film and died in the fire earlier, with amazing Hollywood effects masks on him to cover his burned skin. And so that as he's killing these people, he's making these prosthetics that he can then were to kill the next person. Wow,

Eric:

he is the greatest makeup artist ever.

Kelly:

Yes. This is really really stupid. I was so unhappy.

Vanessa:

Is this vinegar syndrome?

Kelly:

Well, it's I don't know, but it's on Amazon. Oh, okay.

Vanessa:

Yeah, I think I looked at buying this and they're big sale and I came very close. So

Eric:

now I'm visually as far as poster wise, I always get this confused with Fade to black. Oh, no,

Vanessa:

that's what I'm doing. Fade to black.

Kelly:

Fade to Black is a good thing. Moving on. Okay, gotcha. Good, but not. So then they show the movie possession, which was his attempt to sacrifice somebody and now he's got the main girl Maggie. And he's going to sacrifice her like, simulcasts with this film that he's brought alive. And I mean, I'll, I'll, I will spoil this because it's shit with a big huge mosquito thing comes off the rafters and plummets and kills him. And, and the audience goes crazy because they think they've just watched this great live action thing while this film was playing behind it. None of them realized that this was what it was.

Eric:

You know, I had a similar you guys know, this week was kind of a mess. If had been an average week, I might have taken the film I watched and done and done a different one as well. I mean, I like definitely more than you like yours. But after I was done, it's like, I should have done the hitcher.

Kelly:

Oh, well, that's just it. I we were on kind of a crunch. Yeah. And I was like okay. Anyway, um, there is a little bit of trivia here that's kind of interesting, in that this this was obviously a troubled production, and nobody was really happy with it. Such a box office disappointment in the US that in many markets, and I don't even know if people remember that there used to be these kind of theaters. It bypassed first run theaters, I went right to the second run theaters. And there were these little dollar theaters, you can see a movie that had come out six months earlier than it finally made it to the dollar cinema. Well, this one would premiere at Dollar cinemas. That's how I was doing. The title popcorn was linked to an element in the story. But this element was removed. Beautiful, the producers and distributor like the title. So it was Kevin Kevin. Wow. No popcorn movie.

Eric:

He can shoehorn that in, I guess.

Kelly:

Yeah. And finally, while the film flopped in cinemas, it has since become a classic among horror fans. I mean, I will. I'd like to meet those horror fans. Largely due to its homage to William castle, who is known for creating theater gags, such as the ones depicted in popcorn.

Eric:

Just watch a matinee instead. If you want to reminisce about what the castle

Kelly:

Yeah, this is one of those movies it was shot in Jamaica and weird. Well, you know, most movies are shot in different locations, depending on who will give them a tax break or, you know, whatever. And, and then they dress these sets up we see all the time horror films are being shot somewhere in Romania is really right now. And so you have to then kind of throw American license plates on the cars that are parked on streets and try to hide the fact that their street signs look way different than ours. This one suffers from that because you're watching stuff. And I'm not exactly sure where it's supposed to take place. But then, just in a real quick scene, there's like a big palm tree. And you know what? The fuck is this? I thought this was supposed to be Chicago, and I suppose there are probably palm trees somewhere. But you wouldn't make it a point of showing it if you wanted people to think you're in Chicago. So, yeah, that's my movie. I didn't love it. But I'm certainly glad that I got to listen to Vanessa talk about her movie.

Vanessa:

You know what? I just research and I wanted to

Eric:

the impressive part about the invitation though about you're talking about it was that's a hard movie to talk about. Without

Unknown:

Yes.

Eric:

Yeah. Not a lot really happens per se. It's not like a plot movie.

Vanessa:

No. There's a lot of like, looks and glances and emotions and then the things happen that happen again.

Kelly:

And well. And yet you still managed to to really long run an insult to me. Because I drink wine.

Vanessa:

I count that as a success frankly.

Eric:

Bonus. Well Vanessa wins.

Unknown:

Oh, God.

Kelly:

I don't want to win. I drink wine because I'm an alcoholic. That makes because I'm a snob that actually makes me feel much better.

Vanessa:

It's a different thing in the UK. Okay, that's all I'm gonna say people who like women who drink wine in the UK. It's a different thing.

Kelly:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I guess.

Unknown:

I mean,

Eric:

I'm just going to have my keep you in this hole for like,

Vanessa:

I just I don't know what it's like over here because I don't drink wine over here.

Kelly:

Obviously, people are wine from Why can't I think of his name. He played Snape in the Harry Potter movies and um, he was in a movie that we saw at Sif and he played the snobby British Oh wine guy and he was trying to explain to the the California winemaker, it's like, You think I'm, you think I'm a snob because I'm British, but I'm not. You think I'm a snob because I drink wine or something? He's like, I'm not I'm just British. I'm trying to everybody's Yeah, everybody's yelling at us right now. Because we can all see him he was he was the hero and, truly, madly, deeply. He's

Vanessa:

actually one of the people. Because I always want to say Rowan Atkinson, which is not true.

Eric:

Spoon because it would hope more.

Kelly:

Alright, guys, I think I've got the next choice, and I'm going to make it work. Wait a second. Do I have an extra?

Vanessa:

No. For you stealing it from?

Eric:

You cannot make it work.

Vanessa:

Okay, well

Kelly:

tell. Let

Vanessa:

me let me tell you what we're gonna do next week since you don't know. Um, we're gonna do me, myself and I where you can explore the multi faceted version of a singular person. So maybe they have split personalities. Maybe they have broken multiple

Unknown:

people.

Vanessa:

Yeah, there we go. Alan Rickman, thank you for doing that. Because otherwise everyone would have murdered so they

Kelly:

probably already have edit all that out and just

Vanessa:

tune out. Just put that word in and then have me continue talking be great. But yes, so you can you can go about this a lot of ways you can do like a Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde. You can all kinds of ways you could even do possessor like two people fighting for one consciousness. But yeah, so it's a wide open plane.

Kelly:

This is actually a great topic. And it's weird that it took us this long to get to it.

Vanessa:

I'm also surprised it was available as a topic to choose. So yay,

Eric:

well done.

Kelly:

All right. Well, thanks to everybody. for the kind words as usual, we're coming into 2021 hot, as evidenced by Vanessa's mean spirited.

Vanessa:

I'm feeling like see.

Kelly:

We appreciate all of you so much. I appreciate the two of you coming up here, as usual, want to be a lot more than the other? And we'll be talking about me, myself and I What are you by? Our show is recorded somewhere high above Naval Station Everett at the nexus of all realities, and is engineered and produced by Eric Margaret. Our theme music is Strange Aeons part one by the band Nightshade is used with permission. Fine, Strange Aeons radio on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, wherever find podcasts