Strange Aeons Radio

150 HOST STORIES!

December 16, 2021 Strange Aeons Radio Season 3 Episode 150
Strange Aeons Radio
150 HOST STORIES!
Show Notes Transcript

150 HOST STORIES!

It's Strangeapalooza as the gang gets into their backgrounds, their future plans, and listener questions! Also discussed: A Thousand Fangs, The Vigil, Dark Angel.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/strangeaeonsr)
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I'm sorry did I break your concentration somewhere between science and superstition such sigh to show you strange aeons. Welcome to strange aeons radio episode 150. That's Eric over there, huh? Holy shit. 150 Hello. That's Vanessa over there. Hello. That makes me Kelly. Yeah. 150 episodes you guys will get this figured out yet. Yeah. One day we'll have a we'll have everything ironed out. Give you guys a little peek behind the curtains. I had something cool planned. I have a bottle of champagne in the refrigerator. I was gonna pop it live on air. I was gonna put some ice cubes and bucks here so that we could drink it while we were celebrating everything. But I spent last night with Carlos Zamora and oh, the idea of drinking. Literally turning my stuff. Maybe for like years. That's a little scary. Had a lot to drink. Oh my god. Like God, I can't even I'm not gonna ask how many glasses? How many bottles? Did you? Well, let's just let's not live in half. But it was it was a fight night he invited me down for the UFC fight. And he introduced me to pork tamales which I'd never had. And and then we drank and drink and drink. We even recorded a real quick episode that I am sure we'll never see the light of day. Oh, I heard it. I hope it never. Well, I did drop a bunch of em bombs. And as he made sure to let me know that he does not edit anything. Yeah, yeah. That we we talked about the live show at Emerald City Comicon, which he was nice enough to show up and even took some pictures of us. And we finally have pictures of the three of us together in a space. And as he said something, Eric, I'm still not sure how to take this. He goes, he goes after see you guys live show. I realize how much work Eric puts in. Oh, he goes oh, no, no, I mean that as a compliment. I'm like, ooh. That's nice thing to say, bro. Oh, I know why you guys at it. I don't personally, but I know. That strange speaking. at Emerald City, we released our live show a couple a couple episodes ago. But this is the first time we're actually recording since that Guy Show. And that was fun. Fun. It was so fun. It was I mean, it was so nice to be able to see our audience and interact with our audience and have them. I mean, there was at least 15 I think there was 10. No, I had a certain number of coins like 12 or 15 coins. And I gave out every single one. Oh, fantastic. So we were more than 10 because it was a smaller audience than our crypto con audience, which was really strange to me. But then, I mean, you walk the floor at Emerald City. It was deserted. There was not a lot of people. And I think going to we were one of the later panels in the day and the panels panel in the day. Yeah, they're like shoved in the corner of a building. So it was like, just finding where our panel was. It took me a hot minute. I was like What floor? Where is this is it's very Harry Potter. It's like between two, two spaces. You're like, alright, are there other panels that were before us and stuff that weren't equally? Oh, no. Yeah, it was. One thing I liked was it was a bunch of people that didn't know who we are. Yes, that was which I thought was really cool. Except none of the cute redhead girl in the front row who had listened to us that day and decided to come see. So thank you very much. Redhead girl. By day, yes. With the mask on. I was like, do I know. She looks a lot like my friend that I used to work with Haley. And I was like, is that Haley? Like, really? Sure it was and then I was like, Oh, it must not be. Hey, Vanessa, instead of we start I started listening to you today. And I was like, Alright, that was neat. And then of course, we retired to the bar across the street where our first round was bought by Danny Wilford. Thanks, Danny. He was texting and trying to be coy about it. He's like so where do you guys go after this? What bar and all this and I was like, oh, please tell me you're in town and you're gonna last and say hi to everybody. But he did the next best thing and and PayPal the us some money than we bought around for everybody and Carlos joined us for that. And Austin and it was a that was really the most fun was being able to sit with you guys and have a drink and yeah, so rarely do we get to just like hang out and relax and well I guess the show is also that but more alcohol and different ambience. Yeah, well, yeah, we can stay more alcohol. I mean, I don't know how many drinks we have there. But I didn't even get a light buzz on. Everything was watered down so much. I was pretty good. I was pretty good. But it was a hotel fancy hotel poor. Yeah, hello strikes. We had a very flamboyantly gay bartender there when Eric and I had dinner there earlier. And I was I think he was hitting on me. I hope he was hitting on me. Because I get out my my little vaccine thing, because in Seattle, you have to show your vaccine card to get into a bar and all that. And I get that out and he starts just asking us for drinks and I said, Do you need to see my card? He goes, trust you. Like getting hit? Yeah, I think he had the opposite opinion. I mean, when he I ordered some tater tots with a salad and he brings out the container of ketchup. That was weird. And it was obviously like it was like a little mascot of the tear open. ketchup packets. Yeah. All torn open. All of them torn, open and empty. I'm not a big fan of ketchup. So it's not that big a deal. But this is weird. It was weird. That was a weird flex. He was obviously trying to get rid of you. Yeah, check. This guy goes away. Make room for me at the table. I was just like, you don't see somebody that flamboyantly gay outside of a movie. I mean, it was me. Ah, my head it all fresh myself. But yeah, that was our Emerald City show. It was a blast. Thanks for everybody who came out? I wonder if we have new listeners? I hope so. Yeah. If you're listening, feel free to say hi. On any one of the social media sites out there that we're on or anything? We're on a we're on all of them. For the most part. I don't know. For what what are the kids on? We don't have a tick tock though. Well, actually, technically, I think we do. Oh, we have a tick tock. I think I claim the name but never done anything with it. Ah. Okay. Besides all of that, mica sent in some money in a request, and I watched Oh, Dark Angel. Now he was saying he was the I think he called it the criminally underrated gem that's pushing it. I I was a little surprised when it started because I saw this movie a long time ago when it was titled I come in peace. And yeah, that's what I thought. Yeah. This is not a good movie Mica. However, I had a good time with it. If you're not familiar with the premise, Dolph Lundgren plays a cop in Los Angeles when these two aliens show up and they're both big, huge muscle bound One of them's a bad guy, one of them's good guy. The bad guy is here to harvest our endorphins, which is a highly, highly illegal drug from where they're at. And the good guy is trying to take him into custody but the good guy is killed pretty quickly which leaves it all up to Dolf annoying sidekick to try and take down there is a lot of fun there's a flying CD this guy shoots out of his wrist that slices everybody's throats and then comes back to him and all that and I kind of like that the CD is tuned to our brainwaves or something so it just attacks humans when it's let loose. Um, it was directed by Craig Baxley who did the actually criminally underrated Action Jackson. It's all good news. Yes. And the Brian Bosworth Stone Cold got not a real huge hit here in the Seattle area. And it was written by a man named Leonard moss Jr. and I was like, I got to know what else this guy's done. Well, for some reason, he changed his name to David cap afterwards and then wrote Jurassic Park Mission Impossible Stir of Echoes Indiana Jones, the Crystal Skull death becomes her Panic Room Spider Man War of the Worlds and about 20 Other gigantic movies holy. Yeah, that was the most interesting thing about it was like whoa, why did this guy feel he had to change his name after this movie? I don't know. I did like it. The there's a couple of really stupid things at the end where Dolf has to fight this. This gigantic alien which is just a human looking dude with wide eyes. The best part though, is the only English he knows is I come in peace. Oh no. It just says that before he kills everybody. Like this is kind of clever. It's fun. It's fun. I had a good time with it. Thanks, Mica. Well, that's good. I remember watching it and never needing to see it again. Yeah, I think it's I think it's actually legally underrated. Okay. Probably right where it belongs. Oh, very cool. Well, um, I feel like I'm always playing catch up with you guys as far as as far as the things I watch, but I did finally get to see advent calendar. Oh, nice. We haven't talked about. Oh, we haven't ever. Oh, man. That's a fun film. Oh, fun. Is it? Okay, well, it was a fun, Christmassy horror film, maybe my new favorite Christmas horror film. I was really surprised at how good that was. Yeah, it was good. Much better than I was expecting. Not I mean, shutter is kind of great at doing that, like, giving us stuff that I was like, Oh, I didn't know I needed to see this. But now I know that I have and it's, yeah, it's definitely going on my Christmas rotation. Yeah. Did you talk about it last time, or I don't remember my send me a text or something. I think I just mentioned, you need to see this one. Yeah. But yeah, I don't think we've talked about on the show. Because the Emerald City and all that I got in the way we probably were at Emerald City and you're talking about it? Sounds right. Yeah. Whatever it was, what a great recommendation. I was like, this movie was not at all what I was expecting. Yeah. Plus, I want that fucking Advent box. Oh, great design. And the character attached to said box is so fucking hilarious. I'm like, where are you going? No, but also, it's like, what is that? Yeah, I mean, the air is a creature. It's i Yeah. I mean, that was a wild decision. For the design of the creature. There is a lot of wild decisions in this. I mean, just a lot of big, interesting risky moves that I think mostly really pay off. Yeah. And all held together by that lead. She was fucking great. She was so that was really good. I mean, like the intro of her being in a wheelchair and just instantly setting up a whole bunch of her life. Yeah, in that one scene with the guy at the polls. I thought this is just gonna be a well written film. Yeah. But I think the only part that I really cringed during was the doll. The the female doll that she has. Oh, yes, that was okay. That was a lot for me. It was the dog for me. That was that was yes. Like, oh, she's not Oh, my God. Yes. Well, in the rules. I think the rules were a little confusing at first, because it was like, if you eat one of the candies in the advent calendar, you must eat them all. But then other people are eating them. And I was like, I guess it just has to be that somebody eats these? Yeah, I felt like she. She understood that. Oh, this one is not for me. Yeah. So yeah. She just had to follow all the rules. Yep. And no one else need to worry about it. Interesting. Interesting. But yeah, and I actually really enjoyed the way they wrap things up. I thought that was a really strong choice. Yeah. Yeah. Hard to make something like that pay off. Yeah, that's on shutter, which is still like $6 a month? Yes. You need shutter? Yeah. Make make Yeah. Let's see which one should I talk about? First? I will talk about a weird one. four by four. Not familiar with this one. I think it's on Amazon Prime. I think I saw that in Home Depot. Probably. It's a one of those kind of buried stories where a car thief busts into somebody's SUV and gets trapped inside by the owner. I saw the trailer for this now. Okay. And I remember watching the movie, and thoughts going through my head of why don't you do this or this? And they they sort answered them and they started didn't. So it's, it's good. But it in the whole big way. It also sort of doesn't work at all, like I thought buried worked. Fantastic. And this has too many weird little variables in our car on a busy street and never really gets ticketed or towed. And it's sounds like it's there for a very long time. And little things, but I'm so glad I watched it. It was interesting. I think it's from Brazil or Spain. Yeah, I was gonna ask where this was coming from. It's fine. It just has it has a lot of that kind of where you're sort of when you yell at the horror movies don't separate people. There's moments in there where you're going, Well, why aren't you? You're using the crowbar against the steel of the side of the truck. I know. You found out the windows are bulletproof, but You can break bulletproof if you can bust through the scale of us car. Yes. You got no time you got nothing but time. So you just bang on the glass a little things like that. But overall it was good and the leads performances, kind of why it worked. So the premises this guy tries to break into this guy gets into this truck, and then he is trapped inside the truck. Yes, because the truck is designed to trap somebody who breaks in Okay. Yep. What a weird thing to decide to do with your time, I'm going to make a car that someone could break into, and then I can trap them. Yeah, that's exactly what it is. And it's got the intercom the call system. So he calls and talks to the guy and explains why he's there and why he's doing it. So it's, it's worth watching, but it will have those moments where you're watching, well, wouldn't this solve your problem? But overall, check it out. If you like buried, it's probably gonna be some you're like, I am been watching something that you guys are gonna fucking go crazy for. Got a listener named Michael Bronzo. And he had suggested something called 1000 fangs, which is on HBO, it is a series Spanish language. So I don't know where it's actually coming out of though feels like you know, Columbia or something like that. It is military horror. It is this group of Special Force Special Forces unit that gets dropped in behind, you know, some enemy lines or something in this jungle and they're there to basically take out this drug lord that they want dead. And then everything goes to shit. And and I'm still I'm like four episodes in. There's something supernatural going on here. Because they have stumbled upon this. These weird stone pillars that is kind of making everybody go crazy. I can't tell if it's just cannibalism, but there is some kind of weird slimy monster things too. And then maybe like super fast, smart monkeys or something? arrows, and I'm just like, you know, I want you guys out of the house so I can finish this fun series. Is that good? Wow, this is the coolest thing I've seen in forever. So I 1000 fans on HBO, check it out. And thank you, Michael, for the recommend. Well, that sounds incredible. Um, so? Yeah. Well, I've been watching something that I think both of you have also been watching, which is continuing to see Hawkeye. Sure. Yeah. Yeah, I really want to like this show. That's exactly how I feel like, I think I'm trying to pin down what it is that isn't working. Because I love the dialogue. I love the characters exchange. I love the actions pretty decent. I think it might be the music. I'm trying to work it out. Because like, there's just something that always feels a little flat and a little off. And I was like, I don't think it's the editing. What is this? I think it's the music choices are not working for me. And it's never getting me in the right headspace for what's happening in the scene. Because I'm always like, I like in theory, what's going on, but sometimes I'm bored or sometimes I just feel like unengaged. And I wonder if it's that. I don't know. I haven't heard. I think Eric, you liked this? Yeah, yeah, I'm diggin it. I mean, it's not great. Not the greatest of the Marvel series, but I like it. I have a theory. And that is, because I like every season of Daredevil. Better than any of the stuff I've seen on Disney plus, yeah. And even you know, like that first season of Luke Cage. I like that better than anything. I've seen one division, all of these things, even though I like all of that stuff. And I think that there is a little bit of laziness with these Disney movies, because they can tie directly to the movies, right? And the, the Netflix Marvel movies, they couldn't. I mean, for whatever reason, they would talk about, you know, the event and stuff like that, but they they couldn't bring in the characters from movies and shit like that, right? So they were forced to really write harder. And this is this feels like, yeah, we've got Hawkeye in our Hawkeye series. He's an adventurer. I feel like almost not quite the opposite. But I feel like the word for me is careful. I feel like they're constantly being very careful. We don't want to expose this characters who early we don't want to talk about this thing yet, because maybe we'll use it down the road. We don't want to freak out people who already like this particular thing. I almost wonder if they've gotten their head in the wrong space because they're so like paranoid about how they can play things. And I think it's I think you're onto something with the Netflix one. Because it's safe. The show is safe. Yeah. Yeah, I can say yeah, Huck, Daredevil and Luke Cage were rough and intense and credibly violent at times the Punisher was insanely violent. Well, and that might be something that maybe Disney plus just doesn't feel comfortable with. Yeah, that they could have done a show like The Punisher on Disney plus, no. I mean, the guy is shooting arrows at people all over the place and right you're not getting anybody violently torn apart. I mean, what's the roughest thing on Disney? Like? Maybe Mandalorian? Which isn't, you know? Yeah, it's I mean, if death as a shot as a side note, do you guys watch any that Beatles documentary? No, it's fucking amazing. Except for it makes you want to just throttle Yoko who's sitting there the entire time, while these guys are making history and writing their next album, and she's like eating a chocolate bar and reading the paper or something like that. And it's like, why are you here? But anyway, Peter Jackson had to fight because Disney wanted to. Because they swear it's it's a live thing while they're writing. You know, and, and Disney wanted to edit the swearing out. No. And Peter Jackson was like, this is history. And he, you know, got them to relent on it. But that's what we're dealing with on Disney plus is they got to be so yeah, yeah, the Hawkeye series is a fancy W I'm lean closer to the CW style. Better in that it's better than those. Yes. So it sits between that and there and Netflix. But yeah, the Netflix ones are a lot better. Yeah, I did like how, I mean, with this latest episode, without giving too much away, it does tie into the end of the Black Widow. Movie. I was like, Oh, I forgot about that. And, you know, there's a lot of hints of potential people who might be showing up in the next few episode. Yeah. And including tying in some of that Netflix stuff. So Well, yeah. The comics that echo is the what the god daughter of the kingpin? Yep. No, that would be an easy way to pull him in at the very least. And absolutely, maybe Daredevil. That will be cool. Yeah. Yeah. Let's see the other one. I was by the way, that had to be the geekiest thing we have ever all talked. All knew exactly what they were. Good point. And I held my tongue on so many more geeky things, but that's okay. You don't need to hold your tongue on geeky things on this show. Ah. Speaking of an geeky watched movie called the vigil with Have you seen this one? Yeah. Yeah, or Yeah, like this? Yeah, it's a combination of interesting things for it's a well done horror movie. It's well acted. And it's a style of film that really hasn't been told much the Jewish perspective on death. And the idea of somebody sitting with the body until it's ready to write be processed. credibly well acted. Yeah, and some genuinely creepy shit happens and I just think it's just good. It's just nice solid well made horror film. And it's one of those two that just has that natural reaction. Start watching Oh, this was PG 13 Yeah, this is PG 13 done right. It's It's creepy and scary and but so I would definitely recommend that one. Yeah, I like that one a lot. I was just thinking a PG 13 And I think it's on I think it's on the Disney stuff where they will show like you know contained scenes of smoking Yeah, you guys Netflix does that too. Yeah, no, maybe it is Netflix I'm thinking over they were they do that and it'll be like, you know contains sexual situations nudity and smoking. Oh, that's That's it was on Ozark I've you know I've been Oh, done Ozark Yeah. And I'm like, You guys didn't even mention the part where these people are graphically getting their brains blown out but the smoking we want to make sure kids are taken over that's like the Indian film sometimes we'll have when somebody's smoking on screen. They put words on the screen. Oh, wow. Okay, yeah. Wow. Yeah, I wonder if when some certain films start popping up on Disney plus if they're going to have to be like contains gay like just be aware Oh by all y'all gay Oh everybody's happy this movie be prepped? I mean, cuz it's it's the same crowd and to a certain extent is the hallmark crowd right like people who are often of certain religious affiliations are the ones who are you know, buying those those Disney movies going? It's safe for my kid. Absolutely. You're not safe anymore. You know what isn't safe. This episode of strange aeons radio, right? How about we take a break and when we come back, we're answering your burning questions like sands through the hourglass so are the days of our life these are the days of our lives we have returned and we've got something different going on this time we asked people for questions and wanted to make this kind of like the projection booth which does ego fest I think we'll call ours. Stranger Palooza or something like that go. But I had my own questions about you guys. Oh, stuff like that. One of them. Vanessa was, I found out the when we were at Emerald City Comic Con, and you are saying, oh, yeah, I just I teach right around the corner and all this stuff. And I was like, you really need to explain to me the teaching part of your life because I didn't. I thought that you occasionally taught a course or something like this. But this sounds like a It's a daily job. It's not daily, it's once a week. But it's for five hours. Right? So I mean, are you a teacher? Did you go to school to be a teacher? Oh, how do you teach, I got secretly I kind of have always wanted to be a teacher. Oh, you could totally do it. Um, I had an all girls school. We have less of us. Um, I kind of got tricked into it. But I've done a lot of teaching ever since I graduated from film school. So when I first graduated, one of my early jobs was to teach like a little bit of instruction on editing and like introduction of filmmaking to others, you know, upcoming students into like youth camps. And then I didn't really go to school for teaching. It's just the the current job that I've got a friend of mine who's a DP in town bliss, Holloway is incredible, incredible filmmaker, he got roped into a program for Seattle Central visual media program, just as like a teacher. And then all of a sudden, he became in charge of the whole program. And he was scrambling for people who could jump in and teach things. And it turns out, I have two master's degrees, which means I'm super qualified to teach, apparently. And I get a slightly higher pay bump. And he was like, Oh, hey, could you like Teach this introduction to editing class? And this was three or four years ago. And I was like, I'm sure for this, like two year program where kids are learning visual media. And so I started doing that kids is in as an adult adult kids. Yeah, yeah. So it's community college. So my kid, my kids, the students I have, are aged between pretty much like 18 and 100. You know, like, you have like a huge, huge, huge range. And this year, it's actually really great because the pandemic meant a lot of people quit their jobs. And so now I have a lot of very dedicated students who are excited to learn something new, which I love, and they're not just floundering, which is fantastic. But yeah, so I've been teaching intro to editing on and off with them. And currently, I'm doing this sort of collaborative class where students get like a really quick intro, a five week Crash Course, on how to like, what film is I break down narrative and film through structure. So first day, we talked about shot sizes, and how that tells your audience what they're looking at. So close up means you're emotionally very close to the scene, wide shot, you're getting information. Secondary, we talked about, you know, editing, then we talked about sound design. By the time we're done, you know, hopefully, they can watch a film and really have it ruined for them. That's my goal. That was like when we went to film school, it was like, after, you know, learning the code of film, now, you're just like, you, you can't not see it. No, completely. And I mean, that's one of my favorite and the best. And the worst thing about going to film school is you will never see a film the same way again, because you can see all the trappings and all the structure and what goes into it. And while I was in the middle of learning, editing, I went and saw the prestige in a theater. I probably told you guys about this and the theater on Tottenham Court Road and the middle of the movie, or read, a giant red screen flashed up and it said media offline for like, a frame. And I was like, oh, I know what that is. I get that all the time now. And so it was like, it was such a great moment for me to be like, Oh, I can see through what's happening here and just really felt empowering. So I'm trying to get that to these kids so they can watch a film and be like, Oh, the sound design is doing this right now. And it's trying to make me think that we're outside or this is happening, or it's just a lot of fun. It's a lot of fun. It is not my full time job. I don't consider myself a teacher, but it's something that I've been engaging with pretty consistently for a few years now. Do the the students bring you an apple? I hope not kill me. Fun fact Vanessa's allergic to apples. Hey, everyone. Okay, if any of her students are listening, bring her in orange nature hates Vanessa 100% True. What is the main crop Washington's known for Yes, apples. Allergic to grass as you can be. They want me to have shots, but I won't do it. So Kelly, I love you know, talking about our film school, which was predominantly writing. I love seeing people hide the hero's journey. But even more so I love it when it's like blatant. And people who hate the hero's journey then love a movie, where it's exactly the hero's journey. Black Panther is so blatant that the character dies. And they put him in a cave with an elixir. Bring it back to life that I wanted to stand up ago. Is everybody else watching this. That's so funny. I literally just taught that like, a few days ago, the hero's journey. And right one Yeah, and there's a really good graph online of all, you know, some really good films that follow it beat by beat. Yeah. All the really all the really good ones do. Yeah, I don't know. They're so like when we saw Goldman, William Goldman talk, yeah. Down in LA. He went to a thing we talked about. And he talked about how he thinks all this teaching of writing is stupid. I'm like, Yeah, cuz you naturally right. Yeah. Perfect. Hero's Journey. Well, yeah, it's just what you write. Right? So you don't think it can maybe can't be taught? Or it's just something you know, I'm not sure. But so watch it going. I've seen The Princess Bride there. Also, he was speaking at a seminar that we paid to go see. And he's like, Oh, nobody can teach you out. All right. Well, what are we doing here, then? Can I have my money back? Oh, so we asked for questions and all that stuff. And one of the very basic questions we got from just about everybody was knowing a little bit more about our history and everything. And I thought maybe I just kind of ask you guys, you know, like what's your what's your background? Yeah, man, a mystery. So exciting. That's why I have to keep it secret. Let's see how far back should we go? Well, how about you start after high school? It's really boring. We'll start with that. I did grow up in a small little town in Idaho. Not super small, but definitely not large, large enough that when I moved to Seattle, the University of Washington had more students than my town had. And the moved up here in the late 80s, shall we say? And went to a school that no longer exists? Oh, yeah. Both attended the Art Institute of Seattle, and then worked at the Art Institute of Seattle. A lot of the the biggest thing I probably did there was, as far as like, names somebody might recognize is stage managing and editing Allison chains. Right. So did a stage manage one of their shows. Were they at the Ballard underground? Oh, yeah. Long gone. Yeah. Which they? Every member of the band stole food from the restaurant found out here for a while. Well, they're doing you know, they're doing that right now. They're loading a bunch of stuff. And, like, I don't care at that. No, I'm just going to let this go. But and that was my sister's machine open for them, actually, and it just really layered off some synapses. I hadn't heard that name in a while. Yeah, wow. They're they're pretty good local band. But then they hired the same producers Allison chains and tried to make them sound that way, which was not their sound and it just didn't work. But anyway, so Allison chains was fun, weird little tidbit about watching that video being made, Layne Staley who goes batshit nuts in videos, he always seem to spin around and throw his hair doesn't move on a live show, at least at that time. But he just didn't move since I who gazer Yep. So it's like okay, you concentrate real hard on your guitar playing but you know when the cameras are on So you go crazy. So that was fun and editing. It was fun, got some MTV play out of the one that I edited. Had to be slightly edited because he had a big fuck on his guitar. But so that was pretty cool. And then I when I was working at Art Institute, I did the brand the audio and video rooms at night. And I can tell you, most of the audio bands that came in really bad. And the studio wasn't really that well. soundproofed. Whoa, what were they recording albums there? Yeah, I got full studio. Oh, and so I would sit and listen to the bands and stuff. And one night this band comes in, that was really good. And I was like, and the main thing here, obviously, is the drums. So I was hearing, Jeff play drums. Oh, my brother's band. Yeah. So I'm gonna Well, this is a good band down and, you know, pouring my way into the studio or something like that. Because I probably knew whoever the engineer was. I wonder what they were doing there because I didn't know they ever recorded there. I think it was a demo thing. It didn't seem like a fall. That's right. Because we were shooting the video. I'm skipping ahead. Well, we're, that's yeah, we started talking about hey, you guys are good. Hey, they need a video you want to help? So I worked my way into getting fired by using all the gear, yeah, from the Art Institute, and also using old videotapes from various things. Yeah. Interesting old videotapes. I deserve that Michael Bolton actually had like a little rock band thing going for a while. For some reason the video was on file at the Art Institute. Yeah. So yeah, that led to a shooting. Somebody is watching you, which is available online. You can find it. It's interesting. It's not bad. It's not great. Early, it's early, early 90s. Yeah, but some cool shots in it though. Some cool stuff in it. General stuff. I worked as far as my like, making money stuff. I worked for Suncoast video for 16 years, I think, ran four different stores open two or three renovated, two or three had the real fun job of taking over the average store after not having a manager for a month and having to fire almost the entire staff. offices, maybe your final month. Let's see what else have I done? Yeah, met Dina at work. I met my my wife at work when she was I was the assistant manager. But hashtag me too. I'm not quite sure you know where to go with other stuff. No, I mean, I think that's what people wanted to know is, you know, how you ended up here and all that. So yeah. And currently you're working with the crypto con crew right? Film Festival? Yeah. Tell me how you stuff got involved in crypto con. Because you were there year one? Yeah. Yeah, I was at I was running horror panels for Norwescon. Ah, okay. And guy who, oh, leave his name out of this. It came at a tat approached me about doing the convention. And so I came on and programmed a whole bunch of stuff and almost everything, except for guests. B or two or three. And then some shit went down. That was really bad. And Troy took over and kind of brought me to stay on just been fluid since then just up and down, who's going to work with where you're going to go? Did the panels for a while got sick of that? Because that's a pain. And then I'll do the film festival. Much more fun. And then various editing things. I'm actually currently in the middle of remastering something Kelly and I did in 2019 99 2000. That I think the more I watch it, though, I think it's going to be very interesting for younger audiences to see now it's a documentary about waiting in line to see the Phantom Menace for a month. Or the group of people just got the parking lot next to cinema Cinerama and set up campers and stayed there for a month. That's incredible. Yeah, that was wild. Yeah, that'd be really fun to check out once you've gone through it. Yeah. Yeah. It's It's better. It's better than I remember. Which is very cool. Yeah. And then needs just needs some reworking and we may do some new interviews and that's so cool. Well, what about you? I think everybody's heard kind of my story. I don't know. I feel like there's some holes. For me. I don't even know where I know almost nothing about you up until you went to film school. I feel Hey, let's see. So I was raised in a tiny town by the border called named Bellingham. And when I graduated, my parents said, Well, we're moving to Hawaii. Oh, wow. And I was like, Oh, what am I doing? My mom was like, Yeah, figure it out. So I sold all my comics. And I drove my shitty 76 Chevy Monza down to Los Angeles, I had a novel. And I knew a guy who was a photographer was gonna let me stay in his garage and, and work for him. And I did that for about a year and a half. He was a playboy photographer. It was a a exciting time. I shot my novel around and everybody let me know it was pretty bad. And but one of the people who read it was a guy named Dick Morgan, who was a writer down there who had written episodes of loss in space and the Land of the Lost and shit like that. And anyway, he read it. And he was like, Have you ever thought of writing screenplays, your your writing is not flowery enough for novels. But for screenplays, and I was like, I don't know. And so he handed me some screenplays. And like, went off above my head, I was like, Oh, this is what I want you to write to the point and, you know, 100 pages. And so I started doing that. And then I moved back up here, met Eric, because of my brother's band, my brother was in a band in the 80s, that was almost big. They were called Q five, and they had a hit in Europe. And they reformed, or at least the guitarist, and my brother reformed a band called Night shade. And then now you're telling me this, and it's, it's reminding me they did a demo of four songs that got them a label for their new album, and then talking, you know, the drummer was just a piece of shit. But anyhow, he wanted to he wanted to do a video or something like that my brother stepped in. And I think that's when he was talking to you, Eric, is when he said, Well, wait a second, I'd much rather you work with my brother who has the storyline that actually the songs are kind of based in. And so I remember you and I met at a bar, probably. And, and we started talking about what we wanted to do, we had kind of lofty goals for zero budget. But those four videos turned into one video, we've got footage for other things, but there was just a pretty decent friendship and a, a desire to do something. Keep in mind, this is the time when Quentin Tarantino is coming out and Robert Rodriguez is coming out and it's like, oh, wait a second. We don't need to have a studio behind us. We could make a movie. Yeah. So I wrote a couple of scripts, and they are bad. I look back really bad. And I just remember thinking, Why won't anybody give us money? And now I look at him. No wonder nobody awful. But we, we persevered and did that thing where we stood in line with the people and then made a short film and then another short film, and then Oh, get some interest? And got some money to make our feature film? You know, and then the rest is history. We've been palling around for Yeah 30 years. Yeah, I would say Man, I wish we'd gone to the film school first and then made the movie. Yeah, it was oh, well, it is what it is. You know what the movie was not great. But boy what an education that was oh man shooting it was so much fun. And and then shopping it around you know, we went down to the American Film Market just had a blast with it, you know, flew all over to various film festivals and shit like that. I mean, all of that is like priceless information. I mean, that's stuff that I tell my students like go fuck up. You're not going to be any good for a long time. Go and fuck up. Just make stuff. Like that's the only way to learn. Well, and then you know, the American Film Market was I mean, just a wild Have you ever been down there? It is a wild experience because they they hollow out like three hotels and they take all the furniture out of the rooms and people rent the room and they've got their movie there and and you got either people selling a movie, or people buying movies and you just gonna trick or treat your way down the hallways trying to get people interested in you're dropping off CDs or DVDs of your movie and your card. Yeah, just hoping that somebody is going to call up and say, yeah, we'll buy your movie. Yep. Incredible. It was a wild thing. I remember sitting next to Carl Weathers at the bar at a drink, and I look over and he's like, Hey, how you doing? I'm like, good. He's having any luck. And I'm like, having a lot of fun. And he was like, all right. I don't work. Oh, man. Yeah, so those kind of experiences are definitely worth Yeah, whatever. They're there. They're definitely worth a lot. Was there anything in particular that made you decide to leave LA and hang out up here? He's I was 18. And just super lonely. Yeah, you know, I'd love to girlfriend up here and all of that stuff. And you know, didn't, I was broke. Now I lived in this guy's garage. But he lived. I mean, our neighbor was Sammy Hagar. Oh, so this was not a shitty garage. The garage was carpeted. I had, you know, a refrigerator and TV in there. I was actually a pretty fucking swanky garage and all that, but I was broke. So you know, LA is an expensive place to try. And but yeah, so. I don't know. It was fun. I came back up and and, you know, later on then I got into the publishing stuff. I wanted to do a comic book with this artist friend of mine. And the that led me into meeting much better artists and quite honestly, much better writers. And I was like, I actually I want to publish you guys. I don't think I need to publish me as badly as I think that I need to publish you. So that started planet Lovecraft magazine that turned into strange aeons magazine, which is when I brought Rick into the strange aeons stuff. And and you know, now we're publishing books. Wow. Yeah. And and I got to kill a podcast. That's true. It's true. Yeah. I think it's weird when you start to think about that stuff. Like Oh, yeah. I also deep heat for some people and I ab for a few things. Yeah. But I know you have done a little quite the background. Oh, God traveling and God. No kidding. You live in a different country? Yeah. Yeah. It's so I mean, much like both of you. Actually, I grew up in a pretty, pretty small place. My only had 300 people there when I was growing up. And so I grew up on a little island in the South Puget Sound. And it was a very, I didn't know, it was a very weird life. But I mean, I was like, you know, building fires everyday, because we didn't have heating. And when we first moved into the house that we had out there, when I was like, six, there was like, no front door, or carpets, or like, Well, we had one electricity socket, which we had a fridge plugged into. So it was just a really different kind of thing. And I was just so used to growing up and living in the woods and going to Catholic school. And how does I mean, tiny towns usually make tiny people, right? How does somebody with that background end up in Europe? Yeah. Well, I think that you can do one of two things. When you live in a small town under a microscope, you can either become part of it, or you can fight against it and question the whole time fellow with the balls it takes to go. Not even just to Seattle, I'm going to London. You know, I think I always had like an infatuation with, with England that I just, I grew up watching like red dwarf and I love to Korean and there was something about I know, I know. But like there was something about England that found I found really interesting. And when I graduated from high school, so my family is predominantly on my mom's side, my grandmother's from a small Bavarian town in Germany. So my mother grew up constantly going to Germany, we had this really strong German connection. And so when I graduated from high school, and my mom said, Well, we're going to go to Germany. So you can like see your grandmother's farmhouse, and where we came from, and meet all our relatives. And you can pick I'll pick two countries, and you pick two countries. And we'll like see some of Europe. Oh, wow. Yeah. And that was weird. Because for me, like we grew up so I grew up so so so poor, so having the ability to suddenly be able to go to Europe was like, Whoa, I mean, I couldn't get flavored Pop Tarts. Like we would my family would share like, we would buy a thing of sourdough bread. And there were mean three siblings a weed each just grab hunks and eat it and all of a sudden, it's like no, we get to like get I get to go on a plane. Because my mom had a new job. And it was just me at that point because I was the youngest. So it was like Wow, alright, this is insane. And so she picked Italy because she and Ben and we did Germany and then I picked him linen, Ireland. And when I was in England, I just totally fell in love with the place. I was like, hey, it's a place I speak the language. That's not where I currently am. I had no interest in the rest of the United States at that point in my life. And when I got into college, they had a study abroad program. So I was just like, oh, well, I'm studying literature. Why don't I just do it somewhere else for a while. And then once I graduated, I went back and got my master's, and then my second master's, and then went to film school there. So I just I just loved it. And it wasn't just like a summer to there. You live there for 10 years? 10 years? Yeah, for all of my 20s I live there. Oh, then why come back? That's such a good question. Um, well, I finally had a visa figure it out. Finally, there was a lot of me having to leave and come back for a new visa of one kind or another. So that was always a horrible, horrible game. But my family started aging. My mother got older, my brother had two children. And the problem with a city like London, or probably other cities, like New York, or you know, whatever, it changes so fast. And so everyone I knew would come and go, there was nobody who's just there for you can't have you can't raise a family in London. There's no, like, the escalators don't work half the time, there's no elevators at all. Like, how are you gonna get a baby around the place, like every house, like I knew four or five people who would come in together to buy a house because there's no house there under a million dollars. So you're going to, once you start working, you're going to leave London and be commuting. So that lifestyle is just not sustainable. It was a really good place to be in my 20s when I was just drinking literally every day. Oh, man. But at some point, it was like, I was very judgy. I had a great time. I had a wonderful time. But yeah, I went to you know, I went to film school out there, I loved it. But at some point, I decided to go ahead and come home and see if I could have a film crew out here. That was another thing starting filmmaking in the UK, I was the bottom of a very long list of people to get hired. So it's first everyone you know, and then everyone who's English, and then everyone who's from the EU. And then everyone who's not from the EU, I was fifth in line for every job are always. So my job at Technicolor, I got on a total fluke, when I started finally working in on something real, I want to say, because I got to work with Disney and NBC Universal content. When I when I started Technicolor. And that was literally some guy called me from my film school and was like, Oh, God, I've got some night a job that has like nights that I can't work, I've overbooked. Could you like, do this job? It starts tomorrow. And I was like, Sure. And I show up. And it's like, you put a card down and like glass doors slide open. And there's, you know, I didn't know where I was. I don't know what the job was. And they're like, Yeah, so you're going to be launching Disney XD in the UK, which is the HD channel of Disney. And we got all this content from Burbank. And we need you to go through the tapes and look for flaws and then fix any flaws you see. And then you have to go through probably about six a day, at least minimum 12 hour days. And if you don't figure it out in this week, don't worry about it. We just won't have you back. It was brutal. But that was that was my first job out there for Well, one of my early jobs out there for a couple years. So yeah. So very cool. Very, very cool. And you shot a film there. I did. This is how it all ties back in together and you go Yeah, so I shot a couple of films out there went to film school specifically for writing and directing. The writing part was shit that film school did not know they were doing for that. But the directing was really solid, really, really intensive one year program. And I made a couple of short films out of that. And one of that one of those is my first short film outside of film school. So it was the first one that was definitely like almost watchable. The rest were horrifically bad. I mean, there are some that I purposely bury, I do not want people to find and I submitted it to a bunch of festivals. It was a little fantasy short with a girl who is trying to figure out who she is and but it's it's fantasy. So she has antlers. Which I thought was very cool because forests, and I submitted it around and somehow or another I don't even know how it got into maelstrom. I don't know. I don't remember how I submitted. It was all without a box then so it was totally random. Yeah, yeah, I think I was just like, sure says fantasy and the title will submit I go Yeah, it's in Seattle. I'll I'll interject that's the mail. International Fantastic Film Festival which we started. I don't know, I think I lasted two years before I was like, you guys, I have way too much shit going on. You kept the festival going for four years, four years. Yep. Yeah, it was a really cool festival. Like, it was really, I figured out a lot of really good quality stuff, some real quality people involved with it like Isaac and and it just didn't grow a much of an audience. We never lost any money, but we never really made any either. So it just became sort of like, it was a lot of work. Yeah. Our and our primary investors like, you know, this doesn't seem to be really going anywhere. So, yeah. But But yeah, so you ended up there. And then you actually showed up? I did. I showed up. I will. It was 2008. And I was waiting for a visa yet again. I had some time. So I happen to be in Seattle, and I was um, I, you know, was was waiting on a visa that turned out wasn't going to come through. I ended up going back to the UK on different visa. But I had some downtime submitted, hurt around and got accepted in the maelstrom. And it was pretty much my rule that anything I could go and like be in person for I would because I really knew the film industry in Seattle. Didn't know anybody. So 2008 was a big year. Actually. No, I'm sorry. That was 2000. No, that was 2008. Sounds about right. Yeah. And yeah, went and met Eric, and you gave me a prize. And I was like that was I think the first time I ever won anything first first winner of Best Short Film. Yeah, I love it. I just thought was a beautiful, sweet, wonderful short thing is probably one of the best ones I ever did. Honestly, like, it just worked out. Everything worked out about it. I didn't even bother to record sound because I couldn't afford a sound guy. And so I got it. Yeah. And so instead, I got a musician to score the whole thing. And it worked perfectly. So it was the silent film. And yeah, he gave me an award. And then I did not see you again for many years. And then at a cryptic, cryptic con. Yeah, you're walking around someplace. We're outside. The previous hotel we were at? Yep. And you're walking around going. Okay, thank you, Vanessa Williams. Like, oh, my god, somebody knows. It was really cute. And so yeah, talking then he got more involved. repticon. And yeah, when Absolutely. When I was in Seattle, basically, I did some reality TV work. And then I ended up at a company called amigos where I was the head of post production. And as part of that, I would help promote their previous materials, like motivational growth, which was something that cryptic Khan had played. And so I was there for that. And I was like, Oh, my god, somebody who knows me. Like, this is really weird. Really, really weird. And then yeah, luckily, I got to go back in the future once I was freelancing, and on my own, and, you know, God said, hang out as like an actual person who actually has thoughts and opinions on movies. So very fun. That brings us so we asked for some questions and everything that brings me to one of these questions. Let me see, we printed these out. Basically, how we made the choice to have Vanessa as our co host. Oh, sir. Yeah. Always a good question. Sorta pretty straightforward. I mean, we we knew you for a couple of years, or Yeah, panels, and the drunk hallways and all that. Absolutely. And I'm not sure if we made a conscious effort that we were going to have a third co host, or if we just thought we'd have like revolving hosts. Yeah, I don't remember exactly where we sat down. I know we started you know, just bringing in people we wanted and talking to and but yeah, I don't remember it being because I don't think really, we were thinking that it was going to be a permanent co host Intel you sat in. And I was listening to the episode afterwards. I was like, I'm in love with Vanessa's voice. Greatest radio voice. And it's just nice to have. Be You know, I've got this weird gravelly voice Eric sounds like Kermit the Frog. You need somebody with a nice voice. Jeez. You guys have fantastic. Well, the funny thing is, to me, it felt very random. It was like I think I'd seen you guys not that long ago at a cryptic con. And then I don't remember who among you was probably you, Eric who asked if I wanted to, like come on and sit in on a show. And I was like, that's cool. I haven't done that. Like I'd done radio in college in England to know like, no one listened. It was like Sunday morning. Show. Yeah, there you go. It was like it was for rare FM and so I knew a little bit about doing radio stuff and having worked in production, like I knew a little bit about how to talk to a mic without editing or whatever. And so it was Like, Oh, cool. This is really fun. I had a really wonderful time. And I hadn't heard from you guys for like four months. I thought that was that. When you guys were like, Oh, hey, do you want to come on permanently? It was like, out of nowhere. And just so fucking fantastic. I was like, yes, 100% I want to be on your amazing show, talking about amazing things that I actually care about and like, never get to talk to any of my friends about Yeah, I remember because we were kind of also struggling with the idea, because we knew how far you had to come. I was like, this isn't really fair. Yes, I had moved back to the islands at that point. But it was great because I love reasons to leave the island occasionally. Otherwise, I become you know, I get covered in moss. Yeah. And you knew enough people around you that you would work out stuff. We didn't know that at the time. But you worked out visiting people and it was perfect. Having I would just plan book my days, like, you know, wall the wall and figure out what I was doing. I'm honestly really surprised to an extent though, because that first show that we did together. I remember I so over prepped. I figured out what all the films you guys were going to talk about where? And then I was like, Okay, it's my topic disaster movies. I had a stack of like 12 or 13 films I watched. Remember, I can't remember which of you said it. They were like, you don't have to watch the movies. We're gonna watch it. I was like, Oh, okay. So, yeah, it was pretty, pretty wild. Yeah. I think we did. All right with you. So yeah. It was kind of good about that. Oh, let's, let's get into some of these questions. Yep. I'm gonna I'm gonna ask this question. Let's see. We're just start here and go down or Oh, okay. Sure. Yeah, let's do that. So, yeah. So then I guess I will present to you the first question. All right. From from will stir will over in Hong Kong. I pull, right. Yes. What is your most unappealing habit? This question was to me. Yes. Well, probably being right all the time. Yes. There's a word missing in there. I mean, it's certainly you guys don't seem to like it much. You are opinionated. That's true. Hmm. Am I supposed to be that seems like something that I would That's like asking somebody if they're handsome. That's not up for me to decide to tell me what my most unappealing habit is? Sure. I mean, that guy's gonna answer that in that case. Vanessa, I'm gonna ask you also from well, what is your favorite smell Well, it's you Kelly. No, my my favorite smell is the smell of fresh laundry. Is it really it is how it's always been that I love opening a dryer and like smelling I know a lot of people say fresh grass, but I know why you would not say that now. Hell no. Clean I get that shit away from me. And I don't ever wash my clothes so I wouldn't know. Sure Wait, what's your favorites melancholy? That question wasn't for me, but I need to know Alright, sorry. Okay, so um, Eric. Yes. What is your greatest extravagance not terribly extravagant person in general, but I think it's probably over the last few years become these friggin boutique blu ray, right damn company. It's Yeah, cuz you have quite a few of those. Yeah, that's sprung up quickly. That's like three or four years now as that damn it but Jeff probably that as I sit here waiting for the the Severan Oh my god. I'm going to arrive for blocks that Yeah. I hurt my wallet. Yes. To all three of us from Will was who would play you in a biotech of your life ERIC What reef immediately struck the wind could kill you golf like you. Kevin Smith. Kevin Smith from many years ago because he's all slender and stuff now. Or Dom delouis would be fun. Looks but i You're not as much as I joke about it. You're not nearly freakish enough to Kevin Smith. That guy fucking thinks we should care what he thinks about the new Star Wars movie. Like you haven't made a good movie in 15 fucking years how you wouldn't recognize a good movie that smack down there. Oh my god, Vanessa playing you. Um, God. You know what, this is such a hard question I like I've definitely got one of those faces where people like you are vaguely familiar, but no one that I can think of looks like you. When somebody said I look like a girl from Evanescence. I know that Alyson Hannigan is a lot like me when I was in high school. So she could play young me when she was young, but now she's old. And we've diverted ways Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well, if if the one I actually honestly got when I was in high school was Jon Cryer? I got a lot of that. Yeah, how about you, Kelly? Well, I mean, the obvious choice would be like the rock, sir. With the with the special effects like that one Superbowl commercial or takes off his arms. Oh, I have no idea. I don't. I've got a pretty common base. So I think that I'd have to pick an actor who was, you know, like, similar to the way I act? Yeah. I don't know. Like, Tobey Maguire or something like that. I feel like I'm I'm a pretty low key guy. I think Mark Marin could play you just because of the anxiety No, I mean, it's the the rough around the edges kind of person who's actually really sweet inside. Oh, I appreciate that. You think I'm sweet? I know I am a bit rough around the edges. I am. I am a little more conservative than Eric a lot more conservative than you if we were just to go like political beliefs. I think that Oh, sure. I fall. A little right of center. Eric probably falls a little left to center and I think that you're a fucking communist. I do really believe in socialism. Um, no, I you know, it's funny you say that? Because I'm, I'm not sure that that's entirely true. It's just that I asked a lot of questions and I don't always tell people what I actually think about things. Yeah. So I I feel like part of my rough around the edges thing is just kind of this frustration of, I don't feel like I have changed much but the center keeps changing on that. And I'm just like, now now I might as well be fucking Clint Eastwood the way you guys what? You know what's right and what's your gonna be libertarian? Just fuck all of you. Over if you start talking to an empty chair, I will let you know. All these empty chairs but you guys leave. Recording another episode are like Oh, lordy. Oh, my God. I mean, I guess Yeah, I guess considering where things are. Yeah, it's hard. I mean, cuz you probably are really right. And I am probably all pretty left for where the world is taking things. But I'm telling you right now, Vanessa, it is tough to be a white male. When are we gonna have our time? As as somebody who is a film editor and 99 times out of 100 the only girl in the room? I never times I've had to explain to people why they should listen to me at all. Let's just Let's just take it. Take a sec. Got some questions. I will I will be here it's fine. Whatever I'm used to it. Mike is question. Thanks mica for giving us some questions. It's a burning question. At one point or another you've all talked about formative films and comics in your life. So I was curious what television series slash specials helped form the metric by which you all judge a show to be good in quotations? Yeah, so aside from Star Trek, what are the TV series and specials that you guys consider good versus just I like this. The wording of the question for me it's a little weird because I don't watch a show and go Well this show is this is three Battlestar Galactica is good, right? Maybe we should start really everything by battle cycle I would be okay. Original or the new new. Good stuff. Yeah. So but my favorite shows over the years, like Battlestar Galactica, the reboot was one that I think it was you that's I watched the film they did and it's all right. Yeah. And you said watch the what is the three minutes I think the name of the first episode. And if you don't like it after that, whatever man, and that was compelling. TV. Well, the best TV does that. I mean, that was the That was because we were in a fucking endless war. And here comes the show that was able to talk about it without talking about the war we were actually in. I think that's what makes a good show isn't it addresses that kind of stuff. Yeah. Or like I like shows that really mess with format. So something like, unfortunately lost ended up sucking. But the idea of something that has no answers and is strange and weird, but is also just super engaging, like with Battlestar, where every episode, you're like, I have to keep going. I need to understand what is happening in this thing. Yeah. So yeah, I think anything that probably starting at Quantum Leap is what I was like, Oh, my God, this is incredible. But it sucks mica that you said aside from Star Trek, because that is literally everything I hold a candle to? Oh, well, they sure Star Trek. Well, and television has certainly changed since we were originally watching it when we had three channels, or, you know, if you're lucky, you could get to a UHF channel as well or something. Like because what you want liked and enjoyed as a kid versus what you like, and enjoy now. And what you're looking for in TV is vastly different. Because I'm sure the things that you know, well, what we liked and enjoyed as a kid was just what was a? What would it whatever was on that was a I mean, what kind of food do you like in prison? Prison food. That's all you got. And so that's what you liked. Wasn't until, like, the sopranos or something going on. And weekly television was like, Holy shit, you could do this. Yeah, make a compelling story with real realistic people and all of that, you know, it wasn't just a laugh track, because the ropers think that Jack is gay. And that's why it's okay. He's living with two women is like, that's what qualified for entertainment. Yeah. And the change between what we're watching in the 80s and early 90s, and what sopranos and Buffy did, and a few of those others where I went from, hey, every before that every episode had to be its own capsulate. I'll reset to the the same thing at the end. Unless it was a season Ender, or a very special episode tonight on a very special different strokes. We're gonna make all of you horribly uncomfortable. But I guess we can rattle off a few we liked what, what is something that comes to mind for you? Well, I mean, I look back at those times when it was really hitting me how different it'd become so the sopranos, the shield. Yeah, I was just like, holy shit, because FX suddenly started doing that, too. It was one thing that pay television was doing all of this great stuff. But then when FX came out with a shield, it was like, Oh, shit, now it is on. And now it is on. I mean, you know, ABC and NBC and CBS all have really compelling. Television. Sure. Yeah. They had to bring their their game. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. So in conclusion, we really don't have a metrics if not really, but we do like, right. We do enjoy TV sometime much like a Midwest senator. I might not be able to tell you what porn is. But I know it when I see it. Oh, my God. Oh, my. Well, there is he does have one. We did that. We pretty much did that. Or background? Kind of. Okay, that's true. Yes. Yeah. But there's a question for Kelly. Oh, what action figures do I have up and why? That's right. Everything's been relegated to the back room now. But I have spent an inordinate amount of money buying the toys I used to have as a child in some, you know, futile attempt to recapture my childhood. Absolutely. And so what I've got up are these gigantic robots called the Shogun warriors, a ton of Godzilla toys from the 70s Micronauts. And that's about it might not Miko you would know. That started off as microman in Japan, and then became the transformers and all that stuff. But when microman came back to the US, they were called the Micronauts. He would definitely know that. Mica is obsessed with transformers. I got that from that gigantic Unicron thing you were telling us about? There is a room filled top to bottom with transformers. What's the one style you've got a style that's sort of a GI Joe? Ask? Yeah, I mean, I don't want to get into the nerdy history. But what just what Henschen cyborgs? GI Joe, in the 60s in America is just incredibly huge. toyline for kids. They were 12 inch tall dolls. Well, they, they shipped that over to Japan and Japan's like, well, we like the idea, but we're not big on having a bunch of American soldier toys. So they decided to make them out of clear plastic and turn them into cyborgs instead. Whoa. And so there were these 12 inch tall GI Joe dolls, but they were see through, I've got a couple of those. And then. And then because everything is tiny in Japan, they made them you know, three inches tall instead of 12 inches tall. And that's where the microman came from. And then they made them able to start transforming into things and the rest is very geeky history. I see it all on the Netflix series that made us well, it looks like we've got a different listener who has a question for all of us again, that's Andrew Byers. And he does the Friday night fight fest, podcast Fright Fest podcast that if he can get dang RSS feed going correctly, so my Zune could read it I'd listened to more often. You in Your damn. uses as a whole. Carlos was telling me. He goes, Well, I have one Zune listener now I assume that's you. Yeah, it's me. Andrew asks, as filmmakers yourselves what story novel or other literary property would you each love to adapt to the screen? I have a very easy quick answer, because there is a Robert R McCammon. Novel Oh, Stinger that I think would just make a spectacular movie very creepy. Alien horror in the desert. That's something incredible. Well, you. Um, so I actually started trying to make a property real. So I'm just go ahead and drop that one, which was a Night Trap. Which I wrote a yes. That's a video game. All right. It was a VMA video motion of the video game where they basically filmed a film and then cut it up and depending on what you click on the the people run around and do things. I remember that. Yeah, yeah. It's kind of like a really. It's like a slumber party, but with vampires, and the girls are all like having pillow fights and laughing and running around. And so I started writing it but with like actual girls with actual girl issues, and was just having such a fun time. And I think any property that has girls that were horrifically poorly written in it, I just want to take it back and be like, and then she had her period. And people like you will say, oh, boy, and that'll be great. Right, speaking of still liking fantasy, a little bit of fantasy, I'd like mine would probably be a fantasy novel by Michael Moorcock, not Elric though. The first Michael Moorcock actually read was The Chronicles of Korum. Yes, and I that would be really cool or Fred Saberhagen swords trilogy, which went on to be a whole lot more in a trilogy. But either one of those I think would be a lot of fun, I think Elric being done but I know that it's being turned into a video game it's a video game that's right. Yeah, video game. So but I don't see them ever getting deep cuts of corn I'm or the Hawk was that Hawkmoon? Or Hawk hawk? Wind hawk? Yeah, I carry the Eternal Champion series. But so I think those would be wild to adapt. I definitely be on board for those that seems like I'm old fantasy I used to love I apparently still love it's just the new fantasy. I didn't know about that. I don't want to have anything to do with steampunk. Is that what you don't like? I don't know. I feel like I like the the aesthetics of steampunk. Yeah, cuz you watch that? We didn't show didn't you are part of it. I made it through about one episode. Oh, okay. Then I'm only got a little further than much fantasy. Yeah, maybe it is the fantasy. Andrew also asked, we seem to go through waves of various styles of genres of horror, specifically, zombie vampires. What is a Shondra theme or something that you think is totally overused and wish would never appear on the big screen again? And do you think there's more something that we need more of? I will say. Either I will say this. I don't think there are any overused, themes, tropes or genres. I think there are bad writers. Interesting. So I mean, every time I think I'm tired of zombies, right, some really great zombie movie shows. Yup, theme keeps freaking happening. How so? I mean, yeah, I I'm just tired of bad writing. What sub genres do we I think we need more of Yeti for sure. Don't get a foot movies. Yeah, young adult Yeti fiction. Yeah, I mean, I think the thing that's overused for me, it's like when I watched lamb right, there are certain tropes for like a 24. There's like sort of eerie long takes. And there's certain things that indie films are now basically an genre of their own or doing. And I think that we could stop, we can go ahead and stop that now you can just go ahead and like you said, do some good writing and good filmmaking and get back to just good storytelling. You don't have to rely on if you're going to do something with the camera, do it for a reason. If you do it for a reason, it'll become timeless. If you're doing it just to be cool. It's going to age very quickly, and everyone else is probably going to do it, too. So that's, that's what RT film looks like, I have to do this, that jangling somebody's laying in a bed and they sit up and the camera goes. Yeah, got it. Yeah. Do you remember that Gus Van is Gus Van Sant period where like, he just would follow behind people for like, 15 minutes. And look, it was cool the first time. And then after that, I was like, I can't. And then everybody was doing it. And I was like, you guys, we got to go somewhere. We got to just arrive at a location and talk to another character because I can't I keep just following you. Those are ones you like, you wish you'd see more if I want. I want more fun. Earth oriented? No, actually, you know what? Demons and religious stuff that's been really fun. We've started dipping, dipping our toes more into that between like 13 coins and evil. And yeah, there's a lot of really cool stuff that I think could be tapped into further. Yeah, I would agree with you, Kelly. I don't think there's such a thing as an overused genre. But I'm really weird when it comes to shit. Once I like something. I kind of like it. Like there's always people was like, I can't believe the song has been played too much. I like the song venue. I still like it. But it takes something weird for me to hate something I used to really like. And so I don't get tired of it. Or subject, the way movies and stuff are made. Now it's hard to think of a lot of things that don't have something made of them. Yeah, there's, I mean, you mentioned demons and then immediately rattle off a bunch of demon things that are out there thinking werewolves, but now they're starting to be a lot of good werewolf movies over the last three or four years and I would Okay, here's an interesting one. The sub genre of slasher films has been completely washed. It's just neutral. It's completely stale. A new wild version of a slasher film would be interesting. If somebody could come up with a way to present it in a new and different manner. Yeah, even. I mean, even them trying to freshen up Halloween, right? You just kind of like Oh, okay. Yes. What I thought it would be looks better. It's louder. Sounds good. Still exactly what it's always been. Yeah, I think, um, oh, my God. What's the name of the film with the guy who's a slasher and they follow him and he's like, talk, it's like a documentary movie. You know, that's the rest of it. Now, behind the mask. And the mask. Yeah. Like that was like, Oh, shit. This is fun. This is different. But yeah, that I mean, those kinds of things are pretty far and few between. Andrew also asks, this is gonna be a tough one. Yeah. Especially since he names Yeah, my choice who's the best relatively unknown horror director out there that we should pay more attention to? For example, after I saw absentia and Oculus I knew that Mike Flanagan was the guy to watch for but if I hadn't caught absentia at a film festival, I wouldn't have known about him. Kind of the same exact house. Yeah. I don't know. But I do know that I'm seeing you know, like this is the this is absolutely the best time to be a film viewer. Yes. Because Netflix and shutter and all that stuff. They're playing all of this foreign horror, that there's just no way I ever would have known about so you know, there's I want to say you know that Gabriel Iglesias or whatever, but that guy's been doing movies forever. It's to me that I guess it's just that I'm finally aware of him now, you know, thanks to Netflix and shit. Yeah, so it's really tough to just pull up a new guy. Yeah, I feel like the the trick that I found is you know, watch something, you know, if you if you're watching random content on a streaming service like shatter and something really piques your interest, you know, how to do an IMDB search. And if this is their first one, then hey, like keep your eye on that person. So whoever did host I really liked that that's really interesting or the dude who did searching like I would love to see what happens next with either those people who are playing with format and doing some really novel good direction. So that's, I don't have to wait for lady that raw. Yeah, I was gonna I had that written down like raw chick. She's a good option but taking Yeah, you know it one can so it's like, is she too big already? Yeah, it's like, I don't know. She's really an unknown commodity. But yeah, sorry for nearly not giving you well answers to that question, which is the best filmmaker of all time. And who's the most overrated? I'll say the most overrated is gotta be Kevin's well, right away. I'm actually not going to disagree with you. Because his last what five or six films haven't just been bad, even Enki awful offensive was probably one of the worst movies I saw in my life. And that's one of his better ones over the last. I know. 1015 years. But her best filmmaker of all time, that's a no, it's not. John Carpenter. Oh, nevermind. I don't know what you answered. I don't know why you were wondering. Okay. No, I know. It is. It's really hard and like, you know, and it's a favorite director of all time best. No, because even if you say Ridley Scott, though, like there are plenty of Ridley Scott movies I do not like or I think are not done. Well. Ridley Scott has become the Stephen King of moviemaker. So it used to be an event when Ridley Scott knows every film every single year, he's old, and he's just churning them out. Like that was a two or three just this year. And he's up. crotchety? crotchety. Yes. I do kind of love that about him. But it's fun to read his interviews now. That's for sure. But, I mean, there's, you go back and you watch the classics, like Hitchcock or somebody I mean, it's the best is the best the person who did it first, my the person who took that first and then if we needed up to a better version, so that's gonna be Buster Keaton, over Charlie tablet like, Oh, if you put the camera in the car, you can get a real interesting shot, guys. Well, that's why Citizen Kane sits on top of so many big lists. It's a fine movie, but it did so many things first, that are now completely. I mean, almost passe. Yeah. I mean, I really like I am endlessly in awe at a filmmaker that Kelly doesn't like, which is Danielle villain. Like, I fucking love it. I love his stuff. I didn't like dune. i You didn't like any of this? Oh, no. 2049 I think is spectacular. Okay. All right there. We actually says when we saw it together in the theaters both walked out going, why are people bitching about this? I don't know why people are. Good. And anyway, but yeah, I think he's, I think he's great. I think that he is doing things with big scale that I haven't seen anyone else put out. I haven't seen anyone else capable of it in our modern era. Yeah, I think you know, someone to watch for is Alex Garland. I did not like the last movie of his. But I like x Mokena. A lot. Oh, sure. You know, I'm really excited to see what he does. Yeah, I won't like it. But he's somebody I think that has a long future ahead of me. And I have a hard time doing overrated. Because I think somebody who gets to a certain level has probably done something really good at some point. And it's hard to be critical over somebody just because they're successful. And a lot of people like their stuff. Yeah. Well, there's, there's a lot of people who don't like that, you know, just because, well, I knew I liked him before. Sure. You know, right. But I don't think any of us have that kind of a mentality about filmmakers. So, um, yeah, so we've gotten some more questions from a different listener. Ron, for back. Hi, Ron. today. Well, from the beginning. These are all questions for all of us. The first one is, who is the one person live today that you most want to meet? Super easy for me. Yeah. Stephen King. I would really love to do that. That'd be pretty cool. Yeah, mine actually thinking of that and fandom kind of thing that probably Mike Flanagan. Yeah. I would love to know what that psychotic man's work schedule is. Because he never I don't think he I think he sleeps. I mean, he but he doesn't pump out a movie a year Fox pops out a frigging mini series a year. It's like crazy. What are you doing? I think he has all these ideas he's been waiting with and just, you know, finally gets opportunity to express them. That'd be really What about you've got this just such a hard question i A lot of my heroes died recently not died, but like, you know socially died and goodbye thought it'd be easy. One person Oh, I guess John Carpenter. Yeah, you're right. Thank you. John Carpenter I had written down Neil Gaiman as a as a second play. I mean, he's an incredible writer and even though I get really mad at him for various reasons, I think he called me but John Carpenter Fuck yes. I just hang out and like play Sonic with that guy. Which is what he does. This is probably a stupid question. But are you going to see gaming speak at the more? I got? I have not gotten one. Are you? Probably not just because the world is weird. And I noticed that I get weird around bustling people. I had such a good time at Emerald City because no one was there. Yes. Yeah, I really I get different walking through the vendor Hall and not bumping into like one person in like, two hours I bumped into that's really easy. That's crazy. But let's say you want to take his next one there. Yeah, I feel like this is the story of my life. Ron also asked What is one toy you had as a child that you would buy today? If you saw it in a store? I mean, I just have so many examples, because that's what I keep doing. Sure. Oh, I don't know. I you know, if there one though. You haven't found? I? Probably not. I mean, you know, this is the problem with being an adult and making a good living. You able to actually make really stupid purchases. They do. It's true. Okay, I've got one that's probably weird. Yeah. Do you ever remember the Guns of Navarone? playset? No, I think that's what it's called. But it's based on that movie. And it was this plastic playset I don't know how big it actually is. Because you know, I was much smaller. But I remember it being about a couple feet high maybe. And it was a rock face in the front. By rock. I mean, solid black plastic. And then a little kind of like the Deathstar. Inside it was a hotel. And it had like a big gun on the top and little like turret things on the bottom and came with all these army men. I remember really liking that one. So that that might be something all right, either look at and go. Wow, that's a cheap piece of crap. Plastic. That was right. Oh, well. Or I'm not gonna I don't have this one because of the price level. It'd be cool to have the original d&d box that I purchased. Okay, right there. The red box that was originally because that's when I started playing was on that one. That'd be cool. Um, yeah, mine is not shocking. I guess that'd be a turtle. Well, there's two things. There's two things the turtle item would probably be the party van. I never I never had any the turtle places I only ever had the turtles themselves. They are re releasing the Turtle Van. I tried to add for today. I mean, I just bought all the Turtles in Time turtles. So they do need a place to hang out. And then the other thing is probably the Star Trek Next Generation like bridge. That was also the thing. I was that guy. You're talking about the? I think he's got a trance like a what was the guys who made the Star Trek things and they play me? No, they made Star Trek. Okay, so you're talking about like the late 80s? One? Female? Yes. Not that not there at all day one when I worked at KB Toys that came out early. Yeah, I've seen them. I've seen it a few times, but then just never kind of look at it and go Yeah, that's cool. And walk. Yeah. Final question from Ron. What's your favorite movie theater snack. Very easy for me. I love dots. Oh my god. They're so good. I love dots. Oh, mine's just the standard. Popcorn man. Awesome popcorn. Well, sorry. To be even more specific. I really love the sinner Rama mix of regular popcorn and chocolate pop. Oh yeah. The most devastating part of Cinderella being closed. I would kill for that shit. I was so good. Ah, yeah, I'm changing my answer. Oh, I can imagine my taste like right now. Mine I only let myself get these things when I'm at the movies, which is Reese's Pieces. Oh, and I like to get a Frozen Coke. From coke. Okay. Okay, see? Nice. I don't think the theater I go to unfortunately has those because well, the Reese's I think they do. I don't know if they have the frozen cokes which Oh in cinema, yeah, the same the 21 and over one they might have it might be a different version. Margarita. I would take that actually. salutely like to take our next question. Yeah, absolutely. So we have another listener who pipes in Michael. No, no other name. That's Michael the bronze. Oh, actually, okay. Like somebody named Michael. Um, first question they have is my introduction to you was through the easiest shows I wasn't really aware of strange aeons magazine before that. What motivated you to start the magazine and continue in spirit with a podcast? That's such a good question, because I wondered that same thing. The magazine came about, like I was talking earlier about doing, you know, comic book with John. And believe it or not, we were down at the Lovecraft Film Festival back when they used to have this really cool book sold us books. Oh, man, that place is great. I was wandering through there. And I found the first issue of epic illustrated, which was a an adult fantasy comic book put out by Marvel in the 70s. And I started flipping through and I bought it. And I just loved it because it was, it was different stories, but it was also different paper than in itself. So it had like, paper that have glossy section and then it would have like a rough third cool. It's just like, What is going on with this cool magazine, some color, some was black and white. And I decided right then I was like, I'm not doing a comp book. I'm doing a magazine. And I want to, I want it to be something similar to this. And then the magazine just, I mean, it took off pretty quickly. But it became so fucking hard to put out constantly and regularly and all this stuff and it just became a job. You know, there wasn't money really to be made. I was hardly paying the artists anything and just taking forever. So it's just stop being fun, unfortunately. The but the one thing I have always loved about the magazine and Rick Tillman design, the logo, the strange aeons logo is really catchy. And I thought that it was a good brand name. So when we started the podcast, I had told him, you know, it was called debt again. Yeah, back then. And I had told him what I really want to do is call it strange aeons radio, and he was like, Okay, why don't you like, you don't have a problem with it because he was my partner in the strange aeons center. And he was like, Okay. I mean, let's face it. Our our feature film was called strange aeons. So it's not like we haven't been playing around with this name for a while, years. And then yeah, that was, you know, the strange aeons radio was just just branding, because the podcast is nothing like the magazine at all. Yeah, I would like to be able to offer different stuff under the strange aeons radio banner, different papers, recording sales and things like that. And that would make it feel like it was kind of spiritually connected to the magazine, which is what the magazine was. So Oh, that'd be good. He also asks, What are future goals and projects you would like to accomplish? I think I just answered that is their dream project. I would love to I mean, I'd like to get into publishing novels. But I really think that the strange aeons esthetic is cool design. And that works best for the for the novellas and everything. But he then asked what are Eric's and Vanessa's dream projects? Oh, man. Well, I have like so many things I want to do. I had actually written a feature film script about a creature from a lake that starts murdering people in a small town. But it's tied to a girl in a strange way. Um, and I started to go ahead and just form that into a book. I did the opposite of you, Kelly, where I was too flowery. And I had too many ideas. And the screenplay was just not holding what I wanted to express. So I started adopting that and I'm hoping to actually, like, start writing proper stuff. And then I'd also you know, tried to get Night Trap off the ground, but that hasn't really gotten any worse so far. So I don't know. Like there's all all the time I have things that I really want to do and get excited about. Yeah, well, you did just hear me say I want to publish Well, hey, let's make some magic. Look. Publish. Let me tell you a potential landmine there, man. I want to put my chocolate in my peanut butter. I want to put the peanut butter Reese's Pieces. That's right. Okay. All right. Find this a great answer a really annoying answer. I'd love to do this film called Casa goddamnit. I'd love to do this film was name I've barely can pronounce posek to script the Kelly wrote that spoke to me like very few scripts ever have with Hellraiser feelings and feelings of alienation feeling of not belonging, but then finding maybe the way you can belong in a world gone mad to pull in the trailer version. Right, but I fucking love the script. It's absolutely amazing. So that actually would be better than the one I've got right now make me tear up. That sounds incredible. And it reminds me that we were supposed to do a teaser for that. So I gotta, I gotta get off my ass and do that. Do that today. Finally gonna answer both of the next ones. We got one more from this nice lady named Dina. Oh, he sounds beautiful, man. That's true. So that's my wife. She put in a question. Last night, we were coming back from the birthday thing at her parents house. She's like, Oh, crap, I wanted to give you questions. I don't know. How about this. So she came up with one. Oh, that one. So I was like, I think it's cool. I got an answer. I know for sure on it. But let's see Kelly, just start this one with what movie? Would you if you could remake a film? Why would you remake the race? I knew that was gonna be that movie could be done. In a really cool way. I've got I've got two ideas where it could be done in early 50s Las Vegas, before Las Vegas became Las Vegas. And it was like, obviously run by the Bob. It was dirt roads out there with a couple of shacks as casinos. So you could bring in the Wraith which is about a guy, vengeful spirit in his car and everything. But you could make it a silver Wraith. Oh, you know, the the car. And he could be going after these mobsters that took them out. Right. So there's that way to do it. Or I would set it like maybe in the Pine Ridge Reservation in the 70s where when the FBI agents suddenly started disappearing, and you could tie that into a you know, a 68 charger. Come back, you know, I do something with the wraith. I fucking love the idea. I love the movie, even though it's really bad. Yeah, that's what I would do. Um, I mean, I kind of answered it a little bit before but there are all these movies out there that have such great concepts but then the characters just fall totally flat. So movies where again girls are really underutilized or running around in their underwear or just like not actually doing any the smart intelligent things they could do any slasher movie from the 80s percent female cast of the thing maybe that would be fucking banana. That would be nuts. Although I mean, that's a perfect movie. So what for? But you know, there's there's other films too that just like us women in a weird way that I think would be really fascinating. If you had to rewrite like cherry 2000 movies a fuckin Wow. Yeah, I know. You remade that like now and did some crazy cool sci fi shit. And it wasn't just like a I don't even know what that movie is. If it if it was like a movie, an actual movie. That could be pretty cool. I mean, you could certainly have some interesting social commentary. A Boy and His Dog a girl in his cat and her cat. So I just think replace male characters with female characters go beyond that. But yeah, there's i Yeah, throw in just do the script from the thing, and just cast it all with women and let it play out though. I mean, that's what happened with alien was supposed to be a dude. And they're just like, oh, I don't know, let's put a chicken there and see what happens. And it was fucking amazing. Or what about you? I've got one that I mentioned this one to you before, a long time ago, but it's a I think is a 80s or late 80s early 90s film called Impulse. And the story in that is that a something like an asteroid or something hits a small town and everybody in it loses their ability to control their impulses. Whatever impulse supposedly, whatever impulse they have, they just do which should lead to an incredibly shocking, disturbing violent film. And it's not Oh no, I think the worst thing that happens in it, it because there's only about one thing I really remember as being intense was where a guy grabs his hand. He's like gets all pissy some girl turned him down or something. So he grabs his hand and bends All his fingers back and breaking them by really that's your that was the impulse. But you had. So it would be over the top crazy but an interesting idea just horribly horribly executed. Yeah. No, definitely. I mean, that's so much like the the Resident Evil movie that just came out it's like, so close guys so close, just kidding pushed a lot of things a little bit further dismissed. Well, I have a random question for you guys before we finish up today, and we got a little bit left, so Oh, no, fantastic. Well, just as far as a questions for us go. Um, is there something that you either in the last year or maybe in your life, what is the project or the thing you were the most proud of? that you made? Put out there I mean, super, super proud of Commodore. Yeah, Commodore, that turned out exactly the way I wanted it to. And so I'm really happy with that. But, you know, I would say this podcast, I'm very proud of your podcast and the way it has grown. And, yeah, podcast is pretty spot on and keeps evolving and getting into more interesting. And we're not above all, we were talking about that last week or something like that, where we need to let's see what what we can do to change and streamline or adjust what we're doing. Otherwise get just stale. But by probably for just go with film projects that I've done, because of audience reaction and how much fun it was to watch in theaters were played was the package. Yeah, that's a good movie, or two and a half minutes short. And what it became this weird thing for me where the end, when the End Hits. I'd be curious what the crowd laughs at different points in that movie. Depending on the crowd, they laughed at different points that at Lovecraft, they laughed really early, because everybody there got where it was going at cryptocurrency was sort of in the middle. And there's another festival we played at that I blanking out where it became really late. Because I think people were expecting something else to happen. And then that it went dark and they realize Oh, my God and started laughing. So that was a lot of fun. And so you know, work. Just worked. That's awesome. You, um, God. Yeah. I mean, it is a hard question. Right. Like, I think for the last year, like, you know, absolutely, I think working on the show has been incredible. Getting to slowly but surely work on projects that I respect and value and enjoy is big. But I mean, this is definitely my favorite thing that I do each week. Each week, definitely this week that I'm up to, but probably of all time, and I'm still very proud of how hard it turned out. Like I've worked on some bigger films, but you know, working for other people on their creative projects, like Yeah, cool. It has famous people or whatever, whatever but it's not yours versus something that's yours that you're like okay, I'm putting this out here and hey, man, if I directed deer correctly, then I've done something in my life. I love the shot with the with her touching the deer I was just there's there's no way this shot should be in a no budget film. Yep. Here's name was Penny. Really like Brad. Very sweet deer hung out with us until he got full than left. That's fantastic. I am going to finish things up with this handwritten letter from Danny Wilford. First of all you guys Danny sent me the spaceship stuff that I had asked him to 3d print out for me. I asked him what I could pay for he was just like don't just the shipping 10 bucks you know it comes here the shipping is much more than $10 So I've got some fun stuff in mind for sending to Danny. Nice. What I love about daddy's like I don't want your money send me something you know. Cool. Well, what do you got that I'm gonna like? That makes it really difficult you know? Yeah, just like I would much rather just throw money at you. He Oh, but one of the things I opened was this little ink pad. I was like What's this all about? And then a strange aeons logo. Rubber Stamp kit so cool. So any is stamped everything in the house? Now should see the walls man. This he was really just a neat little surprise. It also sent this handwritten letter with another letter, he we were texting back. Evil laughter coming from you is impressive. And we were texting back and forth. He was like I get it this fucker is not writing back. Like you got that right. He says he asked about the idea of Commodore and everything. I've talked enough about that. I think I'll let you guys answer this one. Ninja November is inspired. What was the genesis genesis of this celebration of unseen assassins? Eric was there you both were? Yeah, it was. It was a text string string. I thought it was a joke. total disbelief. And I was pretty sure you were serious. You're afraid I was serious? I just had that panic moment of do i Are there enough industries that I want to sit through? But no, that was all that was all Kelly that was that was from the heavens, man. I fell into your lap far. And you fed the masses with it. There you go, daddy. That's how I feel about it as well. You know what, though? That was, I mean, as far as a themed month goes and that was a lot of fun. It was actually a lot of fun. It was so good to revisit some of that shit like fucking Ninja Turtles three. God damn. what a what a moment. He says I have a rough idea of some of your history. Would you mind sharing a portion of your journey in detail? I think we did the rewind. Yeah, yeah, I heard the pilots say this The genesis of this episode comes from this letter and me not wanting to write like I know what I'll just answer these questions on the air. I have to just tell Danny how much I really appreciate all the work he has done for us with never asking anything in return and just being you know just a real fucking sweetheart. So and that goes for everybody who is listening regularly is liking and sharing the posts sending us money for some ridiculous reason you guys that is great reasons I agree are unbelievable to me. I mean this kind of generosity surrounded by you know the generosity and the kindness of the people who enjoy our show between just looking it's like I see a stamp ICMS right we're sitting on chairs are comfortable and mind spools as yours and like we had mic stands that we were able to use for Emerald City that you know were able to support us instead of from have holding holding a cryptic con and trying very hard not to brush with my fingers the mic and just be like yes, I don't look like a robot at all rest Armand table. Well with that in mind, one of the things that we are going to start offering is so we're going to have we're going to be putting up the episodes of strange aeons radio because they are available on YouTube. We qualify as having them on IMDb and there will be IMDb credits because it is basically a a web series that way. And what we want to do is the people who are donating these amounts of money, you know you donate 50 bucks. Some of you have donated much more than that. We're going to give you an IMDB credit. We're going to list you as a producer on the episode these are going to be real IMDb credits that you can show to Hollywood snobs just like I do when I'm out the bar. Look at how many IMDb credits right hey baby, I want to see my IMDb credit. No, there you go. Come back hopefully you'll have better luck with them than I do. But that's going to be one of the things that we're offering and so for the people who are literally producing the show by making sure we've got seats to sit in and microphone and so work and all that stuff. Just another way we want to give value back for the value we're getting and you know if you do a donation and you've got a favorite episode or something that you want to be the listed producer on feel free to send that out because a lot of episodes of they are easy to post is still gonna take a long time. You go Yeah, well my favorite one is actually episode 132. Great. All yours. Yep. Right and this is also an incentive Hey, if you want a ton of IMDb credits, it's only gonna cost you a ton of money. Are you a producer who would like to have producing credits but don't have time or energy to actually produce real TV or film side note for those who may not know if you see the word executive producer and sometimes associate producer that means they put money in and probably did very little else. All right. So it's they're not unimportant that associate producers out there but that is a bullshit title. We all know it. Yeah, yeah, I think I was given that as a favor just because the guy liked me. Nothing to do on the field. Yeah, yeah. So this is why I have no producing credits. Never give people I'll give you one for the first episode we were on. Anyway. So that's the show. Thanks so much for all of the questions. This was fun. I got to learn a little bit more about you guy. Yeah, thank you guys so much. It's really been great. I realize there's, you know, five or six of you and you know who you are that we talked about a little bit more, because you contact us. So you know, if you want to be more involved in the show, just reach out. We're really not too. We're praising data. Yeah, we're under pressure, but don't feel free. If you've got questions you want to know about or ideas of shows, feel free to send them. We may use them we may write but feel free to send them but don't expect much. Bye. But yeah, we love all the sharing all the concepts. Get on to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, share us around. It's all great. I even love the race to post first. Stuff like that. It's just you know, we've got the best fans. We don't have fans. We have listeners. And we have friends. Yeah. Strange friends strange aeons friends from strange friends for sure. Strange aeons army. Yes, there we are. That's what it is. That's what we call them. Alright guys, well, we'll probably do this in another 100 episodes or so. And we'll be back next week with a regular show. Oh, wait. I have to pick a topic. I paper lesson. Oh, your film has to take place in Los Angeles. Wow. It's a rough city. There's not a lot of folks here at my home. Why I'm called Los Angeles movie scene from LA. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Well, the other Los Angeles Escape from New York was probably shot in LA. Okay, so that's what we're doing next week. Los Angeles based genre film. Cool. I'll see you next week. Bye. Hey, strange aeons radio was artisanal quality podcasting, handcrafted with all natural ingredients and edited to perfection by Eric Margaret. Our blistering theme song is strange aeons part one by the band nightshade, and is used with permission. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. And if you enjoyed this episode, please consider dropping a positive review on Apple podcasts. Holy shit 150