Strange Aeons Radio

130 DOCUMENTAL!

July 29, 2021 Strange Aeons Radio Season 3 Episode 130
Strange Aeons Radio
130 DOCUMENTAL!
Chapters
Strange Aeons Radio
130 DOCUMENTAL!
Jul 29, 2021 Season 3 Episode 130
Strange Aeons Radio

130 DOCUMENTAL!

Our first show in the new studio, and we're not sure exactly how to handle the lack of seagulls. Also discussed: Gunpowder Milkshake, Blood Red Sky, the Fear Street trilogy.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/strangeaeonsr)

Show Notes Transcript

130 DOCUMENTAL!

Our first show in the new studio, and we're not sure exactly how to handle the lack of seagulls. Also discussed: Gunpowder Milkshake, Blood Red Sky, the Fear Street trilogy.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/strangeaeonsr)

Unknown:

Oh, sorry, did I break your concentration? Somewhere between science and superstition? To show you Strange Aeons. Welcome to Strange Aeons radio. That's Eric Margaret over there. Whoa, hello. Vanessa Williams over there. Hi. You guys, we are celebrating the very first episode in the new Strange Aeons studio and what do you think? I it's terrifying. It's okay, there's no seagulls standing by the seagulls visually, not as arresting to be sitting here but it's boy, it's, it feels like okay, we're here to do a podcast now. It's been 72 degrees outside and a cool 64 in here and I almost texted you. Why should I wear? Ever I was like, What's this? What's the temperature now? What do I expect? Like normally I come in with a tank top and a sweater. Right? Like, just go through both of them in one sit Exactly. But no longer we no longer have the gigantic magnifying glasses that are pointing at us while we're recording. So you'll have to worry about the board getting insanely hot as it sits in the sun. Yeah, so. So we are sipping our westwards stout cask single malt. Thank you very much again, Bob, celebrating the show with that today. And I am completely moved out of the old place now. Yesterday was deep cleaning. And it was a 14 hour day that included a trip to the dump and goodwill. But I'm done. Did you hand in your keys? And no, I haven't done that. Because I paid for the month there. And I also paid for my garbage there. So I'm dumping all my garbage over there. So fill up all the bins here and make everybody angry with with my recycled boxes. That's awesome. I mean, it must feel so strange to be in a new place. It is it is kind of weird. I'm warming up to it though. It's, it's so much easier to sleep at night when it's not 900 degrees in the bedroom. Oh, sorry. And you don't have neighbors like having domestic situations. I ran into the neighbors because of course they're moving as well. Not their choice. But you'll recall, there was a little bit of domestic abuse. And I ran into the girl. And I was just, you know, we were talking and everything and I was just really studying her, probably in a very creepy way. First of all, she's very, very pretty. She's like, ridiculously pretty. She's also very, very tiny. And so I'm just looking at her going. How does how does this relate to the the story I heard of her beating up her bodybuilder looking boyfriend. And then also, she was probably weirded out because I kept staring at her teeth and I'm like, Where's the method? How can you get such good teeth if you're a math? dressing the plot thickens. Yeah, I don't know. But uh, but I said my goodbyes to them. Bye. Bye. See ya. Hope you can stay at your next place for more than three months. They told me they were moving to Bellevue and for our listeners who are not in the area Bellevue is kind of hoity toity, and very expensive rent, so I'm wondering how they're gonna manage that. That is a weird idea. Imagine it's probably just as easy to squat and not pay 20 $800 a month place as it is and a 13 $100 a month. That's so true. That's true. Good. Good. Future note. If you're gonna squat, just go go high. Why not? That's right. You're gonna skip your car payments. You might as well be buying a Cadillac. Don't do it on you. So as you might suspect, I did not have a ton of time to watch movies and stuff, but I have seen a few cool ones this week. Maybe you have as well. gunpowder milkshake. Oh my god. I did see that. What did you think I hated it. I loved it. No one is surprised. I thought I'd had a shaky opening 10 minutes and I was about to turn it off. And then it suddenly got better. I thought very, very cool. Very girl power and I know that you don't like women very much. So that that's exactly what was. You know, I can't I was just like, when are the guys gonna show up Jesus for tired of watching movies? Yeah. When women constantly Oh, well, it's streaming on Netflix. And if you care at all, let Vanessa thanks then don't watch it. I yeah, I would give it a solid one out of five. But for me, like I just felt stylistically like it was reaching and not succeeding for other great artists. So that was frustrating to me. I was like, why are we looking at Wes Anderson? Why are we being turned to you know, why are we doing this or that? And I wasn't a fan of the writing. But all the actors in it were amazing. And it did look gorgeous it and boy, it was maybe all style over substance is very, very basic. But Eric, you did not know. It's pretty much on Netflix. And it's a it's a female john wick. I mean, to the point where they're, you know, instead of a hotel, there is a library? Yes. Okay with this similar idea. similar idea. Yeah, like you, you pay for like, and everywhere they go. There's some sort of internal currency system where they've got to, like, leave their guns at the door. It seems like everybody's part of the same system. I mean, if I was the writer of john wick, who also wrote nobody, I would kind of be like, Oh, I guess. imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Very, very flattered. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. And Karen, what's your last name? gillean. Yeah, something like that. From guardians of galaxies. Always really fun to watch. Like, I love seeing her career. Blossom past Doctor Who? Yeah. So I got to see something that was kind of an interesting take on something that's existed in the ethos for a long time, and maybe you both checked it out. But I saw the first couple episodes of he-man on Netflix. I have not seen that. I haven't either art by the same people who did Castlevania. And it's really interesting. It's written by Kevin Smith. Right? Which favorite? You would just be like, Oh, my God, I have to watch this right now. Everybody just pause the recording. And it's really, it's interesting because it has these sort of darker tones and these really intense anime moments where the movement and the violence are much more I don't want to say graphic but physical, like everything feels more physical, like the punches feel harder, and the the movements feel scarier, and everything about that works really nicely, but then they still have a lot of the kid tone to it, which I did not expect. So I was like, Oh, you're still doing the goofy like Scaredy lion. Winner dumb magic from the guy like he keeps messing up the magic is the dude with the hat, or whatever the arco is that he's in this Yeah, absolutely. Every everybody's in it. Everybody's in it constantly. I'm like, I didn't want him in. So I'm like, I guess you're another main character that everyone's excited about, because they had an action figure of you. But as it's going on, it is becoming a deeper, better story. And it is also surprisingly, a girl power story. No, I have heard a lot of complaining online. Yeah, sure. I mean, because it through I don't even want to spoil it. But through a series of circumstances, you were following females? At least, for the first three episodes? Or no, no. Tila? Yeah. Yeah. Tila and a couple of other females that through circumstances have to work together even though they don't want to do my statement there indicates how much I watched him and I am noticing a distinct lack of passionate responses to my head Bumbles. I had some of the action figures when I was a kid, but I did not ever remember watching the show much at all. It was also really on the cusp of us being too old for toys. Yeah, ironically. weird to think about. But there was a point where it was just like, Hey, you know, I'm on 13 or 12 or something. And it's like, trying to put away the toys, I guess. Yeah. I think you guys would dig it. Actually, I think that there's a lot to hang your hat on. And as the story goes, it does really become pretty interesting. I think it's only five episodes, five or six episodes. What was that? A motorcycle. That was like, you could feel it could have been a jet actually, that were on the same level as child like now it's true. Yeah. Well, speaking of getting them moving in, Vanessa, you completely missed the Fitzcarraldo. Like, oh my god. Oh my god, I love my couch so it went smoothly. without a hitch, I am shocked. How did you? So you took the window out? And then you wrapped a rope around your couch? And how did that tie the rope to the truck? And then we just said go. Yeah, how did it come over with. So you see in the pictures, and you can see this on our Instagram page, and I think it's on the Facebook page. Also, you can see the moving of the couch, because I was on a third story. Or I was on third floor with the three story building. And the rope that you see is actually just the pilot rope. So we toss that down to a guy on the ground. And his whole point while we were lowering it with two other ropes was to pull the couch away from the building. Oh, cuz it looks so slack. And I was like what? Because the couch has not gone over the edge yet. So and Eric was taking some pictures and everything. He didn't get the the thing midway because he felt like maybe he should be making sure that nothing happened to the couch. And I do appreciate that we did have you know, one not so beyond even as a one other person that showed up half an hour late right after we were done on that one extra person would have been exactly what we needed to get a really good bit. That's true. But the thing is it from getting the couch to the edge of the roof to down to the ground was one minute maybe it was really, there was a friend took a while. Yeah, steel hole. It's helped me lower it down from the top. I love Steve so much. He's like, what do you want me to do? I said, Well, Steve, are you strong? And he says, Well, that's not for me to decide. That's like asking if I'm handsome. You have to figure that. Like, all right, I need you to be strong. You're gonna be strong today. And Rick was here to and Rick Tillman. Yeah, and. And yeah, just went off beautifully. Oh, man. I'm so bummed I missed this. I was unfortunately spending four or five days helping my mom move literally everything that sat on her carpet, in any of the rooms off of the carpet in any other rooms. So that was the joy of the cleaning. Oh, carpet replacement. Oh, entire things getting ripped out. So every book she owns every she clicks dolls every doll she I mean, hundreds, maybe 1000s of dolls. Wow. Got one just just like me. They're action figures. Vanessa? Yes. And these are I guess they are dolls. But they're nice dolls. They're Robert Tanner's and their other fancy names. I don't know much this actually explains your fear of dolls. Now I was Yes. The big thing. No. And my mom makes them too. So there's Yeah, there's quite a few. She's really good at it. I just hate dolls. So they're a little creepy eyes and they're weird expressions. And they're, they're all kids. I don't want little baby kids looking at me all the time. Oh, now we're gonna need a couple photos of these. I was still making dolls. A creepy Daum mascot for Strange Aeons. Welcome. I know mom's listening. So anyway, that bug in your ear. Oh my gosh, yeah, she. It's funny because I did film a short film a couple years ago in the cabin. And some friends of mine came over to give me a hand and they were really freaked out. Every room. We went in there, like, there's a lot of dolls in here. And they're all looking at me. Did these stalls come alive at night? I thought so as a kid. I was very sure. Have you been to I don't know if it's still there. There used to be a doll museum and in Bellevue place we mentioned earlier at a an actual doll museum. It's i don't think i have i've been to many doll shows. I've been to the doll. Places of selling things. I don't think I've been to very many dollar museums. Because I've been fighting this world. Like there's a reason I was playing with Ninja Turtles and not Barbies. There is reason while we're still a little off topic here of talking about movies. Did you know he made an appearance on another podcast without actually being there? No idea what Gord from the bone bat? podcast episode 196 had a bad in his face. Oh, no. Steve was gone. Well, you know, you know what you need to do. I mean, I know what you need to do. Because I listened to the radio, for she had the same thing. But he he isn't going forward with getting the shot. So focus, so he was conscious and it was flying at him. It sounded like it was like on his face. Oh, my God has rights. Very good. He doesn't have to get to do it. But it is a very bad way to die having read up extensively on it. And once you start getting symptoms you're over. So as soon as you start to notice things are not Oh, Hey, it's too late. So I will say if you're gonna get those rabies shots fucking do it, bro. Like, I don't know, I don't know you but I care enough to tell you. It's funny. I actually got a text message the other day from a friend of mine and it was two photos and one of which was a medical bracelet and one of which was paperwork about rabies and he's like, guess who also ran into a bed and woke up to it dive bombing them in a rental. It's an epidemic. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. gored. Haven't you seen the end? Old Yeller or To Kill a Mockingbird? This is not endwell when you have rabies? No, no, we're trying to eradicate it from this country. Do your part. Get the shot. Get the vaccine. Okay. It's a jab Gore. Oh, I'm so sorry to hear that though. But I'm so flattered that I was able to bring a little bit of advice that might be ignored into the world fun and educational fact like so good. Yeah, we have at least one episode that that's that. Okay, so I'll bring up the one I figured, you know, somebody will talk about anyway, fear Street. 1666. And we all watch that one now. Well, I started I'd love to hear I have some fear street thoughts. Oh, okay. Um, yeah, I thought, Yeah, I thought it was. I like the first one the most. The second one was fine. And this one sort of sits in the middle for me. It starts off kind of interesting, if not disturbingly predictable, and then turns into a very violent version of a stranger things at the end. There's just something about the way it's shot and the way things are pulled out in an 80s Mall. Yeah, but can't on Netflix that almost can't look anything but like, it's from Stranger Things, is the same Stranger Things mall is the first episode. I was like, I think that's the mall. Probably. So 1666 goes back to the present. Yeah, it's only about half of the movie. thank Christ, because I thought that was the shittiest stuff I had ever seen. I cannot sit through this awful attempt at period filmmaking. There's a bunch of young hip, people pretending to act like they didn't live in the 1600s I get into those rooms, and they're late night. The whole thing. I mean, I understand that we now we do the opposite of whitewashing. Now, we put people of all races and everything in the middle of early American in 1600s. America and act like they would have been just fine getting along together when that was not the case. But I get the we do that now to kind of rewrite history. But just the language seemed anachronistic. You know, everybody looked like they'd had a shower that morning. and stuff like that really bothers me in this kind of thing, you know. And all the kids disappearing in the middle of the night and none of the parents giving a shit are doing I'm not noticing a place where there's no like traffic radios did seem to tell you that three times the number of kids slash teens that should be in a village the smallest they were showing. Yeah, it had a lot of there was there was definitely problems. I didn't mind having people who looked inappropriate for the time because they did that whole thing at the beginning where it's like, she looks in the mirror and she's actually a white girl with red hair. And I was like, Okay, I do miss this. Yeah, I saw that. Okay. Yeah, I kind of was like, okay, they're gonna use the actors that were already familiar with and play it, put them in here. I don't know why. That's what bothered me. Yeah, there was no reason for it. I was missing that sweet 1666 tonnage though. 1666 that was the biggest letdown. I was like, come on, hit me with it, guys. I will take it I will take your things on me. Like coltie chanting god gorean chance. So we're top of the charts back. There has to be or even just, you know, like little fun songs people would sing while they're tending the fields. Well, so as much as I didn't like it and didn't finish it because I didn't realize it was going to go back to the present. I did finish 1978 and I ended up loving it probably more than both of you. I think I like this My favorite out of the two that I saw all of Yeah, maybe one or two parts is the way to make it work better. Once you got into the stuff that you didn't like about it, the witchy stuff, I started being more interested in that big throbbing heart of Yeah, I lo I was like, Oh, this is exactly what I love about shit. Like I think I think you should finish 1666 because there is a turn in it that I found really fun. And it left the rest of it feeling like purposeful, and I felt like more completed. And it gave me an intrigue to what I'd seen before and to kind of how it was ending that I really dug Wasn't the the witch thing I didn't like I actually liked it. I just wish they didn't try to be a witch movie and a slasher film from the 80s at the same time, and it just once it turned to the witch thing, I wish they would have just leaned in and gone all out into the witch stuff. And turned what the slasher scenes into something that fit that a little bit more. It just seemed disken jointed but now I've thought that was what it should have been. Yeah, they couldn't hold it. You're totally right. They could have pulled the slasher almost entirely and just done some weird which thing happening during summer camp and that would have been pretty fun or even at a turn like they do in the 1666 where it starts off for the first half is a pure slasher movie. And then oh, we discover the witch stuff. When we're done with trying to camp thing. Yeah. And make it rich. But yeah, I thought that part is really good. I hear your complaints. And I agree with me. I think it was the best of the three. It's been so long now and watching the full last one really does change your perspective of everything else. So I'm like, I don't even they're all mushing together now. It's all becoming one very long film. Yeah, well, I also like it to go Yes. Oh, I'm sorry. Did I skip you? Jeez. Jeez, I'm so sorry. Because you were talking so much. I just assumed it was your pig. I wish I was joking. dropping some truth bombs. I can take it. But I did see something that I wonder if you guys saw just came out, like last night or something. Blood Red Sky? No, what is this? This is brand new on Netflix. It is a German vampire movie. It's about a woman who is taking her son on a flight. And she has timed everything. She's going to get some kind of special medical treatment in the United States. And she has timed everything that the entire time they are in the air. It is nighttime, because of the way the time changes and all this. But it just so happens there are hijackers on the plane. And they are going to you know, kill everybody on board and she vamps out and starts taking care of business. I have seen the trailer for this and it looked incredible issue like an old school vampire. Like a Nosferatu looking, she doesn't get that way. But the the type of vampire she is is definitely not like old school rules. Sure. So Wow. I will say this as a trigger warning for some people, some violence to animals. So there's that. I really I really, really enjoyed it. It's got kind of that act to problem where I mean, the movie is long, right? And the middle class question. A lot of just kind of not much happening. Yeah. Did you feel like the other characters were compelling and interesting? Or was it just like, Man, you guys are just sitting on your plot because you're not really sure how to get through it? Well, I actually love the other characters because one of the main ones is who's the big, burly guy from prison break who was also in the flash and oh, I don't even mean ever Dominic Purcell or something like that. He's one of the main baddies. Yeah, and I thought that it was pretty interesting. So is it an English language German production? Or is it goes back and forth with some stuff. I think that you can get it dubbed or subtitled. So I think I was watching it. subtitled, but then I noticed that a lot of the actors were speaking English and they were still subtitling the English and I was like, Oh, this is English now. Can you just take it off? That's so weird when that happens because you continue to read and yeah, hold on. Anyway, I'll shut up. Vanessa. It wasn't meant to be an insult. I really was just confused as to whose turn it was. Um, so have either of you guys seen another kind of recent film? This one from Amazon? Tomorrow war with Chris Pratt. Oh, I've heard Yeah, he thinks about I have as well. I'd love to hear your thoughts. It's fucking amazing. Wow. That is not what I I did not think that would be what I thought either. Hold on. Take a step back. Because that is the only positive thing ever heard anyone say about this? So I'm curious. Is it because it's a very strong disaster movie and it hits you in that place? Yes. Okay, so it is a strong good disaster movie. It's got time shit that probably doesn't make sense but is super fucking fun and the monsters in it are incredible looking. Like I think what they did because I was trying to work it out at the time because they look fucking visceral and they make the monsters from quiet place look like puppies. Yeah, I think what they did is they molded like they actually physically created the first one and then digitized it and used it as a map for the rest because they feel really good. It's just it's dumb. I know it's dumb, but I don't think it's bad. Like I think it's actually pretty consistent like story across the board. I didn't I wasn't frustrated. I wasn't bored. I didn't. I wasn't angry at like potholes. Although I'm sure that there. Like I said, there's time travel. And there's science fiction and there's the world I'm sure there are like weird, bloody annoying things. But the premises people from the future that is being overrun by these aliens come back to now and are bringing people as fodder like basically as Yeah, exactly like fight the war. Kind of like how Russians were throwing people during World War Two just literally needing bodies to push forward. So yes, a gate opens during like a big NFL Super Bowl or some shit. Like, some people watch it. Some people walk out. And they're like, yeah, okay, so in X amount of time from now, I think it's not very far in the future. It's like 50 years or less, the world is going to end, we have these creatures that have emerged. We don't know how they got here. But they're these aliens are taking over. And we need your help now. Because otherwise we are going to all die. So they start recruiting people. And it's not just like soldiers, it's fucking anybody. So you get like little grandmas and you get, you know, moms and you get people clearly that you're following actually a science teacher, which is fine. He wasn't recruited initially. And he's also but he's also military. And then the other person he spends a lot of time with is also a science teacher, but not physically fit. So it's a lot of fun to watch. Actually, I think it's the guy is the guy from werewolves within. Yeah, the African American gentlemen. Oh, okay. Yeah, well, I like him. Do they ever explain why they couldn't just go back far enough in time to get us ready for when these aliens show up and stop them? I think if they do explain why the timeline works is in so far as they're not consistently going further and further back in time, I believe there's a set amount of time that they can go back to and then every day that passes, there is a day that passes here. So if you go into the future, and it's like a week later, it's a week later there. Yeah, that's some pretty shaky time travel bullsh. like yeah, it's like a beginning in it. And that's constantly moving at the same pace. Interesting. Yeah, but they also tell you we literally duct tape this together. It's shocking. It works at all. We just needed to have some solution. So I think that helps a little bit. With the it's fucking crazy. It's a fucking crazy movie. A thumbs up from you though. Yeah, it should not be good. It should be garbage. I really enjoyed it. Look, I'll tell you this. I have very little faith in your opinion. I told me I would like geostorm Yeah, and I watched that piece of shit. I fucking loved it. So I have to check out tomorrow Warner. I think you should. I'm sorry for all the weird potholes you're definitely going to be annoyed by. But it's so fun. It's so fun. The monsters are so good. Well, well, You two seem to continually get divergent in your opinions of others. Your combined opinions of large scale action movies. No matter how shitty they show works. I'm so glad I'm so glad. I can't remember if you hated the volcano movie or not. But I did but just because it was really bad. Okay. You're not wrong. Speaking of really bad, yeah. Over the last few weeks, I've been roped into my wife's want to rewatch some of the film she liked when she was a kid. Oh, no varying degrees of success. It's a series. It's one series of films. I'm now through like six or seven of these damn movies. The police academy. Holy cow. I remember the first one. Maybe even the second one when Bobcat Goldthwait shows up. first one's pretty good. Second one has moments. The third one actually is more successful than the second interesting. And then citizens on patrol or something. Yeah. Why do I know this? And I'm shocked. Berg leaves. Oh, he had had enough. Yeah. They bring in what Michael McCarty or something like that. I forgot this nice guy's name. He's very recognizable actor. The problem is, he looks like a cop that will shoot you in the face. So all these fun goofy things that he's trying to do that Gutenberg would have done feel very threatening at first, like that X Files turn when they got rid of molder and then they had like, t 2000 or whatever you're like, Oh yeah, it's a blood there's only one more I'm sorry to let you know that there is a new police academy coming up you know, it's police academy nine, the BLM movement away. Well, I think you're correct. I was with us for so long and then I got confused. But you know the, the joke of the you know, the best part of the most of these movies is the guy that makes the sound effects. Yeah, sure. But unfortunately, every movie decides he has to do that thing where he moves his mouth and speaks incorrectly like watching an old bad dubbed Hong Kong movie right. After four movies, you can find out something new for this guy. Yeah, boy, what's that guy? Michael Winslow Is that him is popped up on YouTube in a America's Got Talent. Where he did I guess his first like this year, did his first live comedy show he's done in a very long time, because I guess his wife died in the mid early 90s. And kind of pulled him back from doing a lot of work late to bring us all down. But he was He's great. He was really good. It was very bizarre because your favorite guy Simon Cowell loved it. I have never seen that guy in anything laugh like he did on that and praise him up and down about how his comment was something to the effect. Remember, there's there's all these new school people out here and what we need to do is also have old school comedians come in and show them how it's done. Which you just did. I was like, wow. But Simon Cowell you never been older and whiter. And it just keeps getting wider and older as time good. Yes. But so yeah, that's what he's been doing. But yeah, the Yeah, it's not recommended. There was a lot of fun to watch all the Fast and the Furious movies a lot of fun to watch some of those other things. This one has been interesting. Occasionally funny, although, although I will say they do often push into this so bad. It's good kind of level of comedy, which is pretty damn refreshing. Wow, well, how about we take a little break again. Find out all the names of the police academy movies. And when we come back we are going to be talking documentary. Pizza head show. Greetings pizza and we are the Stevens transform. Pizza. Sure it is where you are now. You will tell the world weirdos. We are back. Vanessa, this was your sub genre. I'm not even sure we can call it a sub genre this time. Yeah. documentary idea. Just straight up picks a genre. But I guess it's a sub genre of horror because I picked documentaries, but I wanted it to be either about somebody who made start in or a horror film itself. I found this to be a really difficult one to to sum up like we normally do because I find you know, like trivia, and I know there's no concern, because the whole movie is kind of about the trivia Yes. And also is like a documentary is generally not three acts now and stuff like that. So I found this interesting. So I'm very curious to see what you got here. Yeah, absolutely. I you know what, I ran into the exact same problems as you and cluding like who's starring in it? And also you know, how to how to talk about these in a way that's kind of makes sense, I guess. But the the film I picked, I really am thrilled with which was scream queen. My Nightmare on Elm Street in the midst of the 1980s was scary. Freddy Krueger, I love downstreams God was obsessed, loving Freddy Krueger loving and I read on the street. The Park Zoo came along and it was just strange. For a lot of us not enough three two was our introduction to like, loving gay and then It's kind of a siren song for the queer or Mark Patton's. I mean, he's a screenplay. I wake up in the middle of the first movie that I'm the lead actor in and realize that there's a gatehub it wasn't subjects that was right there. This movie is the gayest thing. And we did vana do last month. Some of the circumstances around the making of this film created a lot of hurt for him. And people ask you about it. You say no, Mark was just so good that, you know, the mainstream public, they weren't ready for a male scream when they couldn't articulate it. I think the word is homoerotic that it wasn't found as a queer film, made a light shone on him that was completely inappropriate. The film that was poised to launch his career ended up destroying. Mark had pretty much disappeared. He was the dreaded Garbo of four. I was not an out gay actor in Hollywood. I was a gay person, and I was living in terror in the 1980s, to be clear, was to be the sort of diseased pariah. I think, in a way mark paid the price for that it was on the page of the script. And I knew we were shredding. This is not a delusion. You filmed in one of the biggest gay bars in Los Angeles. Oh, what was that again? Yeah. Oh, my God. Yes. You can play with it all you want. I want a movie star. This movie destroyed. That's what made him go a little crazy. This is 30 years ago, and you're still consulted a jazz? You've been lying for 30 years? I never wrote you know, he seems like a woman. If you don't think that this is all in 2019. Yeah. Available on shutter. I have not seen this. And yeah, so a really, really interesting dock. And part of the reason why I chose this is because I had already talked about Nightmare on Elm Street too. And since it's all about the guy who started in that movie, as one of the first basically male, last girls, final girls, right? Okay, I find it really fascinating to get some of that behind the scenes stuff. So it's co directed this, this whole film is kind of put together by some really weird random people. So there's two co directors, Roman chimenti, who has 99 sound department credits. And this is the only directing credit he's ever had. The other director slash editor, Tyler Jensen, who's known for doing a lot of music, video direction, but he really only has three other directing credits. One's a short and one's a TV episode in the All the rest is music. So it was really fascinating to be like, wow, these guys got a real handle on documentary storytelling in no time. Yeah. So I'm really impressed. And it's produced in part also by the star. Mark Patton is who we're following. In this way. You also get to see Robert England, of course, who plays Friday. A lot of interesting people being interviewed, including jack shoulder who directed the film and David cheskin, briefly, isn't it and he's the writer. And I'll get more into that shortly. And it's narrated. However, I thought this was interesting by Cecil Baldwin, who is the voice of Welcome to Night Vale. Oh, interesting. Yeah. So they got like a podcast star. So it was really like kind of an indie effort. Like, you could just feel it when looking at the kind of crew info. I am not a fan of that podcast, but that guy has a soothing voice such a good voice. I haven't listened to it, but I assume it's good because everyone loves that. I don't know. So the plot, basically after A Nightmare on Elm Street to Freddy's revenge debuted and sank. Mark Patton disappeared off the map. No one knew what had become of him. Basically, until a group of filmmakers created the documentary never sleep again in 2010, where they found him living in Mexico. He agreed with extremely sprit specific criteria to talk about his role, which kind of led him to come back to public life and to start looking at the Internet. And what people are saying on the internet, much to his horror and joy, it really inspired him to make this documentary where he could tell his side of the story of what happened with that film because he has such a unique perspective. He talks super frankly, which is exciting. His story is pretty wild. Just to get into it. In 1977 he based Luckily, he was living in a small You know, I think it was in a Midwestern towns more. He got a one way ticket to Manhattan and basically said peace out world showed up at an agency and was like, I'd love to be an actor, please. He had no idea how to do anything. And they were like, what he's like, I would like to become an actor. How do I do that? And they were like, well, you're hot. So you're gonna be in commercials. Here you go. And he just started getting this like, really quick success. Was he hot? It was a little unusual. 80s 80s he looks weird in the movie. But I think when you see him just as like a face, he has like a really Boy Next Door face. Okay, that's intriguing. He gained pretty quick success. He started with Cher on Broadway. In the show, come back to the five and dime, Billie Jean Billie Jean. It was a huge success. And then he also got to star in the Robert Altman version. And he just kind of skyrocketed to fame. He talked about how he was suddenly kissing David Bowie under the staircases and through all this, he ended up moving to LA where he was playing roles alongside George Clooney and having dinner with Merv Griffin, and he was just suddenly really hot shit. However, he had basically played a crossdresser and come to the Five and Dime chili, Billie Jean Billie Jean. Sorry, Billy Dean, Billy Dean anyway, and it's not matter. And his agents were like, Hey, man, you gotta like we need to market you and you're not marketable if you are just seen as gay. And he was, he actually is gay. And he was closeted, and did not want to ruin his career. So he was looking for Boy Next Door roles which led him to take up Nightmare on Elm Street to he read it as being a heartthrob character, and was really excited about it. And then about halfway into filming, to his horror, he realized that he was shooting a film with a really strong subtext and undercurrent of homoerotic themes. And it was kind of too late. To make it worse. He did that dance scene, which the crew basically was like, yeah, fucking awesome. So good. And if anyone has not seen this dance scene, I encourage you to go to YouTube and look it up because it is magic. It is pure, pretty crazy. It's insane. And when he was watching it in the theater, he was like, are you guys fucking kidding me? This is so bad. Why didn't you tell me? Why didn't we retake it? Why didn't we do something different? Like what the fuck. So out of this film, there was huge blowback and his agents just frickin burned him and his career pretty much became super in danger. And at the same time of this, his also closeted boyfriend, Timothy Patrick Murphy, who was a star in The Love Boat and Dallas. So really closeted because he was also a heartthrob, contracted aids and died. So as well as a lot of friends around him, this was during the big aids scare. And everyone's just kind of disappearing. And anytime your friend would stop talking to you, you just assume they were dead. That was, yeah, it was a rough fucking time. So of course, he also contracted HIV. Suddenly, the homophobia the gay bashing became norm. And he also was ghosted by all of Hollywood. So he was just like, fuck it and went to Mexico. And he ended up in a hospital for I think over a year, he nearly died several times he had at one point, tuberculosis, as well as HIV. He was fucking sick. And at that point, he started doing little doodles and the new notebook and became like an artist. He was like, yeah, I'm going to make cool art. And when he finished up, he opened a shop in Puerto Vallarta, and he met his now husband and just started having a really great life. So after the documentary came out of never sleep, again, he saw on the internet that there was a lot of anti gay sentiment in there, but also a lot of like LGBTQ kids who saw themselves on screen for the first time through his character. And he was like, you know, maybe I'll do a convention or two, maybe I'll see what this is all about. And there was so much love and inspiration and joy from these people who are coming by and meeting him that he was like, shit, I need to like, do something about this. So he went ahead, and he's basically now a gay activist. He talks openly about having HIV to his fans and to audiences so he can put a face to the disease. And he's just doing the convention circuit. really positive thing. However, he was really still angry at the people behind the film, who basically weren't taking any responsibility weren't making any sort of efforts to apologize to him or to even acknowledge how awful it ended up being for him. So he actually, in the film confronts both the director and the writer. The director jack shoulder is really distressing to watch that scene. Like he, he's tone deaf to the highest degree. It's he doesn't get what? Yeah, Warcraft doesn't understand he doesn't matter center. Yeah, it's really strange. He basically tells them like, well, I'm sorry, I'm talking to you and you seem fine. I don't I think you need to just get over your shit because I was a long time ago. And it's like, the the star of this. Mark Patton is such a sweet guy that he's like, Well, you know, he talked to me about it. And I feel really at peace with this conversation. I was like, fuck, dude, I wouldn't i'd punch him in the fucking face. But okay, although jack shoulder basically says, you know, just fucking Leave it. He does go ahead and get an interview with David cheskin. It's like one on one. That's the writer. Now, David cheskin. The problem is, initially, he completely said that there was no gay subtext. He never wrote that in there. It was total accident. But now that it's cool. He's like, yeah, I knew. I told Of course, I knew we're shooting in an s&m Club like, I mean, I've definitely knew. And of course, Robert England totally knew at the time because he was using it and the way he acted, he was caressing his face in a sexual manner. And he said he was doing it because he wanted to basically seduce him on screen. So he, he knew at first cheskin when confronted is a little like, no, like, I don't know what you guys are talking about. I you, that's the director's fault. And that's the so and so his fault. And it's not my fault that like your career, like you've needed to act better. And then he kind of shuts up and just listens. And then he genuinely does apologize, which is nice. So at the end, Mark kind of gets the thing that he needs to continue on. And yeah, that's that's what the documentary is about. It was nominated for 2021. Glad for outstanding documentary, and it's available on shutter. Wow. Yeah, it's an interesting watch. I hope he truly feels that way. Because it seemed in the movie. It didn't really feel like a resolution was reached for a while between those three people. I mean, not together. Say, how could it be? Yeah, it is harsh to say, that was a long time ago, you need to get over your shit. But quite honestly, we all need to get over our shit. Otherwise, we're just gonna carry this shit around all the time. So yeah, I think it's such a deep tragedy to have your partner die of AIDS in front of you, while you're also bombing your career at the same time, I can see that wound being so deep and knowing you can pin it on something specific, really does create a hurt that will never truly heal. He also did pretty much heal it. Yeah, oh, he was living his life just fine. And they say, you know, I'm gonna go and confront this and bring this up again, even though I did deal with it seem to have dealt with it perfectly fine. He had his business he had his husband. But then he said, You know what, let's bring this back and talk about why it was a problem and why it still can matter. So I think personally, he probably did, do what the director said, Fine, but he decided, you know, what I need to get you to also write, to go over what you've done as a creative. And the act of confrontation can sometimes be enough of a cathartic moment, because you've you've finally stood up and said, You know, this is how I feel. Yeah, the other person's response to that is not nearly as important as you finding the strength to say something. No, I totally agree. I totally agree and going from being closeted about your sexuality to straight up going up to somebody saying I'm gay. And this fucked me up. Really? Yeah, I think that is really powerful. I feel like the film it was a pretty strong interesting documentary. I think it was well told well done. It didn't feel didn't feel overly long. Yeah, just I genuinely did like it whether or not you think the subject matter is it's hard to know if you know like you guys said, there's there's pros and cons, right? Like you, you understand and also don't understand his situation and why he's like, so deep into this problem. But I think it's really interesting from a LGBTQ perspective, to watch all these people also come out of the woodwork and relate. And that was a really neat part of the documentary. That's good watching drag queens who like, like, dressed up as Friday and like introducing mark and having them talk about like, the film is really fun. I want to see this one. Yeah, it's really good. What about you guys? What did you uncover? Shall I go first? I found something that is spectacular. And it's on prime and it is called memory. The origins of alien every film is a product of its time and tells you something about the time it was made. There's a special status that comes to some films that lodge in the audience's collected imagination. Alien is certainly one of those films. Alien is a radical break with science fiction and that sanitized view of space. hanser, diggers images, they were sexual, mechanical, biological and Ridley Scott was the gift from the gods really went through the how it's gonna happen. All this innards of a cow and the blood that was really wanting this to connect to the phobias that come from our ancient past. They were all thinking about this is more than a science fiction adventure in the future. There is a commentary in there about what we're doing as human beings questions of where did life come from? What does it mean to be human scratch from global disaster about those monsters outside the movie theater? alien was talking about something that we're still not comfortable addressing. Have you guys seen this? I have not. But once you mentioned it, I was like, shut this down a really good opportunity. Is it a newer one? Or is it 2019? Okay. I could find no information for the budget box office of 37,000 which I'm assuming is all the festivals are played at Rotten Tomatoes. Critics give this 81% and the audience is at 92% and I am right there with them. Written and directed by Alexandra Oh Phillipe who did the people versus George Lucas 7852 Hitchcock shower scene and one of my favorite movies from last year that leap of faith William Friedkin on the exorcist documentary, so this guy just knocks it out of the park every time. It includes interviews with Veronica Cartwright, Tom Skerritt, Roger Corman, Diane O'Bannon, who was fam Dan's wife, and just a host of directors, actors, and even some scholars and experts in mythology, this is an experience. It's not a making of documentary. It's a thinking of documentary. Oh, is it? So it's Did you see a psycho one? Yes. So it's sort of like very similar to that. And it's really interesting. I'll get into that a little bit later. Because it's, it's like you're watching. And a speech by somebody who is so knowledgeable about the subject, and you're, you know, you're interested in the subject. So you're just kind of sitting there going, Oh, I didn't know that. Especially in a movie that, you know, we love and we know almost everything about getting this kind of look at it is really, really interesting. It's, it's super, it was super stimulating to watch it. I was just like, because I'll get into it. It makes you think about these things in a completely different way. So it's not a it's not a How did we make it movie? It's why we made it the way we made it kind of felt nice. That whole 78 What was it 7052? I think it's super interesting that he chose a film like that which had such a shocking scene. And at that he made an entire documentary that kind of is talking about that. This whole documentary is leading up to the chest versus saying, oh, okay, why. And it's really interesting that he is just like, he's kind of picked the scenes of these films that were so shocking and made such an impact on the the genre, moderate, right. So to that end, he's got all these really great interviews with like Veronica Cartwright, where she talks about being on the set, and they've got these just great, great discussions about things you don't hear about in the movie. You know, there's there's very little talk of like working with Ridley Scott. But Rhonda Cartwright has a nice story where she talks about the crew while coming in in the morning to do the chestburster scene, and the place just wreaked because they had set it up the night before and they use like animal intestines. Oh, and so on that scene, they're just you know, near vomiting and for hurt, had to be pushed into it and then kind of had that arousal so he was just right there while it was going on. And it's it's got these great shots of like the film and her reaction. Remember her reaction is kind of the one the film folks Because she gets hit with blood, and then she slips at one point. But she's. So while that shot is being played, you're hearing her discuss the stuff that was going on. And it's just edited so beautifully because she's like, She's like, I'm just horrified by the smell. I got blood on. And then I slipped. And I was like, Fuck, I slipped, I screwed my stuff up. But then she goes, and then I noticed everyone was still in the scene. So I had to get back up and pretend to still be here. I was just watching this, like, holy shit. I never got this kind of insight into a film before. Wow. Diane O'Bannon talks about diamond banding is kind of like I'm the person who is walking us through a lot of this because she was there from the beginning from the beginning of Dan writing the story and everything. And she tells the story that I thought was really interesting, because he got the, the idea for this, he was obsessed with insects on the farm where he grew up. And so that was just always something he was like mulling about and talking about with her as a young boy, he suffered from Crohn's disease, which is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder, and you see this kind of stuff seeping into the things he was writing about. And the chronic diseases what finally killed him, actually. So I thought that was super interesting, the the production and the design. And the direction of this is really interesting, because it kind of follows the look of alien. So the interviews are done in black space. And the lighting is kind of set up to have that kind of gray and green lighting to match the actual film, which I thought was really interesting and bacha daggers design. One of the things I really loved was when he when he switches to archival footage of other interviews, he pops that up on computer screens that look like you're in the restaurant. So you're watching this old interview on the screens, and it's just like fuck the production design on this documentary is as cool as the movie that it is talking about. They talk a little bit about eurocities. Dune, which is what brought Dan O'Bannon and Geiger together in the first place. And then they talk about how the the spaceship landing on the planet where it finds the derelict spaceship that was supposed to be pyramids, actually. But they had to scale it down and everything super interesting though that in for me theists. Ridley Scott goes back to that idea. So yeah, just like this is really, really interesting stuff. So so everything is circling around, you know, in regular making of movie you'd kind of talk about, you'd go beginning to end kind of and then talk about like the release of the film, none of that stuff is happening. Everything is circling around to the climax of this documentary, which is that chest bursting scene, and all of the stuff that went into it. And it's really, really interesting because they, they bring in these experts on birthing methodology talking about, you know, what this movie is really about. And the movie is about impregnation, gestation, birth transformation and stuff like that. And you're hearing these people who are all experts in completely different fields, talking about what this movie actually is saying, even though Ridley Scott was probably not saying that at all. But but this is what this movie is saying. You just can't deny that this is what's going on and what it has meant to us as a genre, or non genre, but a generation of watchers and how it has gotten into the Zeitgeist and all of this stuff. And at the end of it, I was just like, almost euphorically exhausted when the credits rolled. I was like, that was fucking amazing. And, yeah, I had a smoke. Yeah. And I went to bed and slept very soundly. That sounds so good. I love that it took such a unique approach, because I assume that all the rest has been covered, like 1000 times. It was one of those things were going into it. I was kind of like that. Is this going to be a movie like, Eric listening to a podcast? Or behind the scenes thing of Val Lewton? After we've listened to so much evallo knows, like, Is this just going to be something that I'm getting kind of get bored with because I already know it? And it was not that way at all? Well, it sounds like because I found the cycle one fascinating but lacking something. And what it was lacking is the fact that none of those people are here to talk about Yeah, so you throw that into the mix of what he did with that scene. Yeah, that's, that's a must watch. It's, it's really neat to see Veronica Cartwright talking about it because I don't feel like we get much, you know, information from her very often. And so, you know, obviously, most of the making of stuff probably has Sigourney in it and and Ridley Scott, I assume Sigourney so it sounds like she wasn't in this at all. There's some archival interviews, but I just love you know, Tom Skerritt was one of our teachers at the film school. And it's always neat to hear him talk because he's got such an interesting voice, but he's got great memories. And when you just kind of let him discuss things, and there's some some cool stuff in here with him. It's like a pleasure to just listen to this classic actor. Wow. So I must thank you, Vanessa. Very difficult. You're welcome. For sure. How do you go last? My good, Mike. Very good. But it's just a documentary. It's not a and cultural thing, like Vanessa was and it's not something totally unique and different like Kelly's was, but it's a good documentary. We need those. We need it to balance this out. This was Tales of the uncanny. Guillermo del Toro made this observation ever since humans gathered around the campfire and could talk and he's been telling stories about the dark and wet lives in Simon. Are you ready to be scared? By labelling your films short form for it's just during a medium so many anthology films reframing story where it is someone reading story, the celebration of a lot of different talents and a lot of different voices, which allow the stories to be comedic sometimes for dark is very weird. My nephew is so difficult to save favorites. I really liked the corpsman post. I mean, do I like Tales from the Crypt or what? makeup that was a seminal image on the first film poster ever designed was monsters. Gore. It was fun. There's always a lot of debate about that favorite episode was their favorite film, we interviewed over 60 people. I mean, I've seen lots of Black Sabbath Creek show, too. Yeah, that's a great one. I just was like, Ah, you were always kind of cherry picking which segments you like best I just couldn't narrow it down by point to me has always been that little segment. It's one of the most terrifying films I've ever seen. It's one of my absolute favorites was really fantastic. didn't do my work and creepy. It's my favorite. I share that sensibility with a lot of work. There's something about that human desire to want to tell scary stories. Which is a blu ray release from Sephora and it is available on YouTube rental and some called flicks fling. Check, keep showing see showing up but I've never even looked on. There's no Rotten Tomato score at all. I mean, it's not even listed. Tomatoes at all. It's directed by David Gregory, who we've talked about before on the show. He's one of the cofounders of seven films that lost souls, blood and flesh the real life and ghastly death of Al Adamson are his bigger ones. He's got that believe he did the one on folk that's currently touring film festivals on folklore. And, you know, he's got 229 directing credits because he does tons and tons of extras on seven DVDs and their documentary so he knows how to put together. And this is very well put together. You've got like Chris Alexander, who's former editor, editor of Fangoria my, my favorite writer from wrote Borg when I was reading it more regularly. Mick garris, who's you know, everybody's buddy in horror. Brian is in there. Roger Corman, Joe Dante, Ivanka Djokovic, who took over after when Chris left took over remark and also is pretty good filmmaker in her own right. So and that's just this top is is stacked with people why because it was made started to be made before the pandemic hit. So it was also done during the pandemic. So you could just call up Hey, Mr. Joe, Dante, you want to take 20 minutes and talk to us about how biology films, so tons of people show up I think far more than they ever would have had. I think there's at least 60 people that show up as talking about anthology films throughout this thing. It's largely just kind of talking about as anthology films popped up, but some of that's kind of interesting is I didn't realize that they are their origin largely comes from puppet shows. And part of that was because Fritz Lang was a puppeteer and a few other German film directors went on from puppeteering to make movies. One thing that's on the desk, which I haven't had a chance to watch it, they includes two previously unavailable, silent films that are involved that have not been released at all. That sounds like maybe TV sometime. But of course they dive in with the true start of successful anthologies being dead of night. Right, which I talked about on episode 61, where Kelly talked about nightmares, which comes up briefly and VHS to was Vanessa's pick, which also was discussed briefly here. But consider that one's considered the first horror not only first Anthology, but the first horror film from Britain. That's how they write this now for No, that means. Classic, right. And there are a few anthologies done. Orson Welles as in one, there's been a few other things that went on. But it didn't really it kind of faded. It really wasn't a big hit. During the universal years or anything along those lines. Roger Corman did one that kind of picked it up again, but not really good. All right. And then nobody really talked about again until Black Sabbath came out. Not the band The movie, which was fairly successful feature one of the was all right, but as big as plus was it had Boris Karloff in the only time he ever played a vampire. What's in that film? And he's kind of a scary ass old man vampires. Yeah, good job and hit the the one of the ones I definitely took out of here that how have I not seen and I'm definitely going to see is a is pronounced quite on. So Japanese horror anthology, considered one of the first introductions to the west have the long haired woman of death. In the same McCall, the woman of the snow. Holy shit, this looks gorgeous. And weird, gorgeous, not gorgeous locations, but incredible. Sets very obviously inside a studio. But the shit looks amazing. And apparently the director painted several of the backstops that looked wild. So that's like, Yeah, and I think it's quite an available on criterion. Because they did a whole big every time I look up for there's like five movies from criterion. That's one of them. That's it, they have their 50% off sale right now. So that is actually currently being shipped to me right now. And then the big big push to successful anthologies came in the 60s when Abacus came onto the scene. And they started up as sort of an alternative to hammer and British horror with Dr. Tears House of horror. And it was a huge hit for him because it did really well and included a segment called torture garden. What actually every segment was written by Robert Bloch lounge probably why it's good asylum did or sorry, Abacus did a great job of integrating the wraparound story is part of why I think there's so much more successful than a lot of them were bad times a wraparound story is just an annoying vehicle you got to get through, but they would integrate them in. And like the asylum one would be a story in the asylum and then you go back in the doctors would be involved. It just we've really well. Can like I said this is sort of laundry listing. After that they talked a little bit about ECS influence on anthology. And like the direct anthology influence had on the first Tales from the Crypt film in the 70s. Which really strange cryptkeeper basically a guy in a hood, like, okay, the most popular story coming out of that, of course, was john Collins during the Christmas. Yes, that was known. If you've seen anything of this, you've probably seen the image of the motorcycle rider with the skull mask. where he's, that's almost always the image I've seen from this one when you see a poster or anything like that. This was surprising. It was second to the Godfather at the box office the year it was released. Holy cow. So it was a massive part of what may be going back to Africa is part of what made their they made seven anthologies throughout their short run. And what made them so impressive is they can get anybody to be in it. It seemed if there is a major British actor around when they're making them, they appeared in one of these films at some point in time. Their cast was just incredible. So that's part of what makes them really good. It's there wasn't the stigma that the US had a little bit with anthology films are it's just a waste of time when I tell that kind of story. The British didn't have it or they didn't care because all the actress came out for it anyways. less successful one but it's it's an A lot of people's mind is the monster Club, which came out when it first came out. And they before they released it wasn't quite as kid friendly as it became but it basically they turned it into a kid's horror anthology. But yeah, pretty bad. It is pretty bad. But I think that stars I think that I watched that on Tuesday or something and it's got Peter Cushing and Boris Karloff or, you know, just everybody. Yeah, yeah, they still have great names in it. The now the British were doing films, US anthologies are short form stories, they mix them in a little bit, not too deeply, but they do briefly talk about horror anthology, like the Twilight Zone and outer limits and thriller. I didn't know this either. But one of the things that made Dario Argento so famous in Italy, because he is, at least for a time in Italy, he was George Lucas level famous. So he was making a new movie, it was front page news in Italy. And apparently, he did a horror anthology TV show where he was the introduction. He was the guy that told you what's coming up. And it was watched by 13 million out of 50 million people in a country. So it was like friends finale. Yeah. Very, very popular. And now we have TV terror. Can you guess which one I came up for this one. I'm gonna guess this is like, and I think that I know, it's a trilogy of terror. Yes. And it's got pretty easily the most famous segment probably of any anthology ever, which is prey written by Richard Matheson, starring Karen black directed by Dan Curtis. And Brian use the mentioned that Oh, yeah, of course, was an influence for dolls and the puppet master movies. Rebecca mckendree makes a brief thing where she talks a little bit about that at night, and the 70s version, there's a 70s film with the exact same night called that a night with by Dan Curtis, also written by Richard Matheson. We were around in the 80s. There is a Freddy TV series that was on for a little while. There's the as talked about on this show by Kelly a few times. They're very successful overall successful reboot. Well, not ratings wise. But the Twilight Zone reboot was pretty good. Yeah, in the 80s. Yeah. Of course, then came Tales from the Crypt on HBO, which was a giant hit. Which the 80s anthologies tend to be more humor based. So you have a lot of humor in there. And of course, which creep show is the master of the 80s anthology. And, boy, there was tons and tons of praise for that, except for one guy said he didn't like group show, but he was the only one. We had also had Tales from the hood, which came out as a fairly unique one entirely black creative segments, and one of the only one at this point except for making more apparently there's going to be Tales from the hood sequels being produced. One I recommended you might try from seven but I don't know if you should have been called family portraits, which is a dark, deeply disturbing anthology about families or trigger tree came out and the ABCs movies, although there's one they're talking about here. I hadn't heard about either. We get seen southbound. I have. I've heard of it. Really good. Not yet. It's got one decent segment and they do a neat thing with the wraparound where they kind of tie it into all of the stories. Okay, cool. Yeah, that's what looked good. The segment they showed the wraparound look like all right, and a all female anthology called xx which had larger budgets than the VHS movies or the ABCs of horror. So that's largely what this movie is just kind of talking about as they came out but they do end I will give you one of the two top five lists you have to watch it if you want the other one. Top Five anthology films overall. Number five, quite on Japanese when we talked about four from beyond the grave which I don't think I mentioned it I don't remember them talking about much either. Number two Tales from the Crypt by Abacus. Or number three, excuse me, number two dead of night. The original Of course, number one creep show. So that one guy really was the only one right he was wrong. Then I'll leave this one blank you can watch and if you want to find out but they also did best segments however, I guarantee you you can guess number one you know it's the number one segment of all every of all anthologies. I would have thought it was the Joan Collins Santa Claus. Pray. Oh, pray of course. But I'll bet that's on the list though because they talked a lot about how much they love that one. Yeah, I've got my notes at the end like you started out on this segment where it's well, it's kind of hard to talk about. It's interesting. The doc is all of the notes and trivia. So I have not. But it's, it's fun. It's worth watching. It's interesting, especially if you're interested in that kind of under appreciated, or form. And you can definitely put a list of films together watching this to check out because they talked about a lot of really good ones that are available. Nice. What is that on again? That is severan blu ray release, but it's also available YouTube. Cool. Welcome, guys. I think that means it's my choice for the next episode. Yeah. I have got, I think, a fun idea. And I'm calling it future imperfect. So your movie has to be set in the future, but it has to be set in the future of the time it was made. And in our actual past. I like so Blade Runner would be absolutely acceptable because it takes place in 2017. Blade Runner 2049 is right out. Yes. So or Death Race. 2000. That one works because it was made in the 70s and set in 2000. So something like that. Alright, cool. I love that. I love it too. That brings us into the end where we have to talk about Eric who run shirts. Oh, underwear. I didn't see those. Very quickly showing you those. Yeah. Oh, my God. I need more than whiskey. Yeah, yeah, we're working on getting the Strange Aeons. Shop up I guess you could say with our logo on things we've got Danny's got our the his Etsy that has a few things on it. But we're going to be doing more of the official logo stuff. And the underwear Kelly mentioned is actually kind of cool. It's an all over print. And it's not just like a badge on the front or the back or something. Just right on the butt. Aim here. B but pretty nice shirts. We had some samples sent to us so you can check out my sure that a nice quality. So I think it's going to be something worth doing. Yeah, and Danny's got the coins available for sale. And I got tagged in a Instagram post from someone biblio Rex Maximus, I do not know who this is. But he posted a picture of the Strange Aeons challenge coin and said some very nice things about us. So thank you very much. If I know you personally, you should send me something because I couldn't tell from the name who this was. So yeah, all very cool stuff. I want to thank everyone who is participating in this value for value model. You know, I moved out completely out of the house and I took all the money that we have. And I got myself a couple of hookers and a bunch of blows celebrated. Thanks, guys. I think it's really working out the way I hoped. And thanks everyone is liking and sharing posts, and reaching out and just saying nice things. Ron, thank you so much for always including us and stuff that you're doing. I really appreciate that. Danny of course is an absolute Angel. sent from the gods below. I noticed we had a speed challenge or Danny was upset that he wasn't the first to share that Ryan beat him I read him to that. I love that everybody is that involved in this kind of stuff makes me feel good. Keep trying. So Alright, guys, that was the first episode in the new studio. What do you think? You know, change is always hard. But um, but yeah, it's it's nice. Like, I feel like all the weather issues that were really on it made it a challenging, rewarding sometimes. Yeah, I mean, I never thought too much about it. But now that I don't have to think about it at all. I'm like, Oh, this is my mind to actually think about the podcast. Instead of the sweat running down my whole focus on what they're saying. The seagulls dive bomb crows, which was fun, which was fine. So okay, well, we will be back here in one week and we are going to be talking future imperfect. Our shows recorded somewhere high above Naval Station Everett at the nexus of all realities, and is engineered and produced by Eric Margaret. Our theme music is Strange Aeons part one by the band night shade is used with permission. Fine, Strange Aeons radio on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Wherever find podcasts. Oh my god, I need more than whiskey.